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te a certain bounded part; that fearless thou may'st view the friendly sea, and in Ausonia's haven at the last find thee a fixed abode. Than this no more the Sister Fates to Helenus unveil, and Juno, Saturn's daughter, grants no more. First, that Italia (which nigh at hand thou deemest, and wouldst fondly enter in by yonder neighboring bays) lies distant far o'er trackless course and long, with interval of far-extended lands. Thine oars must ply the waves of Sicily; thy fleet must cleave the larss Scylla in her vaulted cave, where grim rocks echo her dark sea-dogs' roar. Yea, more, if aught of prescience be bestowed on Helenus, if trusted prophet he, and Phoebus to his heart true voice have given, o goddess-born, one counsel chief of all I tell thee oft, and urge it o'er and o'er. To Juno's godhead lift thy Ioudest prayer; to Juno chant a fervent votive song, and with obedient offering persuade that potent Queen. So shalt thou, triumphing, to Italy be sped, and leave behind Trinacria.
Sicily (Italy) (search for this): book 3, card 374
s) lies distant far o'er trackless course and long, with interval of far-extended lands. Thine oars must ply the waves of Sicily; thy fleet must cleave the large expanse of that Ausonian brine; the waters of Avernus thou shalt see, and that enchantedlf be faithful; let thy seed forever thus th' immaculate rite maintain. After departing hence, thou shalt be blown toward Sicily, and strait Pelorus' bounds will open wide. Then take the leftward way: those leftward waters in long circuit sweep, far rand sole and continuous lay, the sea's vast power burst in between, and bade its waves divide Hesperia's bosom from fair Sicily, while with a straitened firth it interflowed their fields and cities sundered shore from shore. The right side Scylla ketell thee oft, and urge it o'er and o'er. To Juno's godhead lift thy Ioudest prayer; to Juno chant a fervent votive song, and with obedient offering persuade that potent Queen. So shalt thou, triumphing, to Italy be sped, and leave behind Trinacria.
cry a milk-white, monstrous sow, with teeming brood of thirty young, new littered, white like her, all clustering at her teats, as prone she lies. There is thy city's safe, predestined ground, and there thy labors' end. Vex not thy heart about those ‘tables bitten’, for kind fate thy path will show, and Phoebus bless thy prayer. But from these lands and yon Italian shore, where from this sea of ours the tide sweeps in, escape and flee, for all its cities hold pernicious Greeks, thy foes: the Locri there have builded walls; the wide Sallentine fields are filled with soldiers of Idomeneus; there Meliboean Philoctetes' town, petilia, towers above its little wall. Yea, even when thy fleet has crossed the main, and from new altars built along the shore thy vows to Heaven are paid, throw o'er thy head a purple mantle, veiling well thy brows, lest, while the sacrificial fire ascends in offering to the gods, thine eye behold some face of foe, and every omen fail. Let all thy people keep this