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ers, and ensheathed in stiffening ice glitters his great grim beard. Here first was stayed the speed of Mercury's well-poising wing; here making pause, from hence he headlong flung his body to the sea; in motion like some sea-bird's, which along the levelled shore or round tall crags where rove the swarming fish, flies Iow along the waves: o'er-hovering so between the earth and skies, Cyllene's god flew downward from his mother's mountain-sire, parted the winds and skimmed the sandy merge of Libya. When first his winged feet came nigh the clay-built Punic huts, he saw Aeneas building at a citadel, and founding walls and towers; at his side was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred, his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold, her gift of love; straightway the god began: “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall, build her proud city? Hast th
eneas building at a citadel, and founding walls and towers; at his side was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred, his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold, her gift of love; straightway the god began: “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall, build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? From bright Olympus, I. He who commands all gods, and by his sovran deity moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade me bear on winged winds his high decree. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? If the proud reward of thy destined way move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon Iulus in his bloom, thy hope and heir Ascanius. It is his rightful due in Italy o'er Roman lands to reign.” After such word Cyllene's winged god vani<
Carthage (Tunisia) (search for this): book 4, card 238
god flew downward from his mother's mountain-sire, parted the winds and skimmed the sandy merge of Libya. When first his winged feet came nigh the clay-built Punic huts, he saw Aeneas building at a citadel, and founding walls and towers; at his side was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred, his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold, her gift of love; straightway the god began: “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall, build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? From bright Olympus, I. He who commands all gods, and by his sovran deity moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade me bear on winged winds his high decree. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? If the proud reward of thy destined way move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil to thine ow
a blade with yellow jaspers starred, his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold, her gift of love; straightway the god began: “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall, build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? From bright Olympus, I. He who commands all gods, and by his sovran deity moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade me bear on winged winds his high decree. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? If the proud reward of thy destined way move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon Iulus in his bloom, thy hope and heir Ascanius. It is his rightful due in Italy o'er Roman lands to reign.” After such word Cyllene's winged god vanished, and e'er his accents died away, dissolved in air before the mortal's