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Browsing named entities in a specific section of P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). Search the whole document.

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Troy (Turkey) (search for this): book 13, card 1
Ulysses hoped. But he has won reward enough already. He can boast, when vanquished, that he strove with me. “I, even if my merit were in doubt should still excell in birth. I am the son of Telamon, who with great Hercules brought low the power of Troy and in the ship of Jason voyaged even to the Colchian shores. His father, Aeacus, now is a judge among the silent shades—where Sisyphus toils and is mocked forever with the stone. Great Jove himself calls Aeacus his son. Thus, Ajax is the third frn to the same arms with ourselves! by whom the arrows of great Hercules are used, as his successor; broken by disease and famine, clothed with feathers, now must feed on birds and squander for his wretched fare the arrows destined for the wreck of Troy. “At least he lives, because he has not stayed too near Ulysses. Hapless Palamedes might wish that he too had been left behind, then he would live or would have met a death without dishonor. For this man, who well remembered the unfortunate discov<
Hector (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): book 13, card 1
with fear, and shuddering, at the thought of coming death. I held my shield above him where he lay, and that way saved the villain's dastard life, and little praise I have deserved for that. If you still wish to claim this armor, let us both return to that place and restore the enemy, your wound, and usual fear— there hide behind my shield, and under that contend with me! Yet, when I faced the foe, he, whom his wound had left no power to stand, forgot the wound and took to headlong flight. “Hector approached, and brought the gods with him to battle; and, wherever he rushed on, not only this Ulysses was alarmed, but even the valiant, for so great the fear he caused them. Hector, proud in his success in blood and slaughter, I then dared to meet and with a huge: stone from a distance hurled I laid him flat. When he demanded one to fight with, I engaged him quite alone, for you my Greek friends, prayed the lot might fall upon me, and your prayers prevailed. If you should ask me of this fi
Lemnos (Greece) (search for this): book 13, card 1
aplius more shrewd than he (but to his future cost) discovered the contrivance of the fraud and had the coward dragged forth to the arms he had avoided. And shall this man have the world's best arms, who wanted none? Shall I lack honor and my cousin's gift because I faced the danger with the first? “Would that his madness had been real, or had been accepted as reality and that he never had attended us, as our companion to the Phrygian towers, this counsellor of evil! Then, good son of Poeas, Lemnos would not hold you now, exposed through guilt of ours! You, as men say, hidden in forest lairs, are moving with your groans the very rocks and asking for Ulysses what he so well deserves—what, if indeed there still are gods, you shall not ask in vain. And now, one of our leaders, he that was sworn to the same arms with ourselves! by whom the arrows of great Hercules are used, as his successor; broken by disease and famine, clothed with feathers, now must feed on birds and squander for his wr
Ulysses (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): book 13, card 1
d that way saved the villain's dastard life, and little praise I have deserved for that. If you still wish to claim this armor, let us both return to that place and restore the enemy, your wound, and usual fear— there hide behind my shield, and under that contend with me! Yet, when I faced the foe, he, whom his wound had left no power to stand, forgot the wound and took to headlong flight. “Hector approached, and brought the gods with him to battle; and, wherever he rushed on, not only this Ulysses was alarmed, but even the valiant, for so great the fear he caused them. Hector, proud in his success in blood and slaughter, I then dared to meet and with a huge: stone from a distance hurled I laid him flat. When he demanded one to fight with, I engaged him quite alone, for you my Greek friends, prayed the lot might fall upon me, and your prayers prevailed. If you should ask me of this fight, I will declare I was not vanquished there by him. “Behold, the Trojans brought forth fire and swo<