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five talents from the islanders subject to Athens, on condition that he should get the tribute payable by them reduced; when informed of this transaction, the knights compelled him to return the money. I was in ecstasy and I love the Knights for this deed; it is an honour to Greece.A hemistich borrowed from Euripides' Telephus. But the day when I was impatiently awaiting a piece by Aeschylus,The tragedies of Aeschylus continued to be played even after the poet's death, which occurred in 436 B.C., ten years before the production of The Acharnians. what tragic despair it caused me when the herald called, Theognis,A tragic poet, whose pieces were so devoid of warmth and life that he was nicknamed [the Greek for] snow. introduce your Chorus! Just imagine how this blow struck straight at my heart! On the other hand, what joy Dexitheus caused me at the musical competition, when he played a Boeotian melody on the lyre! But this year by contrast! Oh! what deadly torture to hear ChaerisA
They will never trouble themselves with the question of peace. Oh! Athens! Athens! As for myself, I do not fail to come here before all the rest, and now, finding myself alone, I groan, yawn, stretch, break wind, and know not what to do; I make sketches in the dust, pull out my loose hairs, muse, think of my fields, long for peace, curse town life and regret my dear country home,The Peloponnesian War had already, at the date of the representation of The Acharnians, lasted five years, 431-426 B.C.; driven from their lands by the successive Lacedaemonian invasions, the people throughout the country had been compelled to seek shelter behind the walls of Athens. which never told me to buy fuel, vinegar or oil; there the word buy, which cuts me in two, was unknown; I harvested everything at will. Therefore I have come to the assembly fully prepared to bawl, interrupt and abuse the speakers, if they talk of anything but peace. But here come the Prytanes, and high time too, for it is mid
Athens (Greece) (search for this): card 1
ghted in soul when Cleon had to disgorge those five talents;Cleon had received five talents from the islanders subject to Athens, on condition that he should get the tribute payable by them reduced; when informed of this transaction, the knights comph and fight each other for a seat in the front row. They will never trouble themselves with the question of peace. Oh! Athens! Athens! As for myself, I do not fail to come here before all the rest, and now, finding myself alone, I groan, yawn, strAthens! As for myself, I do not fail to come here before all the rest, and now, finding myself alone, I groan, yawn, stretch, break wind, and know not what to do; I make sketches in the dust, pull out my loose hairs, muse, think of my fields, long for peace, curse town life and regret my dear country home,The Peloponnesian War had already, at the date of the representcessive Lacedaemonian invasions, the people throughout the country had been compelled to seek shelter behind the walls of Athens. which never told me to buy fuel, vinegar or oil; there the word buy, which cuts me in two, was unknown; I harvested ever
Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 1
ntless as the grains of sand on the shore! Let me see! of what value to me have been these few pleasures? Ah! I remember that I was delighted in soul when Cleon had to disgorge those five talents;Cleon had received five talents from the islanders subject to Athens, on condition that he should get the tribute payable by them reduced; when informed of this transaction, the knights compelled him to return the money. I was in ecstasy and I love the Knights for this deed; it is an honour to Greece.A hemistich borrowed from Euripides' Telephus. But the day when I was impatiently awaiting a piece by Aeschylus,The tragedies of Aeschylus continued to be played even after the poet's death, which occurred in 436 B.C., ten years before the production of The Acharnians. what tragic despair it caused me when the herald called, Theognis,A tragic poet, whose pieces were so devoid of warmth and life that he was nicknamed [the Greek for] snow. introduce your Chorus! Just imagine how this blow stru
Thrace (Greece) (search for this): card 100
Aristophanes frequently holds him to scorn in his comedies. Behold the effrontery of this shaven rump! How! great baboon, with such a beard do you seek to play the eunuch to us? And this other one? Is it not Straton? frequently holds him to scorn in his comedies. HERALD Silence! Let all be seated. The Senate invites the King's Eye to the Prytaneum.Ambassadors were entertained there at the public expense. DICAEOPOLIS Is this not sufficient to drive one to hang oneself? Here I stand chilled to the bone, whilst the doors of the Prytaneum fly wide open to lodge such rascals. But I will do something great and bold. Where is Amphitheus? Come and speak with me. AMPHITHEUS Here I am. DICAEOPOLIS Take these eight drachmae and go and conclude a truce with the Lacedaemonians for me, my wife and my children; I leave you free, my dear citizens, to send out embassies and to stand gaping in the air. HERALD Bring in Theorus, who has returned from the Court of Sitalces.King of Thrace.
