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y, and now ensnares in wars unknown? Look how we men that dared lay Ilium waste (I speak not of what woes in battling neath her lofty walls we bore, nor of dead warriors sunk in Simois' wave) have paid the penalty in many a land with chastisement accurst and changeful woe, till Priam's self might pity. Let the star of Pallas tell its tale of fatal storm, off grim Caphereus and Eubcea's crags. Driven asunder from one field of war, Atrides unto farthest Egypt strayed, and wise Ulysses saw from Aetna's caves the Cyclops gathering. Why name the throne of Pyrrhus, or the violated hearth whence fled Idomeneus? Or Locri cast on Libya's distant shore? For even he, Lord of Mycenae by the Greeks obeyed, fell murdered on his threshold by the hand of that polluted wife, whose paramour trapped Asia's conqueror. The envious gods withheld me also from returning home to see once more the hearth-stone of my sires, the wife I yearn for, and my Calydon, the beauteous land. For wonders horrible pursue me
Mycenae (Greece) (search for this): book 11, card 243
Simois' wave) have paid the penalty in many a land with chastisement accurst and changeful woe, till Priam's self might pity. Let the star of Pallas tell its tale of fatal storm, off grim Caphereus and Eubcea's crags. Driven asunder from one field of war, Atrides unto farthest Egypt strayed, and wise Ulysses saw from Aetna's caves the Cyclops gathering. Why name the throne of Pyrrhus, or the violated hearth whence fled Idomeneus? Or Locri cast on Libya's distant shore? For even he, Lord of Mycenae by the Greeks obeyed, fell murdered on his threshold by the hand of that polluted wife, whose paramour trapped Asia's conqueror. The envious gods withheld me also from returning home to see once more the hearth-stone of my sires, the wife I yearn for, and my Calydon, the beauteous land. For wonders horrible pursue me still. My vanished followers through upper air take wing, or haunt and rove in forms of birds the island waters o'er: ah me, what misery my people feel! The tall rocks ring wit
Greece (Greece) (search for this): book 11, card 243
ge me not, I pray, to conflicts in this wise. No more for me of war with Trojans after Ilium's fall! I take no joy in evils past, nor wish such memory to renew. Go, lay these gifts, brought to my honor from your ancient land, at great Aeneas' feet. We twain have stood confronting close with swords implacable in mortal fray. Believe me, I have known the stature of him when he lifts his shield, and swings the whirlwind of his spear. If Troy two more such sons had bred, the Dardan horde had stormed at Argos' gates, and Greece to-day were for her fallen fortunes grieving sore. Our lingering at Ilium's stubborn wall, our sluggard conquest halting ten years Iong, was his and Hector's work. Heroic pair! Each one for valor notable, and each famous in enterprise of arms,—but he was first in piety. Enclasp with his your hands in plighted peace as best ye may: but shock of steel on steel ye well may shun.’ now hast thou heard, good King, a king's reply, and how his wisdom sits in this vast wa
ght pity. Let the star of Pallas tell its tale of fatal storm, off grim Caphereus and Eubcea's crags. Driven asunder from one field of war, Atrides unto farthest Egypt strayed, and wise Ulysses saw from Aetna's caves the Cyclops gathering. Why name the throne of Pyrrhus, or the violated hearth whence fled Idomeneus? Or Locri cast on Libya's distant shore? For even he, Lord of Mycenae by the Greeks obeyed, fell murdered on his threshold by the hand of that polluted wife, whose paramour trapped Asia's conqueror. The envious gods withheld me also from returning home to see once more the hearth-stone of my sires, the wife I yearn for, and my Calydon, the beauteous land. For wonders horrible pursue me still. My vanished followers through upper air take wing, or haunt and rove in forms of birds the island waters o'er: ah me, what misery my people feel! The tall rocks ring with their lament and cry. Naught else had I to hope for from that day when my infatuate sword on gods I drew, and outrag
y walls we bore, nor of dead warriors sunk in Simois' wave) have paid the penalty in many a land with chastisement accurst and changeful woe, till Priam's self might pity. Let the star of Pallas tell its tale of fatal storm, off grim Caphereus and Eubcea's crags. Driven asunder from one field of war, Atrides unto farthest Egypt strayed, and wise Ulysses saw from Aetna's caves the Cyclops gathering. Why name the throne of Pyrrhus, or the violated hearth whence fled Idomeneus? Or Locri cast on Libya's distant shore? For even he, Lord of Mycenae by the Greeks obeyed, fell murdered on his threshold by the hand of that polluted wife, whose paramour trapped Asia's conqueror. The envious gods withheld me also from returning home to see once more the hearth-stone of my sires, the wife I yearn for, and my Calydon, the beauteous land. For wonders horrible pursue me still. My vanished followers through upper air take wing, or haunt and rove in forms of birds the island waters o'er: ah me, what m
at fortune blind tempts ye from peace away, and now ensnares in wars unknown? Look how we men that dared lay Ilium waste (I speak not of what woes in battling neath her lofty walls we bore, nor of dead warriors sunk in Simois' wave) have paid the penalty in many a land with chastisement accurst and changeful woe, till Priam's self might pity. Let the star of Pallas tell its tale of fatal storm, off grim Caphereus and Eubcea's crags. Driven asunder from one field of war, Atrides unto farthest Egypt strayed, and wise Ulysses saw from Aetna's caves the Cyclops gathering. Why name the throne of Pyrrhus, or the violated hearth whence fled Idomeneus? Or Locri cast on Libya's distant shore? For even he, Lord of Mycenae by the Greeks obeyed, fell murdered on his threshold by the hand of that polluted wife, whose paramour trapped Asia's conqueror. The envious gods withheld me also from returning home to see once more the hearth-stone of my sires, the wife I yearn for, and my Calydon, the beaut
braved all perils to our journey's end and clasped that hand whereof the dreadful stroke wrought Ilium's fall. The hero built a town, Argyripa, hereditary name, near mount Garganus in Apulian land: plind tempts ye from peace away, and now ensnares in wars unknown? Look how we men that dared lay Ilium waste (I speak not of what woes in battling neath her lofty walls we bore, nor of dead warriors Venus. Urge me not, I pray, to conflicts in this wise. No more for me of war with Trojans after Ilium's fall! I take no joy in evils past, nor wish such memory to renew. Go, lay these gifts, broughthave known the stature of him when he lifts his shield, and swings the whirlwind of his spear. If Troy two more such sons had bred, the Dardan horde had stormed at Argos' gates, and Greece to-day were for her fallen fortunes grieving sore. Our lingering at Ilium's stubborn wall, our sluggard conquest halting ten years Iong, was his and Hector's work. Heroic pair! Each one for valor notable, and e