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Athens (Greece) (search for this): text comm, poem 64
. dicuntur. Androgeoneae caedis: Androgeos, son of Minos and Pasiphae, conquered all his competitors at wrestling in Athens, and was through jealousy assassinated while on his way to the games at Thebes. According to another story, King Aegeus himself caused his death band 121. divae: the use of the unmodified noun to indicate Athena seems to be made possible by the unmistakable reference to Athens in v. 211 Erechtheum portum. incundior vita: cf. Catul. 68.106 ita dulcius atque anima ; and on similtc. Theseus passed his early life with his mother Aethra in the home of her father Pittheos, king of Troezene, and when he finally came to Athens, found Aegeus already an old man. fine: feminine, as regularly in Lucretius, and not very infrequently in other writ
tu separatis uvidus in iugis nodo coerces viperino Bistonidum sine fraude crines ; Ov. Met. 4.483 [Tisiphone] torto incingitur angue . obscura: etc. cf. Hor. Carm. 1.18.12 nec variis obsita frondibus sub divum rapiam (addressing Bassareus). The cista was either a cylindrical basket or a box, in which the secret emblems (orgia) of the worship of Bacchus, or of Ceres, were concealed from uninitiated eyes when carried in procession (celebrabant). plangebant: etc. cf. Catul. 63.21n.; Lucr. 2.618ff. tympana tenta tonant palmis et cymbala circum concava, raucisonoque minantur cornua cantu, et Phrygio stimulat numero cava tibia mentis . proceris: perhaps with the unusu
California (California, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 64
Cf. Verg. Ecl. 4.40f. non rastros patietur humus, non vinea falcem; robustus quoque iam tauris iuga solvet arator . humilis vinea: here, as, according to Varro RR 1.8, in Spain and some parts of Asia, the vines were not trained on trees, but either ran along the ground or were so cut as to be kept low. The latter plan is followed to-day in the great vineyards of California, and to some extent in Italy itself. curvis: perhaps referring to the crescent-shaped iron, the two points of which form the teeth of the rastrum pictured in Rich's Dict. Ant. s.v. rastris: the rastrum was a heavy sort of rake of from two to four strong iron teeth, used to break up clods and to loosen the surface of the ground. prono: of the point of the share
Sigean (France) (search for this): text comm, poem 64
course of the siege betrothed on pretence of peace to Achilles, was at the capture of the city sacrificed to his manes by Pyrrhus; cf. Ov. Met. 13.439ff.; Serv. on Verg. A. 3.321; Hyg. Fab. 110; Eur. Hec. 37ff.; Eur. Hec. 521ff. teres: round, i.e. circular; cf. v. 314. bustum: Servius and Hyginus apparently think of the tomb of Achilles as on the Sigean shore; Ovid, following Euripides, has in mind a cenotaph on the shore of Thrace. copiam: with a dependent infinitive, solvere; cf. Sall. Cat. 17.6 molliter vivere copia ; Verg. A. 9.483 te adfari data copia. Neptunia: i.e. built by Neptune. solvere vincla: cf. Hom. Il. 16.100 o)/fr' oi)=oi Troi/hs i(era
Galatea (Ohio, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 64
ar ; Hor. Carm. 2.9.10 nec tibi Vespero surgente decedunt amores ; Verg. Ecl. 9.56 nostros in longum ducis amores. tenuit: sc. complexu; cf. Catul. 72.2; but otherwise in Catul. 11.18; Catul. 55.17. Nereine: Gr. *nhrhi/+nh; but elsewhere the Latins use either Nereis (cf. v. 15) or Nerine (cf. Verg. Ecl. 7.37 Nerine Galatea ). Tethys: the daughter of Uranus and Ge, and the wife of her own brother Oceanus, by whom she became the mother of the sea-nymphs called Oceanides, of the rivers of earth, and of Nereus. From the marriage of Nereus with his sister Doris, one of the Oceanides, sprang the sea-nymphs called Nereides, of whom the most famous were Thetis, Amphitrite, the wife of Poseidon, and Galatea, the beloved of Polyphemus
