hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Troy (Turkey) 82 0 Browse Search
Jupiter (Canada) 60 0 Browse Search
Juno (North Carolina, United States) 44 0 Browse Search
Crete (Greece) 36 0 Browse Search
Jupiter (Florida, United States) 32 0 Browse Search
Latona (California, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Ceres (Italy) 28 0 Browse Search
Hercules (Pennsylvania, United States) 26 0 Browse Search
Cyclops (Arizona, United States) 26 0 Browse Search
Cygnus (California, United States) 26 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 2 results.

Pallas (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): book 12, card 316
ed success. He struggled with vast effort to tear up an old pine, trunk and all, with its long roots, and, failing shortly in that first attempt, he broke it off and hurled it at his foe. But Theseus saw the pine tree in its flight and, warned by Pallas, got beyond its range— his boast was, Pallas had directed him! And yet, the missle was not launched in vain. It sheared the left shoulder and the breast from tall Crantor. He, Achilles, was your father's armor bearer and was given by King AmyntorPallas had directed him! And yet, the missle was not launched in vain. It sheared the left shoulder and the breast from tall Crantor. He, Achilles, was your father's armor bearer and was given by King Amyntor, when he sued for peace. “When Peleus at a distance saw him torn and mangled, he exclaimed, ‘At least receive this sacrifice, O Crantor! most beloved! Dearest of young men!’ And with sturdy arm and all his strength of soul as well, he hurled his ashen lance against Demoleon, which piercing through his shivered ribs, hung there and quivered in the bones. The centaur wrenched the wooden shaft out, with his frenzied hands, but could not move the pointed head, which stuck within his lungs. His ver
Myles (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): book 12, card 316
wooden shaft out, with his frenzied hands, but could not move the pointed head, which stuck within his lungs. His very anguish gave him such a desperation, that he rose against his foe and trampled and beat down the hero with his hoofs, Peleus allowed the blows to fall on helm and ringing shield. Protected so, he watched his time and thrust up through the centaur's shoulder. By one stroke he pierced two breasts, where horse and man-form met. Before this, Peleus with the spear had killed both Myles and Phlegraeus and with the sword Iphinous and Clanis. Now he killed Dorylas, who was clad in a wolfskin cap and fought with curving bull's horns dripping blood. “To him I said, for courage gave me strength, ‘Your horns! how much inferior to my steel!’— and threw my spear. Since he could not avoid the gleaming point, he held up his right hand to shield his forehead from the threatened wound. His hand was pierced and pinned against his forehead. He shouted madly. Peleus, near him while he st