Attica (Greece) (search for this): card 1018
A HUSBANDMAN Ah! woe is me! DICAEOPOLIS Heracles! What have we here? HUSBANDMAN A most miserable man. DICAEOPOLIS Keep your misery for yourself. HUSBANDMAN Ah! friend! since you alone are enjoying peace, grant me a part of your truce, were it but five years. DICAEOPOLIS What has happened to you? HUSBANDMAN I am ruined; I have lost a pair of steers. DICAEOPOLIS How? HUSBANDMAN The Boeotians seized them at Phyle.A deme and frontier fortress of Attica, near the Boeotian border. DICAEOPOLIS Ah! poor wretch! and yet you have not left off white? HUSBANDMAN Their dung made my wealth. DICAEOPOLIS What can I do in the matter? HUSBANDMAN Crying for my beasts has lost me my eyesight. Ah! if you care for poor Dercetes of Phyle, anoint mine eyes quickly with your balm of peace. DICAEOPOLIS But, my poor fellow, I do not practise medicine. HUSBANDMAN Come, I adjure you; perhaps I shall recover my steers. DICAEOPOLIS 'Tis impossible; away, go and whine to the disciples of Pittalus.A
Phyle (Greece) (search for this): card 1018
d! since you alone are enjoying peace, grant me a part of your truce, were it but five years. DICAEOPOLIS What has happened to you? HUSBANDMAN I am ruined; I have lost a pair of steers. DICAEOPOLIS How? HUSBANDMAN The Boeotians seized them at Phyle.A deme and frontier fortress of Attica, near the Boeotian border. DICAEOPOLIS Ah! poor wretch! and yet you have not left off white? HUSBANDMAN Their dung made my wealth. DICAEOPOLIS What can I do in the matter? HUSBANDMAN Crying for my beasts has lost me my eyesight. Ah! if you care for poor Dercetes of Phyle, anoint mine eyes quickly with your balm of peace. DICAEOPOLIS But, my poor fellow, I do not practise medicine. HUSBANDMAN Come, I adjure you; perhaps I shall recover my steers. DICAEOPOLIS 'Tis impossible; away, go and whine to the disciples of Pittalus.An Athenian physician of the day. HUSBANDMAN Grant me but one drop of peace; pour it into this reedlet. DICAEOPOLIS No, not a particle; go a-weeping elsewhere. HUSBAN
Boeotia (Greece) (search for this): card 134
s not a grain of truth in it all! THEORUS And he has sent you the most warlike soldiers of all Thrace. DICAEOPOLIS Now we shall begin to see clearly. HERALD Come hither, Thracians, whom Theorus brought. DICAEOPOLIS What plague have we here? THEORUS 'Tis the host of the Odomanti.A Thracian tribe from the right bank of the Strymon. DICAEOPOLIS Of the Odomanti? Tell me what it means. Who has mutilated them like this? THEORUS If they are given a wage of two drachmae, they will put all BoeotiaThe Boeotians were the allies of Sparta. to fire and sword. DICAEOPOLIS Two drachmae to those circumcised hounds! Groan aloud, ye people of rowers, bulwark of Athens! Ah! great gods! I am undone; these Odomanti are robbing me of my garlic!Dicaeopolis had brought a clove of garlic with him to eat during the Assembly. Will you give me back my garlic? THEORUS Oh! wretched man! do not go near them; they have eaten garlicGarlic was given to game-cocks, before setting them at each other, to
Thrace (Greece) (search for this): card 134
THEORUS I am here. DICAEOPOLIS Another humbug! THEORUS We should not have remained long in Thrace... DICAEOPOLIS Forsooth, no, if you had not been well paid. THEORUS ...if the country had not been covered with snow; the rivers were ice-bound at the time that TheognisThe tragic poet. brought out his tragedy here; during the whole of that time I was holding my own with Sitalces, cup in hand; and, in truth, he adored you to such a degree, that he wrote on the walls, How beautiful are the Athenians would exclaim, What a cloud of grasshoppers! DICAEOPOLIS May I die if I believe a word of what you tell us! Excepting the grasshoppers, there is not a grain of truth in it all! THEORUS And he has sent you the most warlike soldiers of all Thrace. DICAEOPOLIS Now we shall begin to see clearly. HERALD Come hither, Thracians, whom Theorus brought. DICAEOPOLIS What plague have we here? THEORUS 'Tis the host of the Odomanti.A Thracian tribe from the right bank of the Strymon. DICAEOPOLI
Athens (Greece) (search for this): card 134
her, Thracians, whom Theorus brought. DICAEOPOLIS What plague have we here? THEORUS 'Tis the host of the Odomanti.A Thracian tribe from the right bank of the Strymon. DICAEOPOLIS Of the Odomanti? Tell me what it means. Who has mutilated them like this? THEORUS If they are given a wage of two drachmae, they will put all BoeotiaThe Boeotians were the allies of Sparta. to fire and sword. DICAEOPOLIS Two drachmae to those circumcised hounds! Groan aloud, ye people of rowers, bulwark of Athens! Ah! great gods! I am undone; these Odomanti are robbing me of my garlic!Dicaeopolis had brought a clove of garlic with him to eat during the Assembly. Will you give me back my garlic? THEORUS Oh! wretched man! do not go near them; they have eaten garlicGarlic was given to game-cocks, before setting them at each other, to give them pluck for the fight.. DICAEOPOLIS Prytanes, will you let me be treated in this manner, in my own country and by barbarians? But I oppose the discussion of p
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