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ich uppon the ryght syde have a flawe. By Romeche and by Cawlon, and by Narice thence he past, And from the streyghtes of Sicily gate quyght and cleere at last. Then ran he by th'Aeolian Iles and by the metall myne Of Tempsa, and by Lewcosye, and temprate Pest where fyne And pleasant Roses florish ay. From thence by Capreas And Atheney the headlond of Minerva he did passe To Surrent, where with gentle vynes the hilles bee overclad, And by the towne of Hercules and Stabye ill bestad And Naples borne to Idlenesse, and Cumes where Sybell had Hir temples, and the scalding bathes, and Linterne where growes store Of masticke trees, and Vulturne which beares sand apace from shore, And Sinuesse where as Adders are as whyght as any snowe, And Minturne of infected ayre bycause it stands so lowe, And Caiete where Aeneas did his nurce in tumbe bestowe, And Formy where Antiphates the Lestrigon did keepe, And Trache envyrond with a fen, and Circes mountayne steepe: To Ancon with the boysto
y through Th'Ionian sea with little gales of westerne wynd not rough, The sixt day morning came uppon the coast of Italy. And passing foorth by Junos Church that mustreth to the eye Uppon the head of Lacine he was caryed also by The rocke of Scylley. Then he left the land of Calabrye And rowing softly by the rocke Zephyrion, he did draw To Celen cliffs the which uppon the ryght syde have a flawe. By Romeche and by Cawlon, and by Narice thence he past, And from the streyghtes of Sicily gate quyght and cleere at last. Then ran he by th'Aeolian Iles and by the metall myne Of Tempsa, and by Lewcosye, and temprate Pest where fyne And pleasant Roses florish ay. From thence by Capreas And Atheney the headlond of Minerva he did passe To Surrent, where with gentle vynes the hilles bee overclad, And by the towne of Hercules and Stabye ill bestad And Naples borne to Idlenesse, and Cumes where Sybell had Hir temples, and the scalding bathes, and Linterne where growes store Of m
wynd did dryve the shippe. The God avauncing hye, And leaning with his necke uppon the Gallyes syde, did lye And looke uppon the greenish waves, and cutting easly through Th'Ionian sea with little gales of westerne wynd not rough, The sixt day morning came uppon the coast of Italy. And passing foorth by Junos Church that mustreth to the eye Uppon the head of Lacine he was caryed also by The rocke of Scylley. Then he left the land of Calabrye And rowing softly by the rocke Zephyrion, he did draw To Celen cliffs the which uppon the ryght syde have a flawe. By Romeche and by Cawlon, and by Narice thence he past, And from the streyghtes of Sicily gate quyght and cleere at last. Then ran he by th'Aeolian Iles and by the metall myne Of Tempsa, and by Lewcosye, and temprate Pest where fyne And pleasant Roses florish ay. From thence by Capreas And Atheney the headlond of Minerva he did passe To Surrent, where with gentle vynes the hilles bee overclad, And by the towne
And with his crackling scales did in the sand a furrowe cut, And taking hold uppon the sterne did in the Galy put His head, and rested till he came past Camp and Lavine sands, And entred Tybers mouth at which the Citie Ostia stands. The folke of Rome came hither all by heapes bothe men and wyves And eeke the Nunnes that keepe the fyre of Vesta as theyr lyves, To meete the God, and welcomd him with joyfull noyse. And as The Gally rowed up the streame, greate store of incence was On altars burnt on bothe the banks, so that on eyther syde The fuming of the frankincence the very aire did hyde, And also slaine in sacrifyse full many cattell dyde. Anon he came to Rome, the head of all the world: and there The serpent lifting up himself, began his head to beare Ryght up along the maast, uppon the toppe whereof on hye He looked round about, a meete abyding place to spye. The Tyber dooth devyde itself in twaine, and dooth embrace A little pretye Iland (so the people terme the place) From
is Godhed to the full, And for the heavye weyght of him did after passe more dull. The Romanes being glad of him, and having killd a steere Uppon the shore, untyde theyr ropes and cables from the peere. The lyghtsum wynd did dryve the shippe. The God avauncing hye, And leaning with his necke uppon the Gallyes syde, did lye And looke uppon the greenish waves, and cutting easly through Th'Ionian sea with little gales of westerne wynd not rough, The sixt day morning came uppon the coast of Italy. And passing foorth by Junos Church that mustreth to the eye Uppon the head of Lacine he was caryed also by The rocke of Scylley. Then he left the land of Calabrye And rowing softly by the rocke Zephyrion, he did draw To Celen cliffs the which uppon the ryght syde have a flawe. By Romeche and by Cawlon, and by Narice thence he past, And from the streyghtes of Sicily gate quyght and cleere at last. Then ran he by th'Aeolian Iles and by the metall myne Of Tempsa, and by Lewco