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M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Art of Poetry: To the Pisos (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Tiber (Italy) or search for Tiber (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 27 document sections:

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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 131 (search)
This self-praise is quite consonant to the heroic age, Il. 4. 505, Od. 9. 19. Comp. also 1. 378, 9. Oracula, given by the Tiber, and by the Sibyl 6. 96. Sed is put as though Atridis quidem coniunctus es or something similar had preceded. Virg. was thinking of Lucr. 1. 140, Sed tua me virtus tamen et sperata voluptas &c.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 204 (search)
The Forum Boarium, in which the Ara Maxuma stood, is on the level ground close to the Tiber.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 473 (search)
Vires ad auxilium exiguae like serae ad fortia vires v. 509. Tusco amni the Tiber. Claudimur: comp. 10 377, claudit nos obiice pontus.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 538 (search)
For the latter half of this line and for the next comp. 1. 100 note Here Rom. and one of Ribbeck's cursives have unda, and one inferior copy undis. With the general auticipation comp. 6. 87. Heyne remarks that there is no battle at the Tiber like that at the Scamander: Virg. however has chosen to repeat the image 12. 35.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 549 (search)
Fertur aqua is explained by the next clause to mean are carried without any exertion of their own: elsewhere it merely means navigation of any sort. So fertur equis sometimes means riding generally (5. 574), sometimes being rum away with (1. 476). Missusque secundo defluit amni G. 3. 447, Segnis, without need of rowing, a contrast to their former journey, where, though Tiber made his stream smooth, remigio noctemque diemque fatigant, v. 94. The epithet is perhaps intended to hint a faint opposition between the praestantis virtute and their inferiors, though it is difficult to justify such an opposition: see on v. 547.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 778-818 (search)
Mnestheus and Serestus rally the Trojans, who press upon Turnus. At last he leaps into the Tiber, swims to shore, and rejoins his army.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 48 (search)
Sane concessive, as in Cic. Acad. Prior. 2. 32. 105 (Forc.) haec si vobis non probamus sint falsa sane: invidiosa certe non sunt. For sane Rom. and some others, including one of Ribbeck's cursives, have procul: sane has the authority of Serv., and seems less likely to have been interpolated. For in undis Pal. corrected, Gud., and some others have in eris, which might stand: comp. 1. 331, quibus orbis in oris Iactemur. But undis was the original reading of Pal., and is found as a variant in Gud., and it seems more likely that oris may have been introduced from 1. l. c., and perhaps G. 3. 225. She characteristically exaggerates Aeneas' journey up the Tiber into a hazardous voyage, the issue of which is as yet unknown.
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