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et. Iul. 49. Romule: Caesar is apparently so termed because of his posing as the chief man of the state domi et militiae. et ille: etc. i.e. shall he come back to Italy newly enriched from the conquests in Gaul and Britain, and carry on more insolently than ever his life of debauchery? superbus et superfluens: both adjectives refer to his wealth. t wealth to be found in the interior of Britain, and many young Roman spendthrifts had desired to join Caesar's expedition there. He actually secured nothing of value, but evidently the true news had not yet spread through Italy. ista vestra mentula: of a debauchee, as Catul. 17.21 iste meus stupor , of a dull fellow. Mamurra is of course the man referred to (cf. Catul. 94.1ff., Catul. 105.1ff., Cat
Great Britain (United Kingdom) (search for this): text comm, poem 29
alienating the optimates; cf. Intr. 38. The poem was written after the first invasion of Britain (cf. vv. 4, 12, 20), which took place in 55 B.C., and during the lifetime of Juliatul. 11.11n. Caesar took command in Gaul in 58 B.C., and the first entry into Britain was made in the summer of 55 (cf. Caes. BG 4.20ff.). On the lengthening of the shall he come back to Italy newly enriched from the conquests in Gaul and Britain, and carry on more insolently than ever his life of debauchery? ildest rumors had long been afloat about the vast wealth to be found in the interior of Britain, and many young Roman spendthrifts had desired to join Caesar's expedition therorts have just arrived of the completed conquest of Gaul and of the invasion of Britain, and the same fate now threatens them that befell former conquests, —to be devo
Bithynia (Turkey) (search for this): text comm, poem 29
he question in this verse touches upon the fitness of giving such gifts; that in the next verse upon Mamurra's fitness to receive them. cf. Catul. 41.4; Catul. 43.5.. praeda Pontica: probably not that brought back by Pompey in 62 B.C. from the conquest of Mithradates, but that from the capture of Mitylene in 79 B.C., when Caesar was an officer in the army of the governor of Pontus and Bithynia. Thus early was the patrimony of Mamurra already squandered, and thus early, when gains were but small, did Caesar begin to lavish wealth upon him. Hibera: sc. praeda; when Caesar, in 61-60 B.C., governed Further Spain as propraetor. scit: is witness to; cf. Verg. A. 11.258 scelerum poenas expendimus omnes; … scit triste Minervae sidus ; Ov. Met. 12.439
non modo unius patrimonium sed urbes et regna devorare potuisset ; Vulg. Marc. 12.40 qui devorant ( Matt. 23.14 qui comeditis) domos viduarum. patrimonia: of the wealth that replaced the paterna bona (v. 17) first squandered. eone nomine: etc. i.e. was it for the sake of Mamurra's pockets that this last deal for the final ruin of Rome was made and cemented by a marriage? With this final appeal cf. Catul. 9.10n. urbis: etc. see Crit. App. socer generque: perhaps with a sneer at the political interests that dictated the marriage of Caesar's daughter to a man over twenty years her senior, who had lately divorced his wife on suspicion of adultery with Caesar himself. Yet the marriage had actually proved a very happy one o
rriage? With this final appeal cf. Catul. 9.10n. urbis: etc. see Crit. App. socer generque: perhaps with a sneer at the political interests that dictated the marriage of Caesar's daughter to a man over twenty years her senior, who had lately divorced his wife on suspicion of adultery with Caesar himself. Yet the marriage had actually proved a very happy one on both sides. perdidistis omnia: the familiar cry of the optimates at this time, when they had become more estranged from their former idol, Pompey, by events following upon the famous council of the so-called triumvirs at Luca in 56 B.C., in accordance with which Pompey and Crassus were this year consuls, with the government of Spain and Syria respectively to follow, while Caesar had just had his command in Gaul extended for five years.
riage? With this final appeal cf. Catul. 9.10n. urbis: etc. see Crit. App. socer generque: perhaps with a sneer at the political interests that dictated the marriage of Caesar's daughter to a man over twenty years her senior, who had lately divorced his wife on suspicion of adultery with Caesar himself. Yet the marriage had actually proved a very happy one on both sides. perdidistis omnia: the familiar cry of the optimates at this time, when they had become more estranged from their former idol, Pompey, by events following upon the famous council of the so-called triumvirs at Luca in 56 B.C., in accordance with which Pompey and Crassus were this year consuls, with the government of Spain and Syria respectively to follow, while Caesar had just had his command in Gaul extended for five years.
to lavish wealth upon him. Hibera: sc. praeda; when Caesar, in 61-60 B.C., governed Further Spain as propraetor. scit: is witness to; cf. Verg. A. 11.258 scelerum poenas expendimus omnes; … scit triste Minervae sidus ; Ov. Met. 12.439 ast ego … scit tuus hoc genitor—gladium spoliantis in ima ilia demisi. aurifer Tagus: the Tagus had a reputation like that of the Pactolus; cf. Ov. Am. 1.15.34 auriferi ripa a benigna Tagi ; Mart. 10.16.4 aurea divitis unda Tagi ; Mart. 10.96.3 auriferum Tagum. nunc: carrying on the series of prima … secunda … inde tertia; reports have just arrived of the completed conquest of Gaul and of the invasion of Britain, and the
tur, etc. The question in this verse touches upon the fitness of giving such gifts; that in the next verse upon Mamurra's fitness to receive them. cf. Catul. 41.4; Catul. 43.5.. praeda Pontica: probably not that brought back by Pompey in 62 B.C. from the conquest of Mithradates, but that from the capture of Mitylene in 79 B.C., when Caesar was an officer in the army of the governor of Pontus and Bithynia. Thus early was the patrimony of Mamurra already squandered, and thus early, when gains were but small, did Caesar begin to lavish wealth upon him. Hibera: sc. praeda; when Caesar, in 61-60 B.C., governed Further Spain as propraetor. scit: is witness to; cf. Verg. A. 11.258 scelerum poenas expendimus omnes; … scit triste Minervae sidus ; Ov.
riage? With this final appeal cf. Catul. 9.10n. urbis: etc. see Crit. App. socer generque: perhaps with a sneer at the political interests that dictated the marriage of Caesar's daughter to a man over twenty years her senior, who had lately divorced his wife on suspicion of adultery with Caesar himself. Yet the marriage had actually proved a very happy one on both sides. perdidistis omnia: the familiar cry of the optimates at this time, when they had become more estranged from their former idol, Pompey, by events following upon the famous council of the so-called triumvirs at Luca in 56 B.C., in accordance with which Pompey and Crassus were this year consuls, with the government of Spain and Syria respectively to follow, while Caesar had just had his command in Gaul extended for five years.
France (France) (search for this): text comm, poem 29
. ultima Britannia: cf. v.12; Catul. 11.11n. Caesar took command in Gaul in 58 B.C., and the first entry into Britain was made in the summer of 55 (cf. Caes. BG 4.20ff.). On et ille: etc. i.e. shall he come back to Italy newly enriched from the conquests in Gaul and Britain, and carry on more insolently than ever his life of debauchery? se series of prima … secunda … inde tertia; reports have just arrived of the completed conquest of Gaul and of the invasion of Britain, and the same fate now threatens them that befell former conquests, in 56 B.C., in accordance with which Pompey and Crassus were this year consuls, with the government of Spain and Syria respectively to follow, while Caesar had just had his command in Gaul extended for five years.