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Browsing named entities in a specific section of P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams). Search the whole document.

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Mycenae (Greece) (search for this): book 2, card 145
er statue in our camp, when glittering flame flashed from the staring eyes; from all its limbs salt sweat ran forth; three times (O wondrous tale!) it gave a sudden skyward leap, and made prodigious trembling of her lance and shield. The prophet Calchas bade us straightway take swift flight across the sea; for fate had willed the Trojan citadel should never fall by Grecian arm, till once more they obtain new oracles at Argos, and restore that god the round ships hurried o'er the sea. Now in Mycenae, whither they are fled, new help of heaven they find, and forge anew the means of war. Back hither o'er the waves they suddenly will come. So Calchas gave the meaning of the god. Warned thus, they reared in place of Pallas, desecrated shrine yon image of the horse, to expiate the woeful sacrilege. Calchas ordained that they should build a thing of monstrous size of jointed beams, and rear it heavenward, so might it never pass your gates, nor come inside your walls, nor anywise restore unto
Greece (Greece) (search for this): book 2, card 145
me true! What means the monstrous fabric of this horse? Who made it? Why? What offering to Heaven, or engin'ry of conquest may it be?” He spake; and in reply, with skilful guile, Greek that he was! the other lifted up his hands, now freed and chainless, to the skies: “O ever-burning and inviolate fires, witness my word! O altars and sharp steel, whose curse I fled, O fillets of the gods, which bound a victim's helpless forehead, hear! 'T is lawful now to break the oath that gave my troth to Greece. To execrate her kings is now my solemn duty. Their whole plot I publish to the world. No fatherland and no allegiance binds me any more. O Troy, whom I have saved, I bid thee keep the pledge of safety by good Priam given, for my true tale shall my rich ransom be. The Greeks' one hope, since first they opened war, was Pallas, grace and power. But from the day when Diomed, bold scorner of the gods, and false Ulysses, author of all guile, rose up and violently bore away Palladium, her holy shr
recian arm, till once more they obtain new oracles at Argos, and restore that god the round ships hurried o'er the sea. Now in Mycenae, whither they are fled, new help of heaven they find, and forge anew the means of war. Back hither o'er the waves they suddenly will come. So Calchas gave the meaning of the god. Warned thus, they reared in place of Pallas, desecrated shrine yon image of the horse, to expiate the woeful sacrilege. Calchas ordained that they should build a thing of monstrous size of jointed beams, and rear it heavenward, so might it never pass your gates, nor come inside your walls, nor anywise restore unto the Trojans their lost help divine. For had your hands Minerva's gift profaned, a ruin horrible—O, may the gods bring it on Calchas rather!—would have come on Priam's throne and all the Phrygian power. But if your hands should lift the holy thing to your own citadel, then Asia's host would hurl aggression upon Pelops' land, and all that curse on our own nation fal