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Browsing named entities in P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Andria: The Fair Andrian (ed. Henry Thomas Riley).

Found 73 total hits in 18 results.

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Attica (Greece) (search for this): act 5, scene 2
ll let you now hear from me a disgraceful piece of business. An old man, I don't know who he is, has just now come here; look you, he is a confident and shrewd person; when you look at his appearance, he seems to be a person of some consequence. There is a grave sternness in his features, and something commanding in his words. SIMO What news are you bringing, I wonder? DAVUS Why nothing but what I heard him mention. SIMO What does he say then? DAVUS That he knows Glycerium to be a citizen of Attica. SIMO going to his door. Ho there! Dromo, Dromo! Enter DROMO hastily from the house. DROMO What is it? SIMO Dromo! DAVUS Hear me. SIMO If you add a word----Dromo! DAVUS Hear me, pray. DROMO to SIMO. What do you want? SIMO pointing to DAVUS. Carry him off on your shoulders in-doors as fast as possible. DROMO Whom? SIMO Davus. DAVUS For what reason? SIMO Because I choose. To. DROMO. Carry him off, I say. DAVUS What have I done? SIMO Carry him off. DAVUS If you find that I have told a lie in a
Athens (Greece) (search for this): act 4, scene 5
ith, if I had known that, I never would have moved a foot hither. She was always said to be, and was looked upon as her sister; what things were hers she is in possession of; now for me to begin a suit at law here, the precedents of others warn me, a stranger, Warn me, a stranger: Patrick has the following remarks upon this passage: "Madame Dacier observes that it appears, from Xenophon's Treatise on the policy of the Athenians, that all the inhabitants of cities and islands in alliance with Athens were obliged in all claims to repair thither, and refer their cause to the decision of the people, not being permitted to plead elsewhere. We can not wonder then that Crito is unwilling to engage in a suit so inconvenient from its length, expense, and little prospect of success." She might have added that such was the partiality and corruptness of the Athenian people, that, being a stranger, his chances of success would probably be materially diminished. how easy and profitable a task it wou
Athens (Greece) (search for this): act 4, scene 4
an, you are not sober. DAVUS aloud. One scheme brings on another. I now hear it whispered about that she is a citizen of Attica---- CHREMES apart. Ha! DAVUS aloud. And that, constrained by the laws, Constrained by the laws: He alludes to a law at Athens which compelled a man who had debauched a free-born woman to marry her. This is said by Davus with the view of frightening Chremes from the match. he will have to take her as his wife. MYSIS Well now, pray, is she not a citizen? CHREMES apart. I you hear it? Here's villainy for you! she pointing at MYSIS ought to be carried off She ought to be carried off: He says this implying that Mysis, who is a slave, ought to be put to the torture to confess the truth; as it was the usual method at Athens to force a confession from slaves by that method. We find in the Hecyra, Bacchis readily offering her slaves to be put to the torture, and in the Adelphi the same custom is alluded to in the Scene between Micio, Hegio and Geta. hence to the tortu
Attica (Greece) (search for this): act 4, scene 4
, if he sees the child laid before the door, will not give his daughter; i'faith, he'll give her all the sooner. CHREMES apart. I'faith, he'll not do so. DAVUS aloud. Now therefore, that you may be quite aware, if you don't take up the child, I'll roll it forthwith into the middle of the road; and yourself in the same place I'll roll over into the mud. MYSIS Upon my word, man, you are not sober. DAVUS aloud. One scheme brings on another. I now hear it whispered about that she is a citizen of Attica---- CHREMES apart. Ha! DAVUS aloud. And that, constrained by the laws, Constrained by the laws: He alludes to a law at Athens which compelled a man who had debauched a free-born woman to marry her. This is said by Davus with the view of frightening Chremes from the match. he will have to take her as his wife. MYSIS Well now, pray, is she not a citizen? CHREMES apart. I had almost fallen unawares into a comical misfortune. Comes forward. DAVUS Who's that, speaking? Pretending to look about. O
Athens (Greece) (search for this): act 4, scene 3
Deities, or to the boughs and leaves of any tree gathered from a pure or sacred place. Fresh "verbenae" were placed upon the altars every day. See the Mercator of Plautus, 1. 672. from the altar here, From the altar here: It was usual to have altars on the stage; when Comedy was performed, one on the left hand in honor of Apollo, and on the representation of Tragedy, one on the right in honor of Bacchus. It has been suggested that Terence here alludes to the former of these. As, however, at Athens almost every house had its own altar in honor of Apollo Prostaterius just outside of the street door, it is most probable that to one of these altars reference is here made. They are frequently alluded to in the Plays of Plautus. and strew them under it. MYSIS Why don't you do it yourself? DAVUS That if perchance I should have to swear to my master that I did not place it there, I may be enabled to do so with a clear conscience. MYSIS I understand; have these new scruples only just now occur
