hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
1500 AD 25 25 Browse Search
1300 AD 16 16 Browse Search
1200 AD 14 14 Browse Search
1600 AD 12 12 Browse Search
1400 AD 10 10 Browse Search
1800 AD 9 9 Browse Search
1100 AD 5 5 Browse Search
330 BC 4 4 Browse Search
17 AD 4 4 Browse Search
338 BC 4 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.). Search the whole document.

Found 7 total hits in 7 results.

the cities, have been destroyed, it would be of no service, even if it were possible, to ascertain the names of cities and regions occupied by obscure and extinct people. This destruction, which began a long time since, still continues in many parts in consequence of rebellion. It has been checked by the Romans, who accepted the supreme authority from the inhabitants and lodged soldiers in their houses. Polybius says that Paulus [Emilius], after the defeat of the MacedoniansB. C. 168. and their king Perseus, destroyed 70 cities of the Epirotæ (most of which belonged to the Molotti) and reduced to slavery 150,000 of the inhabitants. Still, however, I shall endeavour, as far as it is compatible with the design of this work, to describe, as far as I am able, these places in detail, beginning from the sea-coast near the Ionian Gulf, where the navigation out of the Adriatic terminates. The first parts of this coast are those about Epidamnus and Apollonia. From Apolloni
ian Gulf, which is a little more than four stadia in width. The circuit of the gulf is 400 stadia, and the whole has good harbours. On sailing into it, on the right hand are the Acarnanes, who are Greeks; and here near the entrance of the gulf is a temple of Apollo Actius, situated on an eminence; in the plain below is a sacred grove, and a naval station. Here Augustus CæsarCæsar Augustus (then Cæsar Octavianus) obtained the celebrated victory of Actium over Marcus Antonius, B. C. 31. The latter, after his defeat, fled into Egypt with Cleopatra. The battle would appear to have taken place at the entrance into the Gulf of Arta, and therefore probably off La Punta, opposite Prevesa, and not off the modern town of Azio. dedicated as offerings one-tenth of the vessels taken in war, from vessels of one bank to vessels of ten banks of oars. The vessels, and the buildings destined for their reception, were destroyed, it is said, by fire. On the left hand are Nicopolis,In th
ed among themselves the country on this side of the isthmus.The Peloponnesus, which before the arrival of Pelops was called Apia. The case was the same on the other side of the isthmus; for Thracians, under their leader Eumolpus,Eumolpus took possession of Eleusis B. C. 1400. He is said to have there instituted the mysteries of Ceres. took possession of Attica; Tereus of Daulis in Phocæa; the Phœnicians, with their leader Cadmus,Cadmus, son of Agenor, king of Tyre, arrived in Bœotia B. C. 1550. The citadel of Thebes was named after him. occupied the Cadmeian district; Aones, and Temmices, and Hyantes, Bœotia. Pindar says, there was a time when the Bœotian people were called Syes.Sues, Su/as, swine, in allusion to their ignorance. Some names show their barbarous origin, as Cecrops, Codrus, Œclus, Cothus, Drymas, and Crinacus.There were two kings of Athens named Cecrops. The first of this name, first king of Attica and Bœotia, came from Egypt. Cecrops II. was the 7th, and Codru
Chaones eastward towards the Gulfs of Ambracia and Corinth, and having the Ausonian Sea on the right, and Epirus on the left, comprises 1300 stadia to the mouth of the Ambracian Gulf. In this interval is Panormus,Panormo. a large port in the middle of the Ceraunian mountains. Next to this is Onchesmus,Santi Quaranta. another harbour, opposite to which are the western extremities of Corcyra,Corfu. and then again another port, Cassiope,Cassiopo. (Cassope?) whence to BrundusiumBrindisi. are 1700 stadia. It is the same distance to Tarentum from another promontory more to the south than Cassiope, which is called Phalacrum. Next after Onchesmus are Posidium, and Buthrotum,Butrinto. (which is situated upon the mouth of the lake Pelodes, in a spot of a peninsula form, and has a Roman colony,) and the Sybota. The SybotaSyvota. are small islands at a little distance from Epirus, lying near Leucimme,C. Bianco. the eastern promontory of Corcyra. There are also other small islands, not
t colonists from Phrygia into the Peloponnesus, which took his name; DanausB. C. 1570. He was king of Argos. brought colonists from Egypt; Dry- opes, Caucones, Pelasgi, Leleges, and other barbarous nations, partitioned among themselves the country on this side of the isthmus.The Peloponnesus, which before the arrival of Pelops was called Apia. The case was the same on the other side of the isthmus; for Thracians, under their leader Eumolpus,Eumolpus took possession of Eleusis B. C. 1400. He is said to have there instituted the mysteries of Ceres. took possession of Attica; Tereus of Daulis in Phocæa; the Phœnicians, with their leader Cadmus,Cadmus, son of Agenor, king of Tyre, arrived in Bœotia B. C. 1550. The citadel of Thebes was named after him. occupied the Cadmeian district; Aones, and Temmices, and Hyantes, Bœotia. Pindar says, there was a time when the Bœotian people were called Syes.Sues, Su/as, swine, in allusion to their ignorance. Some names show their barbar
their kings being descended from the Æacidæ, and because the ancient and famous oracle of DodonaThe site of Dodona is unknown. was in their country. Chaones, Thesproti, and next after these Cassopæi, (who are Thes- proti,) occupy the coast, a fertile tract reaching from the Ceraunian mountains to the Ambracian Gulf. The voyage commencing from the Chaones eastward towards the Gulfs of Ambracia and Corinth, and having the Ausonian Sea on the right, and Epirus on the left, comprises 1300 stadia to the mouth of the Ambracian Gulf. In this interval is Panormus,Panormo. a large port in the middle of the Ceraunian mountains. Next to this is Onchesmus,Santi Quaranta. another harbour, opposite to which are the western extremities of Corcyra,Corfu. and then again another port, Cassiope,Cassiopo. (Cassope?) whence to BrundusiumBrindisi. are 1700 stadia. It is the same distance to Tarentum from another promontory more to the south than Cassiope, which is called Phalacrum. Next af
and the countries which follow, lying below it, remain to be described. Among these are Greece, and the contiguous barbarous country extending to the mountains. Hecatæus of Miletus says of the Peloponnesus, that, before the time of the Greeks, it was inhabited by barbarians. Perhaps even the whole of Greece was, anciently, a settlement of barbarians, if we judge from former accounts. For Pelops brought colonists from Phrygia into the Peloponnesus, which took his name; DanausB. C. 1570. He was king of Argos. brought colonists from Egypt; Dry- opes, Caucones, Pelasgi, Leleges, and other barbarous nations, partitioned among themselves the country on this side of the isthmus.The Peloponnesus, which before the arrival of Pelops was called Apia. The case was the same on the other side of the isthmus; for Thracians, under their leader Eumolpus,Eumolpus took possession of Eleusis B. C. 1400. He is said to have there instituted the mysteries of Ceres. took possession of Attic