hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rome (Italy) 52 0 Browse Search
Rome (Italy) 34 0 Browse Search
Bithynia (Turkey) 34 0 Browse Search
Bithynia (Turkey) 24 0 Browse Search
Verona (Italy) 24 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Verona (Italy) 22 0 Browse Search
Great Britain (United Kingdom) 18 0 Browse Search
Italy (Italy) 16 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). Search the whole document.

Found 27 total hits in 5 results.

Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 45
.45. pote: for potest; cf. Catul. 17.24n. perire: usually with the person loved as direct object; cf. Pl. Poen. 1095earum hic alteram efflictim perit (cf. deperire in Catul. 35.12; Catul. 100.2); or as instrumental ablative, a construction common in he Augustan poets. solus: etc. cf. Hor. Carm. 3.27.51 utinam inter nuda leones . Libya: i.e. Africa; on its lions cf. Hor. Carm. 1.22.15 Iubae tellus, leonum arida nutrix ; Plin. NH 6.195. India tosta: cf. Verg. G. 4.425 rapidus [rabidus?] torrens sitientis Sirius Indos ardebat caelo ; Tib. 2.3.55 comites fusci, quos India torret. caesio leoni: cf. Hom. Il. 20.172 [le/wn] glaudio/wn d' i)qu\s fe/retai me/nei
Ellis (Texas, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 45
lions cf. Hor. Carm. 1.22.15 Iubae tellus, leonum arida nutrix ; Plin. NH 6.195. India tosta: cf. Verg. G. 4.425 rapidus [rabidus?] torrens sitientis Sirius Indos ardebat caelo ; Tib. 2.3.55 comites fusci, quos India torret. caesio leoni: cf. Hom. Il. 20.172 [le/wn] glaudio/wn d' i)qu\s fe/retai me/nei ; Ellis quotes Plin. NH 8.54 leonum omnis vis constat in oculis. (= 17-18). The reading seems correct as it stands here, so far as the contrast of sinistra and dextra is concerned, but a satisfactory interpretation of sinistra ut ante is impossible. Sneezing was apparently a good omen, however occurring, and there is no indication that Amor had sneezed before at all, or that he
anniasque: the allusion suggests that the poem was composed in 55 B.C., for in that year Caesar invaded Britain and Crassus took command in Syria. Syria was proverbially a country of great wealth, and Britain was supposed to be so till the expedition of Caesar proved it otherwise (cf.Syria was proverbially a country of great wealth, and Britain was supposed to be so till the expedition of Caesar proved it otherwise (cf. Cic. Fam. 7.7.1 in Britannia nihil esse audio neque auri neque argenti (to Trebatius after the expedition); Att. 4.16.7 Britannici belli exitus exspectatur; … etiam illud iam cognitum est, neque argenti scripulum esse ullum in illa insula neque praedae nisi ex mancipiis ). The plural is used to indicate, not the several parts of the countries themselves, but such rich countries as Syria and Britain; cf. Prop. 3.16.10 alias Illyrias . facit: etc. i.e. centres all her affections.
Amor (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 45
u\s fe/retai me/nei ; Ellis quotes Plin. NH 8.54 leonum omnis vis constat in oculis. (= 17-18). The reading seems correct as it stands here, so far as the contrast of sinistra and dextra is concerned, but a satisfactory interpretation of sinistra ut ante is impossible. Sneezing was apparently a good omen, however occurring, and there is no indication that Amor had sneezed before at all, or that he had ever been unpropitious (sinister) toward the lovers. Ut ante may be corrupt, but none of the emendations proposed (see Crit. App.) are at all satisfactory. Bonnet suggests that the difficulty may lie in our lack of detailed knowledge of the interpretation of this omen among the ancients. sternuit adprobationem: sneezing was early regarded as a good omen; cf. Hom. Od. 17.541ff.;
Great Britain (United Kingdom) (search for this): text comm, poem 45
ul. 51.5. Syrias Britanniasque: the allusion suggests that the poem was composed in 55 B.C., for in that year Caesar invaded Britain and Crassus took command in Syria. Syria was proverbially a country of great wealth, and Britain was supposed to be so till the exBritain was supposed to be so till the expedition of Caesar proved it otherwise (cf. Cic. Fam. 7.7.1 in Britannia nihil esse audio neque auri neque argenti (to Trebatius after the expedition); Att. 4.16.7 Britannici belli exitus exspectatur; … etiam illud iam cognitum est, neque argenti scripulumncipiis ). The plural is used to indicate, not the several parts of the countries themselves, but such rich countries as Syria and Britain; cf. Prop. 3.16.10 alias Illyrias . facit: etc. i.e. centres all her affections. de