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Vulcan (Romania) (search for this): book 13, card 313
“Nor am I to be blamed, if Vulcan's isle of Lemnos has become the residence of Philoctetes. Greeks, defend yourselves, for you agreed to it! Yes, I admit I urged him to withdraw from toils of war and those of travel and attempt by rest to ease his cruel pain. He took my advice and lives! The advice was not alone well meant (that would have been enough) but it was wise. Because our prophets have declared, he must lead us, if we may still maintain our hope for Troy's destruction—therefore, you must not intrust that work to me. Much better, send the son of Telamon. His eloquence will overcome the hero's rage, most fierce from his disease and anger: or else his invention of some wile will skilfully deliver him to us.—The Simois will first flow backward, Ida stand without its foliage, and Achaia promise aid to Troy itself; ere, lacking aid from me, the craft of stupid Ajax will avail. “Though, Philoctetes, you should be enraged against your friends, against the king and me; although you c
red, he must lead us, if we may still maintain our hope for Troy's destruction—therefore, you must not intrust that work to d, Ida stand without its foliage, and Achaia promise aid to Troy itself; ere, lacking aid from me, the craft of stupid Ajax r my captive, as I learned the heavenly oracles and fate of Troy, and as I brought back through a host of foes Minerva's ima may now compare himself with me? Truly the Fates will hold Troy from our capture, if we leave the statue. Where is valiant hostile swords, he goes within not only the strong walls of Troy but even the citadel, lifts up the goddess from her shrine,en bull hides in vain. That night I gained the victory over Troy— 'Twas then I won our war with Pergama, because I made it pture Pergama, have captured it. Now by our common hopes, by Troy's high walls already tottering and about to fall, and by th bold and fearless deeds— if you think any hope is left for Troy, remember me! Or, if you do not give these arms to me, then<
Lemnos (Greece) (search for this): book 13, card 313
“Nor am I to be blamed, if Vulcan's isle of Lemnos has become the residence of Philoctetes. Greeks, defend yourselves, for you agreed to it! Yes, I admit I urged him to withdraw from toils of war and those of travel and attempt by rest to ease his cruel pain. He took my advice and lives! The advice was not alone well meant (that would have been enough) but it was wise. Because our prophets have declared, he must lead us, if we may still maintain our hope for Troy's destruction—therefore, you must not intrust that work to me. Much better, send the son of Telamon. His eloquence will overcome the hero's rage, most fierce from his disease and anger: or else his invention of some wile will skilfully deliver him to us.—The Simois will first flow backward, Ida stand without its foliage, and Achaia promise aid to Troy itself; ere, lacking aid from me, the craft of stupid Ajax will avail. “Though, Philoctetes, you should be enraged against your friends, against the king and me; although you c
Achaia (Greece) (search for this): book 13, card 313
e was not alone well meant (that would have been enough) but it was wise. Because our prophets have declared, he must lead us, if we may still maintain our hope for Troy's destruction—therefore, you must not intrust that work to me. Much better, send the son of Telamon. His eloquence will overcome the hero's rage, most fierce from his disease and anger: or else his invention of some wile will skilfully deliver him to us.—The Simois will first flow backward, Ida stand without its foliage, and Achaia promise aid to Troy itself; ere, lacking aid from me, the craft of stupid Ajax will avail. “Though, Philoctetes, you should be enraged against your friends, against the king and me; although you curse and everlastingly devote my head to harm; although you wish, to ease your anguish, that I may be given into your power, that you may shed my blood; and though you wait your turn and chance at me; still I will undertake the quest and will try all my skill to bring you back with me. If my good fo<