hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Troy (Turkey) 80 0 Browse Search
Sunne (Sweden) 74 0 Browse Search
Persey (Tennessee, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Phebus (Louisiana, United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 32 0 Browse Search
Lyons (France) 32 0 Browse Search
Bacchus (Tennessee, United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Thessaly (Greece) 28 0 Browse Search
Cadmus (Ohio, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Troy (Massachusetts, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding). Search the whole document.

Found 36 total hits in 5 results.

Pallas (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): book 2, card 531
st have bene and what thou seest me now: And what hath bene the ground hereof. I boldly dare avow, That thou shalt finde my faithfulnesse imputed for a crime. For Pallas in a wicker chest had hid upon a time A childe calde Ericthonius, whome never woman bare, And tooke it unto Maidens three that Cecrops daughters were, Nuld be of right To holde their tongues for being shent. But you will say perchaunce I came unsentfor of my selfe, she did me not advaunce. I dare well say though Pallas now my heavie Mistresse stand Yet if perhaps ye should demaund the question at hir hand, As sore displeased as she is, she would not this denie: But that she chos as erst remained not the print. Me thought I glided on the ground. Anon with sodaine dint, I rose and hovered in the Ayre. And from that instant time Did wait on Pallas faithfully without offence or crime. But what availes all this to me, and if that in my place The wicked wretch Nyctyminee (who late for lacke of grace Wa
Thessaly (Greece) (search for this): book 2, card 531
the Romaine Capitoll beset with foes about. His tongue was cause of all his harme, his tatling tongue did make His colour which before was white, become so foule and blake. Coronis of Larissa was the fairest maide of face, In all the land of Thessalie. Shee stoode in Phebus grace As long as that she kept hir chast, or at the least as long As that she scaped unespide in doing Phebus wrong. But at the last Apollos birde hir privie packing spide, Whome no entreatance could persuade buddes with wondring at hir girde. A mischiefe take thy tatling tongue, the Raven answerde tho. Thy vaine forspeaking moves me not. And so he forth did go And tels his Lorde Apollo how he saw Coronis lie Wyth Isthyis, a Gentleman that dwelt in Thessalie. When Phebus heard his lovers fault, he fiersly gan to frowne, And cast his garlond from his head, and threw his violl downe. His colour chaungde, his face lookt pale, and as the rage of yre That boyled in his belking breast had set his heart
Argus (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): book 2, card 531
The Gods did graunt hir hir request: and straight to heaven she flue, In handsome Chariot through the Ayre, which painted peacocks drue As well beset with blasing eyes late tane from Argus hed, As thou thou prating Raven white by nature being bred, Hadst on thy fethers justly late a coly colour spred. For this same birde in auncient time had fethers faire and whight As ever was the driven snow, or silver cleare and bright. He might have well comparde himself in beautie with the Doves That have no blemish, or the Swan that running water loves: Or with the Geese that afterward should with their gagling out Preserve the Romaine Capitoll beset with foes about. His tongue was cause of all his harme, his tatling tongue did make His colour which before was white, become so foule and blake. Coronis of Larissa was the fairest maide of face, In all the land of Thessalie. Shee stoode in Phebus grace As long as that she kept hir chast, or at the least as long As that she scaped unespide
Phebus (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): book 2, card 531
. Coronis of Larissa was the fairest maide of face, In all the land of Thessalie. Shee stoode in Phebus grace As long as that she kept hir chast, or at the least as long As that she scaped unespide in doing Phebus wrong. But at the last Apollos birde hir privie packing spide, Whome no entreatance could persuade but that he swiftly hide Him to his maister, to bewray the doings of his love his Lorde Apollo how he saw Coronis lie Wyth Isthyis, a Gentleman that dwelt in Thessalie. When Phebus heard his lovers fault, he fiersly gan to frowne, And cast his garlond from his head, and threich the bloud pursuing after fast Upon hir white and tender limmes a scarlet colour cast) Saide: Phebus, well, thou might have wreakt this trespasse on my head And yet forborne me till the time I haday. The bodie being voyde of soule became as colde as clay. Than all too late, alas too late gan Phebus to repent That of his lover he had tane so cruell punishment. He blames himselfe for giving
Lesbos (Greece) (search for this): book 2, card 531
ed more did reast. I ran, but of my feete as erst remained not the print. Me thought I glided on the ground. Anon with sodaine dint, I rose and hovered in the Ayre. And from that instant time Did wait on Pallas faithfully without offence or crime. But what availes all this to me, and if that in my place The wicked wretch Nyctyminee (who late for lacke of grace Was turned to an odious birde) to honor called bee? I pray thee didst thou never heare how false Nyctyminee (A thing all over Lesbos knowne) defilde hir fathers couch? The beast is now become a birde, whose lewdnesse doth so touch And pricke hir guiltie conscience that she dares not come in sight, Nor shewe hirselfe abrode a dayes, but fleeteth in the night For shame lest folke should see hir fault: and every other birde Doth in the Ayre and Ivie toddes with wondring at hir girde. A mischiefe take thy tatling tongue, the Raven answerde tho. Thy vaine forspeaking moves me not. And so he forth did go And tels his Lord