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Argive (Greece) (search for this): book 13, card 623
as Atrides, he who conquered Troy had heard of this (for you should not suppose that we, too, did not suffer from your storms) he dragged my daughters there with savage force, from my loved bosom to his hostile camp, and ordered them to feed the Argive fleet, by their divinely given power of touch. “Whichever way they could, they made escape two hastened to Euboea, and two sought their brother's island, Andros. Quickly then an Argive squadron, following, threatened war, unless they were surrendArgive squadron, following, threatened war, unless they were surrendered. The brother's love gave way to fear. And there is reason why you should forgive a timid brother's fear: he had no warrior like Aeneas, none like Hector, by whose prowess you held Troy from its destruction through ten years of war. “Strong chains were brought to hold my daughters' arms. Both lifted suppliant hands, which still were free, to heaven and cried, ‘0, Father Bacchus! give us needed aid!’ And he who had before given them the power of touch, did give them aid— if giving freedom
be destroyed entirely with her walls. Aeneas, the heroic son of Venus, bore on his shoulders holy images and still another holy weight, his sire, a venerable burden. From all his wealth the pious hero chose this for his care together with his child, Ascanius. Then with a fleet of exiles he sails forth, he leaves Antandrus, leaves the wicked realm and shore of Thrace now dripping with the blood of Polydorus. With fair winds and tide he and his comrades reach Apollo's isle. Good Anius, king of Delos, vigilant for all his subjects' welfare, and as priest devoted to Apollo, took him there into his temple and his home, and showed the city, the famed shrines, and the two trees which once Latona, while in labor, held. They burned sweet incense, adding to it wine, and laid the flesh of cattle in the flames, an offering marked by custom for the god. Then in the palace and its kingly hall, reclining on luxurious couches, they drank flowing wine with Ceres' gifts of food. But old Anchises asked:
ve my daughters precious gifts exceeding all my wishes and belief: since, every thing my daughters touched assumed the forms of corn, of sparkling wine, or gray-green olive oil. Most surely, wonderful advantages. “Soon as Atrides, he who conquered Troy had heard of this (for you should not suppose that we, too, did not suffer from your storms) he dragged my daughters there with savage force, from my loved bosom to his hostile camp, and ordered them to feed the Argive fleet, by their divinely give squadron, following, threatened war, unless they were surrendered. The brother's love gave way to fear. And there is reason why you should forgive a timid brother's fear: he had no warrior like Aeneas, none like Hector, by whose prowess you held Troy from its destruction through ten years of war. “Strong chains were brought to hold my daughters' arms. Both lifted suppliant hands, which still were free, to heaven and cried, ‘0, Father Bacchus! give us needed aid!’ And he who had before given t
Latona (California, United States) (search for this): book 13, card 623
s hero chose this for his care together with his child, Ascanius. Then with a fleet of exiles he sails forth, he leaves Antandrus, leaves the wicked realm and shore of Thrace now dripping with the blood of Polydorus. With fair winds and tide he and his comrades reach Apollo's isle. Good Anius, king of Delos, vigilant for all his subjects' welfare, and as priest devoted to Apollo, took him there into his temple and his home, and showed the city, the famed shrines, and the two trees which once Latona, while in labor, held. They burned sweet incense, adding to it wine, and laid the flesh of cattle in the flames, an offering marked by custom for the god. Then in the palace and its kingly hall, reclining on luxurious couches, they drank flowing wine with Ceres' gifts of food. But old Anchises asked: “O chosen priest of Phoebus, can I be deceived? When first I saw these walls, did you not have a son, and twice two daughters? Is it possible I am mistaken?” Anius replied,— shaking his temples <
Thrace (Greece) (search for this): book 13, card 623
The Fates did not allow the hope of Troy to be destroyed entirely with her walls. Aeneas, the heroic son of Venus, bore on his shoulders holy images and still another holy weight, his sire, a venerable burden. From all his wealth the pious hero chose this for his care together with his child, Ascanius. Then with a fleet of exiles he sails forth, he leaves Antandrus, leaves the wicked realm and shore of Thrace now dripping with the blood of Polydorus. With fair winds and tide he and his comrades reach Apollo's isle. Good Anius, king of Delos, vigilant for all his subjects' welfare, and as priest devoted to Apollo, took him there into his temple and his home, and showed the city, the famed shrines, and the two trees which once Latona, while in labor, held. They burned sweet incense, adding to it wine, and laid the flesh of cattle in the flames, an offering marked by custom for the god. Then in the palace and its kingly hall, reclining on luxurious couches, they drank flowing wine wit
Euboea (Greece) (search for this): book 13, card 623
ing my daughters touched assumed the forms of corn, of sparkling wine, or gray-green olive oil. Most surely, wonderful advantages. “Soon as Atrides, he who conquered Troy had heard of this (for you should not suppose that we, too, did not suffer from your storms) he dragged my daughters there with savage force, from my loved bosom to his hostile camp, and ordered them to feed the Argive fleet, by their divinely given power of touch. “Whichever way they could, they made escape two hastened to Euboea, and two sought their brother's island, Andros. Quickly then an Argive squadron, following, threatened war, unless they were surrendered. The brother's love gave way to fear. And there is reason why you should forgive a timid brother's fear: he had no warrior like Aeneas, none like Hector, by whose prowess you held Troy from its destruction through ten years of war. “Strong chains were brought to hold my daughters' arms. Both lifted suppliant hands, which still were free, to heaven and cried<
each Apollo's isle. Good Anius, king of Delos, vigilant for all his subjects' welfare, and as priest devoted to Apollo, took him there into his temple and his home, and showed the city, the famed shrines, and the two trees which once Latona, while in labor, held. They burned sweet incense, adding to it wine, and laid the flesh of cattle in the flames, an offering marked by custom for the god. Then in the palace and its kingly hall, reclining on luxurious couches, they drank flowing wine with Ceres' gifts of food. But old Anchises asked: “O chosen priest of Phoebus, can I be deceived? When first I saw these walls, did you not have a son, and twice two daughters? Is it possible I am mistaken?” Anius replied,— shaking his temples wreathed with fillets white,— “It can be no mistake, great hero, you did see the father of five children then, (so much the risk of fortune may affect the best of men). You see me now, almost bereft of all. For what assistance can my absent son afford, while