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improbo iracundior Hadria. The proper adjective is here used absolutely. insulas Cycladas: a place of danger to the mariner; cf. Hor. Carm. 1.14.19 interfusa nitentes vites aequora Cycladas . Rhodum nobilem: in more ancient times the island, with its commanding position and excellent harbor, had been a place of much commercial importance, and now its friendship with Rome, its delightful climate, and the residence there of distinguished teachers of philosophy and rhetoric had attracted large numbers of Romans; cf. Hor. Carm. 1.7.1 (and Mart. 4.55.6) claram Rhodon. horridam Propontida: another sea of bad reputation among sailors; cf. the early stories of the cruise of the Argo, and Val. Flac. Arg. 11.645 me fremens tumido circumfluat ore Prop
St. Elmo (New York, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 4
were often spoken of, sometimes even as if they were a single person, under one name, —that of Castor being more frequently used, as in v.27; cf. Hor. Ep. 17.42 Castor fraterque magni Castoris ; Stat. Silv. 4.6.15 ab Elysiis prospexit sedibus alter Castor; and the famous witticism of Bibulus in Suet. Iul. 10 evenisse sibi quod Polluci; ut enim geminis fratribus aedes in foro constituta tantum Castoris vocaretur, ita suam Caesarisque munificentiam unius Caesaris dici: but Hor. Carm. 3.29.64 has geminus Pollux.—The Dioscuri were invoked as dispellers of storms by sailors, who took the electrical phenomenon called still ‘St. Elmo's [= Helena's?] fires’ for the stars affixed in ancient art to the foreheads of the brothers; cf. Catul. 68.65 and other poets passim.
ent harbor, had been a place of much commercial importance, and now its friendship with Rome, its delightful climate, and the residence there of distinguished teachers of philosophy and rhetoric had attracted large numbers of Romans; cf. Hor. Carm. 1.7.1 (and Mart. 4.55.6) claram Rhodon. horridam Propontida: another sea of bad reputation among sailors; cf. the early stories of the cruise of the Argo, and Val. Flac. Arg. 11.645 me fremens tumido circumfluat ore Propontis; also of the adjacent strait, Hor. Carm. 3.4.30 insanientem navita Bosporum temptabo. On the lengthening of the final syllable, see Intr. 86g. trucem Ponticum sinum: cf. Ovid's account of the inhospitable sea in Ov. Trist. 4.4.56-60. post: a construction of adverb with substantive common
dere falce comam . But silva of a single tree, as apparentiy here, is a rare use. loquente coma: cf. the simpler and better figure in Verg. Ecl. 8.22 Maenalus pinos loquentes semper habet . Amastri: the city of Amastris, so named from its founder, the wife of Dionysius, tyrant of the Pontic Heraclea, was situated on the Paphiagonian coast of the Euxine Sea, not far from Mt. Cytorus, and on the site of the Homeric city of Sesamus (Hom. Il. 2.853). The younger Pliny praises its beauty (Plin. Trai. 98). Cytore buxifer: cf. Verg. G. 2.437 iuvat undantem buxo spectare Cytorum. The adjective is a(/pax lego/menon. tibi: Catullus combines Amastris and Cytorus in a single idea, perhaps thinking of the city as
ere, is a rare use. loquente coma: cf. the simpler and better figure in Verg. Ecl. 8.22 Maenalus pinos loquentes semper habet . Amastri: the city of Amastris, so named from its founder, the wife of Dionysius, tyrant of the Pontic Heraclea, was situated on the Paphiagonian coast of the Euxine Sea, not far from Mt. Cytorus, and on the site of the Homeric city of (Plin. Trai. 98). Cytore buxifer: cf. Verg. G. 2.437 iuvat undantem buxo spectare Cytorum. The adjective is a(/pax lego/menon. tibi: Catullus combines Amastris and Cytorus in a single idea, perhaps thinking of the city as built on the mountain; cf. v.18 n. stetisse: i.e. when a tree; imbuisse: i.e. when a ship. The course of the ship is now traced a
Bithynia (Turkey) (search for this): text comm, poem 4