Boeotia (Greece) (search for this): text comm, poem 64
; Paus. 10.4.3 ai( de\ *quia/des gunai=kes me/n ei)sin *)attikai/, foitw=sai de\ e)s to\n *parnasso\n para\ e)/tos au)tai/ te kai\ ai( gunai=kes *delfw=n a)/gousin o)/rgia *dionu/sw| . Mavors: antique and poetic form for Mars. rapidi Tritonis hera: i.e. Athena, called *tritoge/neia by Hom. Il. 8.39, etc., probably from the river Triton in Boeotia (Strab. IX. 407; Paus. 9.33.7), rather than from the lake, or river, Triton in Libya (Hdt. 4.178; Plin. NH 5.28). Rhamnusia virgo: i.e. Nemesis, so called from her famous temple at Rhamnus in Attica; cf. Catul. 66.71; Catul. 68.77; Ov. Met. 3.406 adsensit precibus Rhamnusia iustis ; Stat. Silv. 3.5.5 audiat infesto licet hoc Rhamnusia vultu
Phocis (Greece) (search for this): text comm, poem 64
heroic times. revisens: if the correct reading, probably used absolutely; cf. the ordinary use of revisere with ad. annua: etc. doubtless a typical occasion only, rather than a known festival. vagus: often used of the aimless, frenzied rushing to and fro of the god's followers; cf. Catul. 63.13, Catul. 63.86. Parnasi: this famous mountain of Phocis, the haunt of the gods, rose just behind Delphi. effusis: etc. cf. the descripion of the Bacchic rout in vv. 254ff.; Ov. Fast. 6.514 Thyiades, effusis per sua colla comis . Delphi: i.e. the inhabitants of the city; cf. Just. 24.7.8 urbem suam Delphi aucti viribus sociorum permuniucre , and Grk. *delfoi/ often. The city was early connected with
cf. Verg. A. 5.859 liquidas proiecit in undas praecipitem ; Nemes. Buc. 2.76 nec tremulum liquidis lumen splenderet in undis. nasse: cf. Catul. 4.3 natantis trabis ; Catul. 66.45 iuventus per medium navit Athon . Phasidos: the chief river of Colchis, rising in the Caucasus and flowing into the Euxine Sea at its eastern end. Aceteos: Gr. *ai)htei/ous: Aeetes was king of Colchis and father of Medea. lecti iuuenes: so the Argonauts are called by Ennius Med. Exsul 209 R. Argivi delecti viri ) and Verg. Ecl. 4.34 altera quae vehat Argo delectos heroas ); cf. also Theocr. 13.18 pasa=n e)k poli/wn prolelegme/noi (of the A
n earlier name for Naxos. But Hom. Od. 11.321ff.) very probably thought of the island of Dia that lies very near the north coast of Crete, whence the tradition may have been transferred to Naxos, the favorite haunt of Dionysus, as the later story of Ariadne's rescue by Dionysus gainedle, the first, because of her isolation from home, the other two, because also of her past deeds. Idaeos montes: i.e. Crete, the thought being simply of returning home. sperem: sc. even if I could reach Crete. quemne: = Crete. quemne: = quippe quem; cf. v. 183; Catul. 68.91. The interrogative particle -ne is not infrequently joined to relatives to point the reason for controverting a previous assertion, or for answering in the negative a previous question; cf. Pl. Trin. 360 quin comedit quod fuit, quod non
Attica (Greece) (search for this): text comm, poem 64
Mavors: antique and poetic form for Mars. rapidi Tritonis hera: i.e. Athena, called *tritoge/neia by Hom. Il. 8.39, etc., probably from the river Triton in Boeotia (Strab. IX. 407; Paus. 9.33.7), rather than from the lake, or river, Triton in Libya (Hdt. 4.178; Plin. NH 5.28). Rhamnusia virgo: i.e. Nemesis, so called from her famous temple at Rhamnus in Attica; cf. Catul. 66.71; Catul. 68.77; Ov. Met. 3.406 adsensit precibus Rhamnusia iustis ; Stat. Silv. 3.5.5 audiat infesto licet hoc Rhamnusia vultu . Ares and Athena often encourage men to battle in the Iliad, but this function on the part of Nemesis is nowhere else mentioned. Perhaps it is from an unknown Alexandrian source, or else the conjecture of Baehrens is right (Amarunsia vir
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