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split it completely, but was only able to force it enough to let the wedges fall out, when the gaping log presently closed on him, and he, being taken as in a snare, was devoured by wild beasts. Beyond this, at the distance of 200 stadia, is situated Sybaris,Sybaris was said to have been founded by the people of Trœzene not long after the siege of Troy. Aristot. Politic. lib. v. cap. 3. Solin. viii. But those were subsequently joined by a more numerous colony of Achmæans, about B. C. 720. Euseb. Chron. ii. a colony settled by the Achœans, between the two rivers Cratio( Ko|a=qis. There was a stream of the same name in Achaia, from whence the Italian Crathis, now Crati, derived its name. The Crathis and Sybaris now join about 14 miles from the sea. and Sybaris.Now Cochile. Its founder was Is . . . .Koray objected to the old reading, o\ )Iseliken\s, and proposed instead Oi)s. . . . (Elikeu\s; Groskurd thought it better to translate it Ihr Erbauer war Is .....aus He li
sed that Proserpine came over from Sicily to gather them, and from thence the custom among women of this city, to gather flowers and plait garlands, prevailed to such an extent, that they now think it shameful to wear purchased garlands at the festivals.There was a temple erected to Proserpine in these meadows, and a building called Amalthea's horn, raised by Gelon of Syracuse. It also possesses a harbourThe present harbour of Bivona. made by Agathocles,He reigned from B. C. 317 to B. C. 289. the tyrant of Sicily, when he was in possession of the town. On sailing hence to the Portus Herculis,Now Le Formicole. The promontory named Capo Vaticano seems to have been anciently known under the same appellation. we come to the point where the headlands of Italy, as they stretch towards the Strait [of Sicily], begin to turn westward. In this voyage we pass Medma,Medma, or Mesma, was situated on the right bank of the river Mesima, which seems to retain traces of the name of the anci
ed by the Rhodians. Antiochus says that the site of Siris having become the subject of a contention between the Tarentini and the Thurii, on that occasion commanded by Cleandridas the general who had been banished from Lacedæmon, the two people came to a composition, and agreed to inhabit it in common, but that the colonyAbout B. C. 444. should be considered as Tarentine; however, at a subsequent period both the name and the locality were changed, and it was called Heraclea.About B. C. 433. Next in order is Metapontium,In the time of Pausanias, this city was a heap of ruins, and nothing remained standing but the walls and theatre. Considerable vestiges, situated near the station called Torre di Mare, indicate the site it an- ciently adorned. at a distance of 140 stadia from the sea-port of Heraclea. It is said to be a settlement of the Pylians at the time of their return from Ilium under Nestor; their success in agriculture was so great, that it is said they offered at
ri, they succumbed, and Rhegium, after a gallant defence which lasted nearly a year, was compelled to yield, about the year 398 B. C. The insulting tyrant sentenced the heroic Phyton, who had commanded the town, to a cruel death, and removed the few inhabitants that remained to Sicily. but his son (Dionysius the younger) partly restored it,B. C. 360. and called it Phœbia. During the war with Pyrrhus, a body of Campanians destroyed most of the citizens against the faith of treaties,B. C. 280. and a little before the Marsic or social war, earthquakes destroyed most of the towns;B.C. 91. but after Augustus Cæsar had driven Sextus Pompeius out of Sicily, when he saw that the city was deficient of inhabitants, he appointed certain of those who accompanied the expedition to reside there, and it is now tolerably well peopled.The defeat of Sextus Pompeins is referred to the year 36 B. C., but there is no precise date mentioned for the establishment of the veteran soldiers i
ct called Tauriana.Cluvier thought that we should read Qourianh\ instead of Taurianh\. The Leucani are of Samnite origin. Having vanquished the Posidoniates and their allies, they took possession of their cities. At one time the institutions of the Leucani were democratic, but during the wars a king was elected by those who were possessed of chief authority: at the present time they are Roman. The Bruttii occupy the remainder of the coast as far as the Strait of Sicily, extending about 1350 stadia. Antiochus, in his treatise on Italy, says that this district, which he intended to describe, was called Italy, but that previously it had been called Œnotria. The boundary which he assigns to it on the Tyrrhenian Sea, is the river Lao,Laos, now Lao. and on the Sea of Sicily Metapontium, the former of which we have given as the boundary of the Bruttii. He describes Tarentum, which is next to Metapontium,Torre di Mare. as beyond Italy, calling it Iapygian. He also relates that, a