A dedicatory inscription. — On the return of Catullus from Bithynia in 56 B.C. (see Intr. 33ff.) to his dearly loved home at Sirmio, he suspended as a votive offering in a shrine on his own property a model of the yacht that had brought him safely through his perils by sea, and this poem is in the form of a dedicatory inscription appended thereto. It is needless, not to say impossible, to suppose, as some have done, that the actual yacht was brought up the Po and the Mincio, or by an overland route, and beached in the Lago di Garda, but the votive model is spoken of as if the experiences of its prototype were its own. (For a strong presentation of a different interpretation of the poem cf. C. L. Smith, Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, vol. 3, p. 75.) Two other poems, Catul. 46.1 and Catul. 31.1, speak respectively of the beginning and end of the homeward journey. A
A dedicatory inscription. — On the return of Catullus from Bithynia in 56 B.C. (see Intr. 33ff.) to his dearly loved home at Sirmio, he suspended as a votive offering in a shrine on his own property a model of the yacht that had brought him safely through his perils by sea, and this poem i: i.e. when a tree; imbuisse: i.e. when a ship. The course of the ship is now traced again, but in the original direction, from Cytorus to Sirmio. inde: perhaps a case of poetic freedom with fact, for Catullus was more likely to start on his homeward journey from Nicaea limpidum lacum: i.e. the lacus Benacus (Lago di Garda), into the broader, southern end of which projects the peninsula of Sirmio (cf. Catul. 31.1ff.), now Sermione, where stood the villa of Catullus. In the epithet is a thought of the contrast between the dark and t
the return of Catullus from Bithynia in 56 B.C. (see Intr. 33ff.) to his dearly loved home at Sirmio, he suspended as a votive offering in a shrine on his own property a model of the yacht that had brought him safely through his perils by sea, and this poem is in the form of a dedicatory inscription appended thereto. It is needless, not to say impossible, to suppose, as some have done, that the actual yacht was brought up the Po and the Mincio, or by an overland route, and beached in the Lago di Garda, but the votive model is spoken of as if the experiences of its prototype were its own. (For a strong presentation of a different interpretation of the poem cf. C. L. Smith, Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, vol. 3, p. 75.) Two other poems, Catul. 46.1 and Catul. 31.1, speak respectively of the beginning and end of the homeward journey. A parody is found in Verg. Catal. 8, and
form of a dedicatory inscription appended thereto. It is needless, not to say impossible, to suppose, as some have done, that the actual yacht was brought up the Po and the Mincio, or by an overland route, and beached in the Lago di Garda, but the votive model is spoken of as if the experiences of its prototype were its own. (For a strong presentation of a different interpretation of the poem cf. C. L. Smith, Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, nt sea; cf. Ov. Trist. 3.13.27 terrarum pars paene novissima, Pontus ; Tac. Agr. 10 oram novissimi maris. limpidum lacum: i.e. the lacus Benacus (Lago di Garda), into the broader, southern end of which projects the peninsula of Sirmio (cf. Catul. 31.1ff.), now Sermione, where stood the villa of Catullus. In the epithet is a thought of the contrast between the dar
Helena (Montana, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 4
were often spoken of, sometimes even as if they were a single person, under one name, —that of Castor being more frequently used, as in v.27; cf. Hor. Ep. 17.42 Castor fraterque magni Castoris ; Stat. Silv. 4.6.15 ab Elysiis prospexit sedibus alter Castor; and the famous witticism of Bibulus in Suet. Iul. 10 evenisse sibi quod Polluci; ut enim geminis fratribus aedes in foro constituta tantum Castoris vocaretur, ita suam Caesarisque munificentiam unius Caesaris dici: but Hor. Carm. 3.29.64 has geminus Pollux.—The Dioscuri were invoked as dispellers of storms by sailors, who took the electrical phenomenon called still ‘St. Elmo's [= Helena's?] fires’ for the stars affixed in ancient art to the foreheads of the brothers; cf. Catul. 68.65 and other poets passim.
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