hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Epidamnus (Albania) 36 0 Browse Search
Syracuse (Italy) 16 0 Browse Search
Tarentum (Italy) 14 0 Browse Search
Cygnus (California, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Sicily (Italy) 8 0 Browse Search
Syracuse (New York, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Troy (Massachusetts, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Jupiter (Alabama, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 6 0 Browse Search
Ulysses (Kansas, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). Search the whole document.

Found 36 total hits in 9 results.

Lipara (Italy) (search for this): act 2, scene 3
that the words "Pintia" and "Liparo" are ablative cases; but it is much more probable that they are nominatives. Gronovius thinks that one Phintias is alluded to, who, as we are told by Diodorus Siculus, assumed the government at Agrigentum after the death of Agathocles. He did not, however, reign at Syracuse. We do not learn from history that Hiero received the government from Liparo, but, on the contrary, that his virtuous character was the sole ground for his election to the sovereignty. Lipara was the name of one of the Aeolian islands (now called the Isles of Lipari), not far from the coast of Sicily. Some think that she means to call Agathocles by the additional names of Plintias (and not Pintia) from plinto\s, "pottery," as he had exercised the trade of a potter, and of "Liparo," from the Greek luphro/s, "savage," by reason of the cruelty of which he was guilty in the latter part of his life. This notion seems, however, to be more fanciful than well-founded., the third Liparo,
Lipari (Italy) (search for this): act 2, scene 3
re probable that they are nominatives. Gronovius thinks that one Phintias is alluded to, who, as we are told by Diodorus Siculus, assumed the government at Agrigentum after the death of Agathocles. He did not, however, reign at Syracuse. We do not learn from history that Hiero received the government from Liparo, but, on the contrary, that his virtuous character was the sole ground for his election to the sovereignty. Lipara was the name of one of the Aeolian islands (now called the Isles of Lipari), not far from the coast of Sicily. Some think that she means to call Agathocles by the additional names of Plintias (and not Pintia) from plinto\s, "pottery," as he had exercised the trade of a potter, and of "Liparo," from the Greek luphro/s, "savage," by reason of the cruelty of which he was guilty in the latter part of his life. This notion seems, however, to be more fanciful than well-founded., the third Liparo, who at his death left the kingdom to Hiero--which Hiero is now king? MENAEC
know you, Menaechmus, the son of your father Moschus, who are said to have been born in Sicily, at Syracuse, where King Agathocles reigned, and after him PintiaAfter him Pintia: She is supposed, by the Commentators, to be purposely represented here as quite mistaken in her historical facts, and as making nothing but a confused jumble of them. Some think that the words "Pintia" and "Liparo" are ablative cases; but it is much more probable that they are nominatives. Gronovius thinks that one Phintias is alluded to, who, as we are told by Diodorus Siculus, assumed the government at Agrigentum after the death of Agathocles. He did not, however, reign at Syracuse. We do not learn from history that Hiero received the government from Liparo, but, on the contrary, that his virtuous character was the sole ground for his election to the sovereignty. Lipara was the name of one of the Aeolian islands (now called the Isles of Lipari), not far from the coast of Sicily. Some think that she means to
Syracuse (Italy) (search for this): act 2, scene 3
of me, and step this way with me. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES for, madam, you are looking for some other person, I know not whom, not me. EROTIUM Don't I know you, Menaechmus, the son of your father Moschus, who are said to have been born in Sicily, at Syracuse, where King Agathocles reigned, and after him PintiaAfter him Pintia: She is supposed, by the Commentators, to be purposely represented here as quite mistaken in her historical facts, and as making nothing but a confused jumble of them. Some th but it is much more probable that they are nominatives. Gronovius thinks that one Phintias is alluded to, who, as we are told by Diodorus Siculus, assumed the government at Agrigentum after the death of Agathocles. He did not, however, reign at Syracuse. We do not learn from history that Hiero received the government from Liparo, but, on the contrary, that his virtuous character was the sole ground for his election to the sovereignty. Lipara was the name of one of the Aeolian islands (now calle
Sicily (Italy) (search for this): act 2, scene 3
