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Rother (United Kingdom) (search for this): book 7, card 453
of sheepe did faintly bleate, and therewithall begonne Their fleeces for to fall away and leave the naked skin, And all their bodies with the rot attainted were within. The lustie Horse that erst was fierce in field renowne to win Against his kinde grew cowardly: and now forgetting quight The auncient honor which he preast so oft to get in fight, Stoode sighing sadly at the Racke as wayting for to yeelde His wearie life without renowne of combat in the fielde. The Boare to chafe, the Hinde to runne, the cruell Beare to fall Upon the herdes of Rother beastes had now no lust at all. A languishing was falne on all. In wayes, in woods, in plaines, The filthie carions lay, whose stinche, the Ayre it selfe distaines. (A wondrous thing to tell) not Dogges, not ravening Foules, nor yit Horecoted Wolves would once attempt to tast of them a bit. Looke, where they fell, there rotted they: and with their savor bred More harme, and further still abrode the foule infection spred.
Aegina (Greece) (search for this): book 7, card 453
of golde is gripple still, And is as blacke as any cole, both fethers, feete and bill. A Cadowe is the name of hir. But yet Olyarey, And Didymey, and Andrey eke, and Tene, and Gyarey, And Pepareth where Olive trees most plenteously doe grow, In no wise would agree their helpe on Minos to bestow. Then Minos turning lefthandwise did sayle to Oenope Where reignde that time King Aeacus. This Ile had called be Of old by name of Oenope: but Aeacus turnde the name And after of his mothers name Aegina callde the same. The common folke ran out by heapes desirous for to see A man of such renowne as Minos bruited was to bee. The Kings three sonnes Duke Telamon, Duke Peley, and the yong Duke Phocus went to meete with him. Old Aeacus also clung With age, came after leysurely, and asked him the cause Of his repaire. The ruler of the hundred Shires gan pause: And musing on the inward griefe that nipt him at the hart, Did shape him aunswere thus: O Prince vouchsafe to take my part In th
Achaia (Greece) (search for this): book 7, card 453
the right And Butes on the left, the sonnes of one that Pallas hight. When greeting first had past betweene these Nobles and the King, Then Cephal setting streight abroche the message he did bring, Desired aide: and shewde what leagues stoode then in force betweene His countrie and the Aeginites, and also what had beene Decreed betwixt their aunceters, concluding in the ende That under colour of this war which Minos did pretende To only Athens, he in deede the conquest did intende Of all Achaia. When he thus by helpe of learned skill His countrie message furthred had, King Aeacus leaning still His left hand on his scepter, saide: My Lordes, I would not have Your state of Athens seeme so straunge as succor here to crave. I pray commaund. For be ye sure that what this Ile can make Is yours. Yea all that ere I have shall hazard for your sake. I want no strength. I have such store of souldiers, that I may Both vex my foes and also keepe my Realme in quiet stay. And now I thinke
all the Iles that in those seas doe sit. Anon the Iles Astypaley and Anaphey both twaine The first constreynde for feare of war, the last in hope of gaine, Tooke part with him. Low Myconey did also with him hold So did the chalkie Cymoley, and Syphney which of olde Was verie riche with veynes of golde, and Scyros full of bolde And valiant men, and Seryphey the smooth or rather fell, And Parey which for Marblestone doth beare away the bell. And Sythney which a wicked wench callde Arne did betray For mony: who upon receit thereof without delay Was turned to a birde which yet of golde is gripple still, And is as blacke as any cole, both fethers, feete and bill. A Cadowe is the name of hir. But yet Olyarey, And Didymey, and Andrey eke, and Tene, and Gyarey, And Pepareth where Olive trees most plenteously doe grow, In no wise would agree their helpe on Minos to bestow. Then Minos turning lefthandwise did sayle to Oenope Where reignde that time King Aeacus. This Ile had ca
Athens (Greece) (search for this): book 7, card 453
eginas sonne replide: Thy suite is vaine: and of my Realme perforce must be denide. For unto Athens is no lande more sure than this alide: Such leagues betweene us are which shall infringde for meretish fleete be kend. When thitherward with puffed sayles and wind at will did tend A ship from Athens, which anon arriving at the strand Set Cephal with Ambassade from his Countrimen aland. Thunceters, concluding in the ende That under colour of this war which Minos did pretende To only Athens, he in deede the conquest did intende Of all Achaia. When he thus by helpe of learned skill His leaning still His left hand on his scepter, saide: My Lordes, I would not have Your state of Athens seeme so straunge as succor here to crave. I pray commaund. For be ye sure that what this Ile cahinke me blest of God that time doth serve to showe Without excuse the great good will that I to Athens owe. God holde it sir (quoth Cephalus) God make the number grow Of people in this towne of yours
Parey (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany) (search for this): book 7, card 453
ndship for to win. And thereupon with flying fleete where passage did permit He went to visit all the Iles that in those seas doe sit. Anon the Iles Astypaley and Anaphey both twaine The first constreynde for feare of war, the last in hope of gaine, Tooke part with him. Low Myconey did also with him hold So did the chalkie Cymoley, and Syphney which of olde Was verie riche with veynes of golde, and Scyros full of bolde And valiant men, and Seryphey the smooth or rather fell, And Parey which for Marblestone doth beare away the bell. And Sythney which a wicked wench callde Arne did betray For mony: who upon receit thereof without delay Was turned to a birde which yet of golde is gripple still, And is as blacke as any cole, both fethers, feete and bill. A Cadowe is the name of hir. But yet Olyarey, And Didymey, and Andrey eke, and Tene, and Gyarey, And Pepareth where Olive trees most plenteously doe grow, In no wise would agree their helpe on Minos to bestow. Then Minos tu