hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Troy (Turkey) 80 0 Browse Search
Sunne (Sweden) 74 0 Browse Search
Persey (Tennessee, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Phebus (Louisiana, United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Lyons (France) 32 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 32 0 Browse Search
Bacchus (Tennessee, United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Thessaly (Greece) 28 0 Browse Search
Cadmus (Ohio, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Troy (Massachusetts, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding). Search the whole document.

Found 12 total hits in 4 results.

Thrace (Greece) (search for this): book 6, card 587
It was the time that wives of Thrace were wont to celebrate The three yeare rites of Bacchus which were done a nighttimes late. A nighttimes soundeth Rhodope of tincling pannes and pots: A nighttimes giving up hir house abrode Queene Progne trots Disguisde like Bacchus other froes and armed to the proofe With all the frenticke furniture that serves for that behoofe. Hir head was covered with a vine. About hir loose was tuckt A Reddeeres skin, a lightsome Launce upon hir shoulder ruckt. In post gaddes terrible Progne through the woods, and at hir heeles A flocke of froes. And where the sting of sorrow which she feeles Enforceth hir to furiousnesse, she feynes it to proceede Of Bacchus motion. At the length she finding out in deede The outset Graunge howlde out, and cride, Now well, and open brake The gates, and streight hir sister thence by force of hand did take, And veyling hir in like attire of Bacchus, hid hir head With Ivie leaves, and home to Court hir sore amazed led. As s
Rhodope (Greece) (search for this): book 6, card 587
It was the time that wives of Thrace were wont to celebrate The three yeare rites of Bacchus which were done a nighttimes late. A nighttimes soundeth Rhodope of tincling pannes and pots: A nighttimes giving up hir house abrode Queene Progne trots Disguisde like Bacchus other froes and armed to the proofe With all the frenticke furniture that serves for that behoofe. Hir head was covered with a vine. About hir loose was tuckt A Reddeeres skin, a lightsome Launce upon hir shoulder ruckt. In post gaddes terrible Progne through the woods, and at hir heeles A flocke of froes. And where the sting of sorrow which she feeles Enforceth hir to furiousnesse, she feynes it to proceede Of Bacchus motion. At the length she finding out in deede The outset Graunge howlde out, and cride, Now well, and open brake The gates, and streight hir sister thence by force of hand did take, And veyling hir in like attire of Bacchus, hid hir head With Ivie leaves, and home to Court hir sore amazed led. As
Athens (Greece) (search for this): book 6, card 587
o bring him to his ende. The tother sister slit His throte. And while some life and soule was in his members yit, In gobbits they them rent: whereof were some in Pipkins boyld, And other some on hissing spits against the fire were broyld, And with the gellied bloud of him was all the chamber foyld. To this same banquet Progne bade hir husband knowing nought Nor nought mistrusting of the harme and lewdnesse she had wrought. And feyning a solemnitie according to the guise Of Athens, at the which there might be none in any wise Besides hir husband and hir selfe, she banisht from the same Hir householde folke and sojourners, and such as guestwise came. King Tereus sitting in the throne of his forefathers, fed And swallowed downe the selfesame flesh that of his bowels bred. And he (so blinded was his heart) Fetch Itys hither, sed. No lenger hir most cruell joy dissemble could the Queene. But of hir murther coveting the messenger to beene, She said: The thing thou askes
how pitie did compell hir heart to yeelde, She turned to hir sisters face from Itys, and behelde Now t'one, now tother earnestly and said: Why tattles he And she sittes dumbe bereft of tongue? as well why calles not she Me sister, as this boy doth call me mother? Seest thou not, Thou daughter of Pandion, what a husband thou hast got? Thou growest wholy out of kinde. To such a husband as Is Tereus, pitie is a sinne. No more delay there was. She dragged Itys after hir, as when it happes in Inde A Tyger gets a little Calfe that suckes upon a Hynde And drags him through the shadie woods. And when that they had found A place within the house far off and far above the ground, Then Progne strake him with a sword now plainly seeing whother He should, and holding up his handes, and crying mother, mother, And flying to hir necke: even where the brest and side doe bounde, And never turnde away hir face. Inough had bene that wound Alone to bring him to his ende. The tother sister slit His