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Browsing named entities in a specific section of P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams). Search the whole document.

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Sicily (Italy) (search for this): book 1, card 180
ct; haply Antheus there, storm-buffeted, might sail within his ken, with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners, or Capys or Caicus armor-clad, upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; but while he looks, three stags along the shore come straying by, and close behind them comes the whole herd, browsing through the lowland vale in one long line. Aeneas stopped and seized his bow and swift-winged arrows, which his friend, trusty Achates, close beside him bore. His first shafts brought to earth the lordly heads of the high-antlered chiefs; his next assailed the general herd, and drove them one and all in panic through the leafy wood, nor ceased the victory of his bow, till on the ground lay seven huge forms, one gift for every ship. Then back to shore he sped, and to his friends distributed the spoil, with that rare wine which good Acestes while in Sicily had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; and with these words their mournful mood consoled
Caicus (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, card 180
ood Achates smote a flinty stone, secured a flashing spark, heaped on light leaves, and with dry branches nursed the mounting flame. Then Ceres' gift from the corrupting sea they bring away; and wearied utterly ply Ceres' cunning on the rescued corn, and parch in flames, and mill 'twixt two smooth stones. Aeneas meanwhile climbed the cliffs, and searched the wide sea-prospect; haply Antheus there, storm-buffeted, might sail within his ken, with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners, or Capys or Caicus armor-clad, upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; but while he looks, three stags along the shore come straying by, and close behind them comes the whole herd, browsing through the lowland vale in one long line. Aeneas stopped and seized his bow and swift-winged arrows, which his friend, trusty Achates, close beside him bore. His first shafts brought to earth the lordly heads of the high-antlered chiefs; his next assailed the general herd, and drove them one and all in panic through the lea