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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray). Search the whole document.

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Paris (France) (search for this): card 0
the Athenian colony. Possibly that pacified him. And his legend in the mouth of the poets seemed perhaps like the story of his own mountaineers, multitudes of strong men, stormy and chivalrous, terrible in onset, who somehow in the end melted away before the skill and persistent courage of a civilised Greek city. CHARACTERS OF THE PLAY HECTOR, Prince of Ilion and General of the Trojan Armies. AENEAS, a Trojan Prince. DOLON, a Trojan. PARIS, also called ALEXANDER, brother of Hector. RHESUS, King of Thrace, son of the River Strŷmon and the Muse of the Mountains. A THRACIAN, the King's charioteer. ODYSSEUS, a Greek chieftain, famous for craft and daring. DIOMEDES, a Greek chieftain, famous for valour. A SHEPHERD. The Goddess ATHENA. The MUSE OF THE MOUNTAINS. CHORUS of Trojan Guards with their LEADER. Some THRACIANS with their CAPTAIN, Attendants, &c. The date and authorship of the play are unknown; i
Thrace (Greece) (search for this): card 0
egend in the mouth of the poets seemed perhaps like the story of his own mountaineers, multitudes of strong men, stormy and chivalrous, terrible in onset, who somehow in the end melted away before the skill and persistent courage of a civilised Greek city. CHARACTERS OF THE PLAY HECTOR, Prince of Ilion and General of the Trojan Armies. AENEAS, a Trojan Prince. DOLON, a Trojan. PARIS, also called ALEXANDER, brother of Hector. RHESUS, King of Thrace, son of the River Strŷmon and the Muse of the Mountains. A THRACIAN, the King's charioteer. ODYSSEUS, a Greek chieftain, famous for craft and daring. DIOMEDES, a Greek chieftain, famous for valour. A SHEPHERD. The Goddess ATHENA. The MUSE OF THE MOUNTAINS. CHORUS of Trojan Guards with their LEADER. Some THRACIANS with their CAPTAIN, Attendants, &c. The date and authorship of the play are unknown; it probably belongs to the Fifth Century B.C., and is attributed
Aulis (Greece) (search for this): card 0
ed to many plays of Euripides, and in one case we even know the name of the producer; he was Euripides the Younger, son of the poet. Among other things we have reason to believe that he wrote some parts of the Iphigenia in Aulis. And in this connexion we can hardly help noticing that the Iphigenia in Aulis, like the Rhesus and like no other Greek tragedy, has two alternative openings, one a dull prologue and one a lyrical scene in anapaests under Aulis, like the Rhesus and like no other Greek tragedy, has two alternative openings, one a dull prologue and one a lyrical scene in anapaests under the stars. The general style of the two plays is utterly different; the Iphigenia is most typically late Euripidean; but one would not be surprised to learn that they had both passed at some time through the same revising hand. This hypothesis seems to work well. But one difficulty remains. We have so far gone on the supposition that Euripides at twenty-five or thirty perhaps wrote very differently from Euripides at forty-six, and that the manner we
Troad (Turkey) (search for this): card 0
e, full of light," where he lies among the buried silver-veins of Pangaion. If the uttermost need comes, doubtless he will wake again. When the Athenians began making their dangerous settlements on the coast of Thrace-ten thousand settlers were massacred by Rhesus's people about 465 B.C.: Amphipolis not fully established till 437-they found the legend of Rhesus in the air, and eventually they thought it prudent to send for his hallowed bones from the Troad, where they were supposed to be buried, and give them a tomb in the Athenian colony. Possibly that pacified him. And his legend in the mouth of the poets seemed perhaps like the story of his own mountaineers, multitudes of strong men, stormy and chivalrous, terrible in onset, who somehow in the end melted away before the skill and persistent courage of a civilised Greek city. CHARACTERS OF THE PLAY HECTOR, Prince of Ilion and Ge
Cyclops (Arizona, United States) (search for this): card 0
untinged by philosophy, we shall find the nearest approach to it in the Cyclops. Next to the Cyclops I am not sure what play would come, but the ACyclops I am not sure what play would come, but the Alcestis would not be far off. It has especially several Epic forms which cannot be paralleled in tragedy. Now the conjunction of these two plays wclidae as mutilated-the three shortest. But, what is more important, the Cyclops is not a tragedy but a satyr-play, and the Alcestis is a tragedy o1163 lines, has 122; the Rhesus, with less than 1000 lines, has 177; the Cyclops, with only 701 lines, has actually 220. This calculation is doubtlipidean norm goes further than the Alcestis, and not so far as the Cyclops, and goes in very much the same direction. I feel in the Rhesus a good daptors: these things are not of course comic, like some incidents in the Cyclops. They belong to tragedy; but they are near the outside limit of the trag
