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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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This description of Bacchic orgies and frenzy is altogether Greek, and suggested by some Greek work, such as the Bacchae of Euripides. The Bacchanalia were introduced into Rome from Southern Italy through Etruria, but their celebration leading to dreadful excesses, they were suppressed throughout Italy by a decree of the Senate B.C. 186. See Livy 39. 8 foll. Perhaps Virg.'s nefas may be a touch of Roman feeling. Comp. 4. 301 foll., where Dido is compared to a Bacchant. Med. a m. p. and one of Ribbeck's cursives originally have in silvis. Rom. and some others have nomine, which might stand; but numine is better. Serv. thinks simulato means delusion, not conscious pretence, appealing to v. 405 below: but Virg. doubtless means that the pretended enthusiasm eventually took real hold on her. Ov. M. 6. 594 (of Procne) is, as usual, more explicit, furiisque agitata doloris, Bacche, tuas simulat.
This description of Bacchic orgies and frenzy is altogether Greek, and suggested by some Greek work, such as the Bacchae of Euripides. The Bacchanalia were introduced into Rome from Southern Italy through Etruria, but their celebration leading to dreadful excesses, they were suppressed throughout Italy by a decree of the Senate B.C. 186. See Livy 39. 8 foll. Perhaps Virg.'s nefas may be a touch of Roman feeling. Comp. 4. 301 foll., where Dido is compared to a Bacchant. Med. a m. p. and one of Ribbeck's cursives originally have in silvis. Rom. and some others have nomine, which might stand; but numine is better. Serv. thinks simulato means delusion, not conscious pretence, appealing to v. 405 below: but Virg. doubtless means that the pretended enthusiasm eventually took real hold on her. Ov. M. 6. 594 (of Procne) is, as usual, more explicit, furiisque agitata doloris, Bacche, tuas simulat.
This description of Bacchic orgies and frenzy is altogether Greek, and suggested by some Greek work, such as the Bacchae of Euripides. The Bacchanalia were introduced into Rome from Southern Italy through Etruria, but their celebration leading to dreadful excesses, they were suppressed throughout Italy by a decree of the Senate B.C. 186. See Livy 39. 8 foll. Perhaps Virg.'s nefas may be a touch of Roman feeling. Comp. 4. 301 foll., where Dido is compared to a Bacchant. Med. a m. p. and one of Ribbeck's cursives originally have in silvis. Rom. and some others have nomine, which might stand; but numine is better. Serv. thinks simulato means delusion, not conscious pretence, appealing to v. 405 below: but Virg. doubtless means that the pretended enthusiasm eventually took real hold on her. Ov. M. 6. 594 (of Procne) is, as usual, more explicit, furiisque agitata doloris, Bacche, tuas simulat.