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Olympus (Greece) (search for this): book 13, card 750
er, but even more to me, for he alone had won my love. Eight birthdays having passed a second time, his tender cheeks were marked with softest down. “While I pursued him with a constant love, the Cyclops followed me as constantly. And, should you ask me, I could not declare whether my hatred of him, or my love of Acis was the stronger.—They were equal. “O gentle Venus! what power equals yours! That savage, dreaded by the forest trees, feared by the stranger who beholds his face contemner of Olympus and the gods, now he can feel what love is. He is filled with passion for me. He burns hot for me, forgetful of his cattle and his caves. “Now, Polyphemus, wretched Cyclops, you are careful of appearance, and you try the art of pleasing. You have even combed your stiffened hair with rakes: it pleases you to trim your shaggy beard with sickles, while you gaze at your fierce features in a pool so earnest to compose them. Love of flesh, ferocity and your keen thirst for blood have ceased. The
ll out his palpitating entrails, and scatter his torn limbs about the fields and over and throughout your salty waves; and then let him unite himself to you.— I burn so, and my slighted passion raves with greater fury and I seem to hold and carry Aetna in my breast—transferred there with its flames—Oh Galatea! can you listen to my passion thus unmoved!’ “I saw all this; and, after he in vain had uttered such complaints, he stood up like a raging bull whose heifer has been lost, that cannot stanbrush and forests, that he knows so well: when that fierce monster saw me and my Acis— we neither knew nor guessed our fate—he roared: ‘I see you and you never will again parade your love before me!’ In such a voice as matched his giant size. All Aetna shook and trembled at the noise; and I amazed with horror, plunged into the adjoining sea. “My loved one, Acis turned his back and fled and cried out, ‘Help me Galatea, help! 0, let your parents help me, and admit me safe within th
Cyclops (Arizona, United States) (search for this): book 13, card 750
were marked with softest down. “While I pursued him with a constant love, the Cyclops followed me as constantly. And, should you ask me, I could not declare whether hot for me, forgetful of his cattle and his caves. “Now, Polyphemus, wretched Cyclops, you are careful of appearance, and you try the art of pleasing. You have evenson of Eurymus, who never could mistake an omen, met the dreadful fierce, huge Cyclops, Polyphemus, and he said, ‘That single eye now midmost in your brow Ulysses will take from you.’ In reply, the Cyclops only laughed at him and said, ‘Most silly of the prophets! you are wrong, a maiden has already taken it!’ So he made fun of I should be more patient under slights, if you avoided all men: why reject the Cyclops for the love that Acis gives? And why prefer his smiles to my embraces, but led admit me safe within their realm; for I am now near my destruction!’ But the Cyclops rushed at him and hurled a fragment, he had torn out from the mountain,
under slights, if you avoided all men: why reject the Cyclops for the love that Acis gives? And why prefer his smiles to my embraces, but let him please himself, andbrush and forests, that he knows so well: when that fierce monster saw me and my Acis— we neither knew nor guessed our fate—he roared: ‘I see you and you never will a noise; and I amazed with horror, plunged into the adjoining sea. “My loved one, Acis turned his back and fled and cried out, ‘Help me Galatea, help! 0, let your pareburied him entirely. “Then I did the only thing the Fates permitted me: I let my Acis take ancestral power of river deities. The purple blood flowed from beneath the s waist, his new horns circled with entwining reeds, and the youth certainly was Acis, though he was of larger stature and his face and features all were azure. Acis was of larger stature and his face and features all were azure. Acis changed into a stream which ever since that time has flowed there and retained its fo