Amphipolis (Greece) (search for this): card 0
deep drinker, a child of battle and of song. Like other divine kings he dies in his youth and strength, and keeps watch over his people from some "feasting presence, full of light," where he lies among the buried silver-veins of Pangaion. If the uttermost need comes, doubtless he will wake again. When the Athenians began making their dangerous settlements on the coast of Thrace-ten thousand settlers were massacred by Rhesus's people about 465 B.C.: Amphipolis not fully established till 437-they found the legend of Rhesus in the air, and eventually they thought it prudent to send for his hallowed bones from the Troad, where they were supposed to be buried, and give them a tomb in the Athenian colony. Possibly that pacified him. And his legend in the mouth of the poets seemed perhaps like the story of his own mountaineers, multitudes of strong men, stormy and chivalrous, terrible in onset, who somehow i
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 0
om the Troad, where they were supposed to be buried, and give them a tomb in the Athenian colony. Possibly that pacified him. And his legend in the mouth of the poets seemed perhaps like the story of his own mountaineers, multitudes of strong men, stormy and chivalrous, terrible in onset, who somehow in the end melted away before the skill and persistent courage of a civilised Greek city. CHARACTERS OF THE PLAY HECTOR, Prince of Ilion and General of the Trojan Armies. AENEAS, a Trojan Prince. DOLON, a Trojan. PARIS, also called ALEXANDER, brother of Hector. RHESUS, King of Thrace, son of the River Strŷmon and the Muse of the Mountains. A THRACIAN, the King's charioteer. ODYSSEUS, a Greek chieftain, famous for craft and daring. DIOMEDES, a Greek chieftain, famous for valour. A SHEPHERD. The Goddess ATHENA. The MUSE OF THE MOUNTAINS. CHORUS of Trojan Guards with their LEADER. Some THRACIANS with thei
Aetna (Italy) (search for this): card 0
whole it accords with my general impression that the Rhesus in its variation from the Euripidean norm goes further than the Alcestis, and not so far as the Cyclops, and goes in very much the same direction. I feel in the Rhesus a good deal of that curious atmosphere, not exactly comic, but wild and extravagant, which the Greeks felt to be suited to the Satyr horde; the atmosphere normally breathed by the one-eyed Giant of the cavern on volcanic Aetna, or the drunken and garlanded Heracles who wrestles with Death and cracks his ribs for him at midnight among the tombs. The whole scene and setting of the Rhesus; the man-wolf crawling away into the darkness and his two enemies presently crawling in out of the same darkness with his bloody spoils; the divine Thracian king with his round targe that shines by night and his horses whiter than the snow; the panic of the watch, the vaunting o
1419 AD (search for this): card 0
e Alcestis is a tragedy of a special sort, written to take the place of a satyr-play. It is a tragedy with some half grotesque figures and a fantastic atmosphere. This is no place for a close analysis of the diction of the various works of Euripides; but taking one rough test, just for what it is worth, we may try to count the number of words in each play which are not found elsewhere in Euripides. The Medea, a central sort of play, has in its 1419 lines 103 such words. The Alcestis, with 1163 lines, has 122; the Rhesus, with less than 1000 lines, has 177; the Cyclops, with only 701 lines, has actually 220. This calculation is doubtless slightly inexact: in any case it is worth very little until it is carefully analysed. But on the whole it accords with my general impression that the Rhesus in its variation from the Euripidean norm goes further than the Alcestis, and not so far as the
deceiving the Alexandrian critics, detectives specially trained for this kind of work? Let us try quite a different hypothesis, and begin by accepting the external evidence as true. The famous critic, Crates, of the second century B.C., happens to mention-in excuse of what he took to be a slip in the poet's astronomy-that the Rhesus of Euripides was a youthful work. Now the earliest dated tragedy of Euripides that we possess is the Alcestis, B.C. 438, written when he was about forty-six. His style may well have been considerably different fifteen or twenty years earlier, and must certainly have been much under the influence of Aeschylus. So far, so good. Then what of the other difficulties, the three different opening scenes and the few passages of late phrasing or technique? One obvious explanation suits both. The three different openings pretty clearly imply that the play was
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