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Bithynia (Turkey) (search for this): text comm, poem 10
was shown up wben attempting to put on airs about his supposed wealth acquired in Bithynia, whitber he went in 57 B.C. in the retinue of the governor Memmius (see Intr. 29fluence of the province upon the purse of Catullus. quid esset iam Bithynia: what sort of a place Bithynia is nowadays. Cf. Hor. Ep. 1.11.7 scisBithynia is nowadays. Cf. Hor. Ep. 1.11.7 scis Lebedus quid sit ; Gell. 4.1.12 hoc enim quis homo sit ostendere est, non, quid homo sit dicere. iam: not that the q natum: if Catullus means that the custom of riding in a litter originated in Bithynia, he tells us what we learn from no other source, —for the grammarian Probus, in one. hic: i.e. in Rome now. illic: i.e. in Bithynia then. grabati: (Gr. kra/bbatos) a Macedonian word for a be
Gell. 4.1.12 hoc enim quis homo sit ostendere est, non, quid homo sit dicere. iam: not that the questioners had any precise knowledge of, or interest in, the past history of Bithynia, but only that the news at hand is from a freshly returned traveler. Bithynia: the country was bequeathed to the Romans by Nicomedes III. in 74 B.C., and organized as a province. Western Pontus was added to it in 65 B.C., on the overthrow of Mithradates by Pompey. The united province was governed by propraetors till 27 B.C., when it was placed in the list of senatorial provinces, where it remained till the time of Trajan. Under the republic it could in no wise compare in importance with the neighboring province of Asia, being but thinly settled in the interior, and having only a scanty fringe of Greek culture along the
ntry was bequeathed to the Romans by Nicomedes III. in 74 B.C., and organized as a province. Western Pontus was added to it in 65 B.C., on the overthrow of Mithradates by Pompey. The united province was governed by propraetors till 27 B.C., when it was placed in the list of senatorial provinces, where it remained till the time of Trajan. Under the republic it could in no wise compare in importance with the neighboring province of Asia, being but thinly settled in the interior, and having only a scanty fringe of Greek culture along the coast. quo modo se haberet: how it is getting on. Cf. Ter. Phor. 820 ut meae res sese habent ; Cic. Att. 13.35.2 scire aveo quo modo res se habeat ; Tac. Ann. 14.51 ego me bene habeo . ecquonam: etc., whether I had made any mone
final a, cf. Pl. Cist. 573 commoda loquelam tuam (at the beginning of a trochaic septenarius); so also more commonly in colloquial usage such pyrrhic imperatives as ama, puta, roga, etc. Sarapim: an Egyptian deity, apparently at first identical with Osiris, and often later connected in worship with Isis. From Alexandria, where the great Sarapeum stood, the cult spread through Greece and Italy, reaching Rome perhaps as early as the time of Sulla, though it met there with great opposition, and did not attain its height till the end of the first century after Christ. In 58 B.C., only about two years before this poem was written, the worship of the Egyptian divinities had been banished without the city walls. Upon the Campus Martius, however, Isis and Sarapis found a resting-place, and their temples were much fr
Alexandria (Egypt) (search for this): text comm, poem 10
cknowledge himself a pretender. commoda: with the short final a, cf. Pl. Cist. 573 commoda loquelam tuam (at the beginning of a trochaic septenarius); so also more commonly in colloquial usage such pyrrhic imperatives as ama, puta, roga, etc. Sarapim: an Egyptian deity, apparently at first identical with Osiris, and often later connected in worship with Isis. From Alexandria, where the great Sarapeum stood, the cult spread through Greece and Italy, reaching Rome perhaps as early as the time of Sulla, though it met there with great opposition, and did not attain its height till the end of the first century after Christ. In 58 B.C., only about two years before this poem was written, the worship of the Egyptian divinities had been banished without the city walls. Upon the Campus Martius, how
tur cervice Syrorum. lecticam: a covered litter, borne on the shoulders of slaves (lecticarii), and used in Rome at first by women and children, but later by men also, as a vehicle in the city (where carriages were not allowed), and for short journeys llus: etc. — A confidential aside of the poet to the reader, i.e. but I hadn't, and never had had, a single one. hic: i.e. in Rome now. illic: i.e. in Bithynia then. grabati: (Gr. kra/bbatos) a Macedonian word for a bedstead. In later connected in worship with Isis. From Alexandria, where the great Sarapeum stood, the cult spread through Greece and Italy, reaching Rome perhaps as early as the time of Sulla, though it met there with great opposition, and did not attain its height till the end of the first c
Greece (Greece) (search for this): text comm, poem 10
h the short final a, cf. Pl. Cist. 573 commoda loquelam tuam (at the beginning of a trochaic septenarius); so also more commonly in colloquial usage such pyrrhic imperatives as ama, puta, roga, etc. Sarapim: an Egyptian deity, apparently at first identical with Osiris, and often later connected in worship with Isis. From Alexandria, where the great Sarapeum stood, the cult spread through Greece and Italy, reaching Rome perhaps as early as the time of Sulla, though it met there with great opposition, and did not attain its height till the end of the first century after Christ. In 58 B.C., only about two years before this poem was written, the worship of the Egyptian divinities had been banished without the city walls. Upon the Campus Martius, however, Isis and Sarapis found a resting-place, and their temples we
Campus Martius (Italy) (search for this): text comm, poem 10
Isis. From Alexandria, where the great Sarapeum stood, the cult spread through Greece and Italy, reaching Rome perhaps as early as the time of Sulla, though it met there with great opposition, and did not attain its height till the end of the first century after Christ. In 58 B.C., only about two years before this poem was written, the worship of the Egyptian divinities had been banished without the city walls. Upon the Campus Martius, however, Isis and Sarapis found a resting-place, and their temples were much frequented by the lower classes. Courtesans especially flocked to Isis, and invalids to Sarapis, whose priests were reputed to have wondrous powers of healing. But Sarapis may stand here for both divinities, and there is no need to suppose the girl was ill because of her professed destination or of her request for the use of a lectica. The spelling Sa