hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
1500 AD 25 25 Browse Search
1300 AD 16 16 Browse Search
1200 AD 14 14 Browse Search
1600 AD 12 12 Browse Search
1400 AD 10 10 Browse Search
1800 AD 9 9 Browse Search
1100 AD 5 5 Browse Search
330 BC 4 4 Browse Search
17 AD 4 4 Browse Search
338 BC 4 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.). Search the whole document.

Found 3 total hits in 3 results.

. We will now commence our detailed account, beginning from the Sacred Promontory. This is the most western point not only of Europe, but of the whole habitable earth. For the habitable earth is bounded to the west by two continents, namely, the extremities of Europe and Libya,Africa. which are inhabited respectively by the Iberians and the Maurusians.The Mauritanians. But the Iberian extremity, at the promontoryCape St. Vincent. we have mentioned, juts out beyond the other as much as 1500 stadia.Cape St. Vincent is about 1600 stadia west of Cape Spartel in Africa. Strabo imagined that beyond this cape the African coast inclined to the south-east. In reality it advances eleven degrees and a half farther west to Cape Verd, which is 8° 29′ west of Cape St. Vincent. The region adjacent to this cape they call in the Latin tongue Cu- neum,Herodotus is the first who speaks of a people of Iberia, to whom he gives the name of Kunh/sioi or Ku/uhtes: he describes them as inhab
is fertile, especially what is beyond the Pillars [of Hercules]. This however will be shown more in detail, but we must first describe the figure and extent [of the country]. In shape it resembles a hide stretched out in length from west to east, the forepartThe neck, &c. towards the east, its breadth being from north to south. Its length is about 6000 stadia; the greatest breadth is 5000; while there are parts considerably less CAS. 137.Note. The pages of Casaubon's edition of 1620 are given to facilitate reference to various editions and translations of Strabo. than 3000, particularly in the vicinity of the Pyrenees, which form the eastern side. This chain of mountains stretches without interruption from north to south,The Pyrenees, on the contrary, range from east to west, with a slight inclination towards the north. This error gives occasion to several of the mistakes made by Strabo respecting the course of certain of the rivers in France. and divides KelticaF
account, beginning from the Sacred Promontory. This is the most western point not only of Europe, but of the whole habitable earth. For the habitable earth is bounded to the west by two continents, namely, the extremities of Europe and Libya,Africa. which are inhabited respectively by the Iberians and the Maurusians.The Mauritanians. But the Iberian extremity, at the promontoryCape St. Vincent. we have mentioned, juts out beyond the other as much as 1500 stadia.Cape St. Vincent is about 1600 stadia west of Cape Spartel in Africa. Strabo imagined that beyond this cape the African coast inclined to the south-east. In reality it advances eleven degrees and a half farther west to Cape Verd, which is 8° 29′ west of Cape St. Vincent. The region adjacent to this cape they call in the Latin tongue Cu- neum,Herodotus is the first who speaks of a people of Iberia, to whom he gives the name of Kunh/sioi or Ku/uhtes: he describes them as inhabiting the most western part of Europe