hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Julian (Pennsylvania, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Nero (Ohio, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Julian (North Carolina, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Vestal (New York, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Julian (West Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Arcadian (Michigan, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
Germans (Pennsylvania, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
Sibyl (Iowa, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
The Cave (Alabama, United States) 2 0 Browse Search
Old Camp (Nevada, United States) 2 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb). Search the whole document.

Found 3 total hits in 1 results.

Julian (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): book 15, chapter 20
he proconsuls who had governed Crete should receive the thanks of the province. Pætus Thrasea, turning the occasion to public advantage, after having stated his opinion that the accused ought to be expelled from Crete, further spoke as follows:— "It is found by experience, Senators, that admirable laws and right precedents among the good have their origin in the misdeeds of others. Thus the license of advocates resulted in the Cincian bill; the corrupt practices of candidates, in the Julian laws; the rapacity of magistrates, in the Calpurnian enactments. For, in point of time, guilt comes before punishment, and correction follows after delinquency. And therefore, to meet the new insolence of provincials, let us adopt a measure worthy of Roman good faith and resolution, whereby our allies may lose nothing of our protection, while public opinion may cease to say of us, that the estimate of a man's character is to be found anywhere rather than in the judgment of our citizen