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Athens (Greece) (search for this): poem 64
y bosom, What while issuing fierce with will enstarkened, Theseus Forth from the bow-bent shore Piraean putting a-seawards Reacht the Gortynian roofs where dwelt the injurious Monarch. For 'twas told of yore how forced by pestilence cruel, Eke as a blood rite due for the Androgeonian murder, Many a chosen youth and the bloom of damsels unmarried Food for the Minotaur, Cecropia was wont to befurnish. Seeing his narrow walls in such wise vexed with evils, Theseus of freest will for dear-loved Athens his body Offered a victim so that no more to Crete be deported Lives by Cecropia doomed to burials burying nowise; Then with a swifty ship and soft breathed breezes a-stirring, Sought he Minos the Haughty where homed in proudest of Mansions. Him as with yearning glance forthright espied the royal Maiden, whom pure chaste couch aspiring delicate odours Cherisht, in soft embrace of a mother comforted all-whiles, (E'en as the myrtles begot by the flowing floods of Eurotas, Or as the tincts dist
Troy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): poem 64
ng, speed ye, 0 Spindles. 4. Born of yon twain shall come Achilles guiltless of fear-sense, Known by his forceful breast and ne'er by back to the foeman, Who shall at times full oft in doubtful contest of race-course Conquer the fleet-foot doe with slot-tracks smoking and burning. Speed ye, the well-spun woof out-drawing, speed ye, 0 Spindles. 5. None shall with him compare, howe'er war-doughty a hero, Whenas the Phrygian rills flow deep with bloodshed of Teucer, And beleaguering the walls of Troy with longest of warfare He shall the works lay low, third heir of Pelops the perjured. Speed ye, the well-spun woof out-drawing, speed ye, 0 Spindles. 6. His be the derring-do and deeds of valour egregious, Often mothers shall own at funeral-rites of their children, What time their hoary hairs from head in ashes are loosened, And wi' their hands infirm thay smite their bosoms loose duggèd. Speed ye, the well-spun woof out-drawing, speed ye, 0 Spindles. 7. For as the toiling hind bestrewing de
Pelion (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): poem 64
s slantingly fretted— Rising Aurora the while 'neath Sol the wanderer's threshold— Tardy at first they flow by the clement breathing of breezes Urged, and echo the shores with soft-toned ripples of laughter, But as the winds wax high so waves wax higher and higher, Flashing and floating afar to outswim morn's purpurine splendours,— So did the crowd fare forth, the royal vestibule leaving, And to their house each wight with vaguing paces departed. After their wending, the first, foremost from Pelion's summit, Chiron came to the front with woodland presents surcharged: Whatso of blooms and flowers bring forth Thessalian uplands Mighty with mountain crests, whate'er of riverine lea flowers Reareth Favonius' air, bud-breeding, tepidly breathing, All in his hands brought he, unseparate in woven garlands, Whereat laughed the house as soothed by pleasure of perfume. Presently Péneus appears, deserting verdurous Tempe— Tempe girt by her belts of greenwood ever impending, Left for the Mamonid
Thessaly (Greece) (search for this): poem 64
ll hail!) of the gods begotten, and excellent issue Bred by your mothers, all hail! and placid deal me your favour. Oft with the sound of me, in strains and spells I'll invoke you; You too by wedding-torch so happily, highly augmented, Peleus, Thessaly's ward, in whose favor Jupiter himself, The Father of the gods, resigned his passions. You Thetis, fairest of maids Nereian, vouchsafed to marry? You did Tethys empower to woo and wed with her grandchild; Nor less Oceanus, with water compassing th' Earth-globe? But when ended the term, and wisht-for light of the day-tide Uprose, flocks to the house in concourse mighty, convened, Thessaly all, with glad assembly the Palace fulfilling: Presents afore they bring, and joy in faces declare they. Cieros abides a desert: they quit Phthiotican Tempe, Homesteads of Crannon-town, eke bulwarkt walls Larissa; Meeting at Pharsalus, and roof Pharsalian seeking. None will the fields now till; soft wax all necks the oxen, Never the humble vine is purg
Parnassus (Virginia, United States) (search for this): poem 64