received its name from this city. It together with the Hipponiates Sinus forms the isthmus which we have mentioned above.Book vi. cap. i. § 4. DionysiusPliny seems to attribute to Dionysius the elder the project of cutting not walling off the isthmus: Itaque Dionysius major intercisam eo loco adjicere Siciliæ voluit. Hist. Nat. lib. iii. § 15. Grimaldi also is of opinion that the circumstance mentioned by Strabo should be referred to the first years of Dionysius the younger, about B. C. 366–359. undertook to build a wall across the isthmus, at the time he was carrying on war against the Leucani, assigning as a pretext that it would afford security to the inhabitants of the peninsula from the inroads of the barbarians dwelling beyond it; but in truth his intention was to cut off the communication of the Greeks with each other, and to have the greater power over those who dwelt within the peninsula, but those who dwelt withoutBy those who dwelt without, Strabo doubtless inten
CHAPTER I. AFTER the mouth of the Silaro,The ancient Silaris. is Leucania, and the temple of Argive Juno, founded by Jason. Near to this, within 50 stadia, is Posidonia.Pesti. Sailing thence, towards the high sea, is the island of Leucosia,It is now called Licosa, and sometimes Isola piana; several vestiges of buildings were discovered on the island in 1696. Antonin. della Lucan. p. ii. disc. 8. at a little distance from the main-land. It bears the name of one of the Sirens, who according to the mythology was cast up here, after having been precipitated with her companions into the deep. The promontoryCapo della Licosa. of the island projects opposite the Sirenussæ,Punta della Campanella. forming the bay of Posidonium.Golfo di Salerno. After having made this cape there is another contiguous bay, on which is built the city which the Phocæans called Hyela when they founded it, but others Ela from a certain fountain. People in the present day call it Elea. It is here that
nergy, the ambitious views of this artful prince might have been frustrated; but after the defeat of their forces on the Elleporus, now Callipari, they succumbed, and Rhegium, after a gallant defence which lasted nearly a year, was compelled to yield, about the year 398 B. C. The insulting tyrant sentenced the heroic Phyton, who had commanded the town, to a cruel death, and removed the few inhabitants that remained to Sicily. but his son (Dionysius the younger) partly restored it,B. C. 360. and called it Phœbia. During the war with Pyrrhus, a body of Campanians destroyed most of the citizens against the faith of treaties,B. C. 280. and a little before the Marsic or social war, earthquakes destroyed most of the towns;B.C. 91. but after Augustus Cæsar had driven Sextus Pompeius out of Sicily, when he saw that the city was deficient of inhabitants, he appointed certain of those who accompanied the expedition to reside there, and it is now tolerably well peopled.The def
rii, from a fountain of that name. The water of the river Sybaris has the peculiar property of making the horses which drink it shy,"Compare Ælian. Hist. Anim. ii. 36. for which reason they keep their horses away from the river. The Crati turns the hair of those who bathe in it yellow, and sometimes white, but has been found salutary for the cure of many disorders. Thurii, after having flourished for a long time, became a continual prey to the aggressions of the Leucani,From B. C. 390 to 290. and afterwards the Tarentini troubling them, they appealed to the Romans for succour, who, in course of time, sent a colonyAbout B. C. 194. when it was nearly deserted, and changed the name of the city to Copiæ.Cæsar however calls it Thurii, and designates it a municipal town. Civ. Bell. iii. 22. After Thurii is Lagaria,Now La Nucara. a garrison fort; it was originally settled by EpeiusIt is not ascertained whether this leader were the architect of the Horse of Troy. and the Ph
was taken by Harpagus, the general of Cyrus, those who had the means embarked with their families, and sailed under the conduct of Creontiades, first to Cyrnos and Marseilles, but having been driven thence, they founded Elea;Or Velia, founded 532 B.C., mentioned by Horace, Epist. I. xv. l, Quæ sit hyems Veliæ, quod cœlum, Vala, Salerni. the name of which some say is derived from the river Elees.The modern Alento. The city is distant about two hundred stadia from Posidonia. After this ciion of its citizens, who fell at the battle of the Sagras. Its celebrity too was not a little spread by the number of Pythagoreans who resided there, and Milo,Milo is said to have carried off the prize for wrestling from the 62nd Olympiad, B. C. 532, and also to have commanded the 100,000 Crotoniatæ who engaged the hostile armies of Sybaris and destroyed their city, about B. C. 509. Diod. Sic. xii. 9, &c. who was the most renowned of wrestlers, and lived in terms of intimacy with Pythagor
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