making fun of me, and step this way with me. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES for, madam, you are looking for some other person, I know not whom, not me. EROTIUM Don't I know you, Menaechmus, the son of your father Moschus, who are said to have been born in Sicily, at Syracuse, where King Agathocles reigned, and after him PintiaAfter him Pintia: She is supposed, by the Commentators, to be purposely represented here as quite mistaken in her historical facts, and as making nothing but a confused jumble of td the government from Liparo, but, on the contrary, that his virtuous character was the sole ground for his election to the sovereignty. Lipara was the name of one of the Aeolian islands (now called the Isles of Lipari), not far from the coast of Sicily. Some think that she means to call Agathocles by the additional names of Plintias (and not Pintia) from plinto\s, "pottery," as he had exercised the trade of a potter, and of "Liparo," from the Greek luphro/s, "savage," by reason of the cruelty o
Epidamnus (Albania) (search for this): act 2, scene 3
MESSENIO Didn't I say that these things are in the habit of occurring here? The leaves are falling now; in comparison with this, if we shall be here for three days, the trees will be tumbling upon you. For to such a degree are all these Courtesans wheedlers out of one's money. But only let me address her. Harkye, woman, I'm speaking to you. EROTIUM What's the matter? MESSENIO Where have you yourself known this person? EROTIUM In that same place where he has known me for this long time, in Epidamnus. MESSENIO In Epidamnus? A man who, until this day, has never put a foot here inside of this city. EROTIUM Heyday! You are making fun, my dear Menaechmus. But, prithee, why not go in? There, it will be more suitable for you. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES I' faith, this woman really does address me rightly by my name. I wonder very much what's the meaning of this business. MESSENIO aside. That purse that you are carrying has been smelt out by her. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES aside. I' faith, and rightly have
Agrigentum (Italy) (search for this): act 2, scene 3
ly, at Syracuse, where King Agathocles reigned, and after him PintiaAfter him Pintia: She is supposed, by the Commentators, to be purposely represented here as quite mistaken in her historical facts, and as making nothing but a confused jumble of them. Some think that the words "Pintia" and "Liparo" are ablative cases; but it is much more probable that they are nominatives. Gronovius thinks that one Phintias is alluded to, who, as we are told by Diodorus Siculus, assumed the government at Agrigentum after the death of Agathocles. He did not, however, reign at Syracuse. We do not learn from history that Hiero received the government from Liparo, but, on the contrary, that his virtuous character was the sole ground for his election to the sovereignty. Lipara was the name of one of the Aeolian islands (now called the Isles of Lipari), not far from the coast of Sicily. Some think that she means to call Agathocles by the additional names of Plintias (and not Pintia) from plinto\s, "pottery
Jupiter (Canada) (search for this): act 2, scene 3
to call Agathocles by the additional names of Plintias (and not Pintia) from plinto\s, "pottery," as he had exercised the trade of a potter, and of "Liparo," from the Greek luphro/s, "savage," by reason of the cruelty of which he was guilty in the latter part of his life. This notion seems, however, to be more fanciful than well-founded., the third Liparo, who at his death left the kingdom to Hiero--which Hiero is now king? MENAECHMUS SOSICLES You say, madam, what is not untrue. MESSENIO By Jupiter, hasn't this woman come from there, who knows you so readily? MENAECHMUS SOSICLES apart. Troth, I think she must not be denied. MESSENIO apart. Don't you do it. You are undone, if you enter inside her threshold. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES apart. But you only hold your tongue The matter goes on well. I shall assent to the woman, whatever she shall say, if I can get some entertainment. Just now, madam speaking to her in a low voice, I contradicted you not undesignedly; I was afraid of that fellow
Phrygia (Turkey) (search for this): act 2, scene 3
t all reluctantly. But do you know what I beg you to do? MENAECHMUS SOSICLES Only command me what you will. EROTIUM For you to take that mantle which you gave me just now to the embroiderer'sTo the embroiderer's: "Phrygionem." As the natives of Phrygia were very dexterous at embroidering, and their services were much sought for the purposes of luxury, all embroiderers, in time came to be called "phrygiones." Cotter renders "ad phrygionem" here "to Phrygia," and so throughout the whole play!, Phrygia," and so throughout the whole play!, that it may be trimmed again, and that some work may be added which I want. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES I' faith, you say what's right; in such a way shall it be disguised that my wife shan't know that you are wearing it, if she should see you in the street. EROTIUM Then take it away with you just now, when you go away. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES By all means. EROTIUM Let's go in-doors. Goes into her house. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES I'll follow you this instant; I only wish to speak to this person. So, there! Mess