eleus' fate foretelling Chaunted from breasts divine prophetic verse the Parcae. For that the pure chaste homes of heroes to visit in person Oft-tide the Gods, and themselves to display where mortals were gathered, Wont were the Heavenlies while none human piety spurned. Often the Deities' Sire, in fulgent temple a-dwelling, Whenas in festal days received he his annual worship, Looked upon hundreds of bulls felled prone on pavement before him. Full oft Liber who roamed from topmost peak of Parnassus Hunted his howling host, his Thyiads with tresses dishevelled. Then with contending troops from all their city outflocking Gladly the Delphians hailed their God with smoking of altars. Often in death-full war and bravest of battle, or Mavors Or rapid Triton's Queen or eke the Virgin Rhamnusian, Bevies of weaponed men exhorting, proved their presence. But from the time when earth was stained with unspeakable scandals And forth fro' greeding breasts of all men justice departed, Then did the
Pharsalus (Greece) (search for this): poem 64
an, vouchsafed to marry? You did Tethys empower to woo and wed with her grandchild; Nor less Oceanus, with water compassing th' Earth-globe? But when ended the term, and wisht-for light of the day-tide Uprose, flocks to the house in concourse mighty, convened, Thessaly all, with glad assembly the Palace fulfilling: Presents afore they bring, and joy in faces declare they. Cieros abides a desert: they quit Phthiotican Tempe, Homesteads of Crannon-town, eke bulwarkt walls Larissa; Meeting at Pharsalus, and roof Pharsalian seeking. None will the fields now till; soft wax all necks the oxen, Never the humble vine is purged by curve of the rake-tooth, Never a pruner's hook thins out the shade of the tree-tufts, Never a bull up-plows broad glebe with bend of the coulter, Over whose point unuse displays the squalor of rust-stain. But in the homestead's heart, where'er that opulent palace Hides a retreat, all shines with splendour of gold and of silver. Ivory blanches the seats, bright gleam
Argive (Greece) (search for this): poem 64
Marriage of Peleus and Thetis Pine-trees gendered whilome upon soaring Peliac summit Swam (as the tale is told) through liquid surges of Neptune Far as the Phasis-flood and frontier-land Aeetean; Whenas the youths elect, of Argive vigour the oak-heart, Longing the Golden Fleece of the Colchis-region to harry, Dared in a poop swift-paced to span salt seas and their shallows, Sweeping the deep blue seas with sweeps a-carven of fir-wood. She, that governing Goddess of citadels crowning the cities, Builded herself their car fast-flitting with lightest of breezes, Weaving plants of the pine conjoined in curve of the kelson; Foremost of all to imbue rude Amphitrite with ship-lore. Soon as her beak had burst through wind-rackt spaces of ocean, While the oar-tortured wave with spumy whiteness was blanching, Surged from the deep abyss and hoar-capped billows the faces Seaborn, Nereids eyeing the prodigy wonder-smitten. There too mortal orbs through softened spendours regarded Ocean-nymphs w
Crete (Greece) (search for this): poem 64
ened, Theseus Forth from the bow-bent shore Piraean putting a-seawards Reacht the Gortynian roofs where dwelt the injurious Monarch. For 'twas told of yore how forced by pestilence cruel, Eke as a blood rite due for the Androgeonian murder, Many a chosen youth and the bloom of damsels unmarried Food for the Minotaur, Cecropia was wont to befurnish. Seeing his narrow walls in such wise vexed with evils, Theseus of freest will for dear-loved Athens his body Offered a victim so that no more to Crete be deported Lives by Cecropia doomed to burials burying nowise; Then with a swifty ship and soft breathed breezes a-stirring, Sought he Minos the Haughty where homed in proudest of Mansions. Him as with yearning glance forthright espied the royal Maiden, whom pure chaste couch aspiring delicate odours Cherisht, in soft embrace of a mother comforted all-whiles, (E'en as the myrtles begot by the flowing floods of Eurotas, Or as the tincts distinct brought forth by breath of the springtide) Nev
Idalium (Cyprus) (search for this): poem 64
a mother comforted all-whiles, (E'en as the myrtles begot by the flowing floods of Eurotas, Or as the tincts distinct brought forth by breath of the springtide) Never the burning lights of her eyes from gazing upon him Turned she, before fierce flame in all her body conceived she Down in its deepest depths and burning within her marrow. Ah, with unmitigate heart exciting wretchedmost furies, You, Boy sacrosanct! man's grief and gladness commingling, You too of Golgos Queen and Lady of leafy Idalium, Whelm'd you in what manner waves that maiden fantasy-fired, All for a blond-haired youth suspiring many a singulf! Whiles how dire was the dread she dreed in languishing heart-strings; How yet more, ever more, with golden splendour she paled! Whenas yearning to mate his might with the furious monster Theseus braved his death or sought the prizes of praises. Then of her gifts to gods not ingrate, nor profiting naught, Promise with silent lip, addressed she timidly vowing. For as an oak that