Athens (Greece) (search for this): act 2, scene 2
t going to give you his daughter at present. PAMPHILUS How do you know ? DAVUS You shall know. Your father just now laid hold of me; he said that a wife was to be given you to-day, and many other things as well, which just now I haven't time to relate. Hastening to you immediately, I ran on to the Forum that I might tell you these things. When I didn't find you, I ascended there to a high place.To a high place: He probably alludes to some part of the Acropolis, the citadel, or higher part of Athens, which commanded a view of the lower town. I looked around; you were nowhere. There by chance I saw Byrrhia, his servant pointing to CHARINUS. I inquired of him; he said he hadn't seen you. This puzzled me. I considered what I was to do. As I was returning in the mean time, a surmise from the circumstances themselves occurred to me: " How now,--a very small amount of good cheer; lie out of spirits; a marriage all of a sudden; these things don't agree." PAMPHILUS But to what purpose this ? DA
Attica (Greece) (search for this): act 1, scene 3
g the Greeks of laying new-born children on the ground, upon which the father, or other person who undertook the care of the child, lifted it from the ground, " tollebat." In case no one took charge of the child, it was exposed, which was very frequently done in the case of female children. Plato was the first to inveigh against this barbarous practice. It is frequently alluded to in the Plays of Plautus. and they are now contriving among themselves a certain scheme, that she is a citizen of Attica. There was formerly a certain old man of this place, a merchant; he was shipwrecked off the Isle of Andros; he died. They say that there, the father of Chrysis, on that occasion, sheltered this girl, thrown on shore, an orphan, a little child. What nonsense! To myself at least it isn't very probable; the fiction pleases them, however. But Mysis is coming out of the house. Now I'll betake myself hence to the Forum,Hence to the Forum: Colman has the following remark: "The Forum is frequently s
Delphi (Greece) (search for this): act 1, scene 1
e, and indeed not very respectful to the "philosophers," in coupling them as objects of attraction with horses and hounds. in not one of these did he engage in particular beyond the rest, and yet in all of them in a moderate degree. I was pleased. SOSIA Not without reason; for this I deem in life to be especially advantageous; that one do nothing to excess.Nothing to excess: "Ne quid nimis." This was one of the three sentences which were inscribed in golden letters in the Temple of Apollo at Delphi. The two others were "Know thyself," and "Misery is the consequence of debt and discord." Sosia seems from the short glimpse we have of him to have been a retailer of old saws and proverbs. He is unfortunately only a Protatic or introductory character, as we lose sight of him after this Act. SIMO Such was his mode of life; readily to bear and to comply with all; with whomsoever he was in company, to them to resign himself; to devote himself to their pursuits; at variance with no one; never p
Cyclades (Greece) (search for this): act prologue, scene 0
udes to Luscus Lanuvinus, or Lavinius, a Comic Poet of his time, but considerably his senior. He is mentioned by Terence in all his Prologues except that to the Hecyra, and seems to have made it the business of his life to run down his productions and discover faults in them. Now I beseech you, give your attention to the thing which they impute as a fault. Menander composed the AndrianComposed the Andrian: This Play, like that of our author, took its name from the Isle of Andros, one of the Cyclades in the Aegean Sea, where Glycerium is supposed to have been born. Donatus, the Commentator on Terence, informs us that the first Scene of this Play is almost a literal translation from the Perinthian of Menander, in which the old man was represented as discoursing with his wife just as Simo does here with Sosia. In the Andrian of Menander, the old man opened with a soliloquy. and the Perinthian.And the Perinthian: This Play was so called from Perinthus, a town of Thrace, its heroine being a
Andros, one of the Cyclades in the Aegean Sea, where Glycerium is supposed to have been born. Donatus, the Commentator on Terence, informs us that the first Scene of this Play is almost a literal translation from the Perinthian of Menander, in which the old man was represented as discoursing with his wife just as Simo does here with Sosia. In the Andrian of Menander, the old man opened with a soliloquy. and the Perinthian.And the Perinthian: This Play was so called from Perinthus, a town of Thrace, its heroine being a native of that place. He who knows either of them well, will know them both; they are in plot not very different, and yet they have been composed in different language and style. What suited, he confesses he has transferred into the Andrian from the Perinthian, and has employed them as his own. These parties censure this proceeding; and on this point they differ from him, that Plays ought not to be mixed up together. By being thus knowing, do they not show that they know
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