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Browsing named entities in a specific section of C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan). Search the whole document.

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About the same time, C. Curio sailed from Sicily into Africa, with two of the four legions which had been put under his command by Caesar, and five hundred horse; having conceived the highest contempt of the troops headed by P. Attius Varus. After two days and three nights sailing, he landed at a place called Aquilaria. This place is about twenty-two miles distant from Clupea, and has a very convenient harbour for ships in the summer time, sheltered on each side by a promontory. L. Caesar, the son, waited for him at Clupea, with ten galleys, which P. Attius had taken in the war against the pirates, and repaired at Utica, for the service of the present war. But terrified at the number of ships Curio brought with him, he stood in for the coast; w
About the same time, C. Curio sailed from Sicily into Africa, with two of the four legions which had been put under his command by Caesar, and five hundred horse; having conceived the highest contempt of the troops headed by P. Attius Varus. After two days and three nights sailing, he landed at a place called Aquilaria. This place is about twenty-two miles distant from Clupea, and has o Adrumetum. C. Confidius Longus commanded in that town, with one legion: and here also the rest of the fleet repaired after Caesar's flight. M. Rufus the questor pursuing them, with twelve galleys, which Curio had brought with him from Africa, to guard the transports; when he saw Caesar's own galley upon the strand, he towed her off, and returned with the fleet to Curio.
Utica (Tunisia) (search for this): book 2, chapter 23
er two days and three nights sailing, he landed at a place called Aquilaria. This place is about twenty-two miles distant from Clupea, and has a very convenient harbour for ships in the summer time, sheltered on each side by a promontory. L. Caesar, the son, waited for him at Clupea, with ten galleys, which P. Attius had taken in the war against the pirates, and repaired at Utica, for the service of the present war. But terrified at the number of ships Curio brought with him, he stood in for the coast; where, running his galley on shore, he left her, and went by land to Adrumetum. C. Confidius Longus commanded in that town, with one legion: and here also the rest of the fleet repaired after Caesar's flight. M. Rufus the questor pursuing them, with t