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Browsing named entities in Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.). You can also browse the collection for Esop (Ohio, United States) or search for Esop (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 3, Esop and the Insolent Fellow (search)
Esop and the Insolent Fellow Fools from success perdition meet. An idle wretch about the street At Esop threw a stone in rage. " So much the better," quoth the sage, And gives three farthings for the job; " I've no more money in my fob; But if you 'll follow my advice, More shall be levied in a trice." It happen'd that the selfsame hour Came by a man of wealth and pow'r. " There, throw your pellet at my lord, And you shall have a sure reward!" The fellow did as he was told; But mark the downfastreet At Esop threw a stone in rage. " So much the better," quoth the sage, And gives three farthings for the job; " I've no more money in my fob; But if you 'll follow my advice, More shall be levied in a trice." It happen'd that the selfsame hour Came by a man of wealth and pow'r. " There, throw your pellet at my lord, And you shall have a sure reward!" The fellow did as he was told; But mark the downfall of the bold; His hopes are baulk'd, and, lo! he gains A rope and gibbet for his pains.'
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 3, Esop Playing (search)
Esop Playing As Esop was with boys at play, And had his nuts as well as they, A grave Athenian, passing by, Cast on the sage a scornful eye, As on a dotard quite bereaved: Which, when the moralist perceived, (Rather himself a wit profess'd Than the poor subject of a jest) Into the public way he flung A bow that he had just unstrung: There solve, thou conjurer," he cries, "The problem, that before thee lies." The people throng; he racks his brain, Nor can the thing enjoin'd explain. At last he gives it up-the seer Thus then in triumph made it clear: " As the tough bow exerts its spring, A constant tension breaks the string; But if 'tis let at seasons loose, You may depend upon its use." Thus recreative sports and play Are good upon a holiday, And with more spirit they'll pursue The studies which they shall renew.
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 3, Esop and the Importunate Fellow (search)
Esop and the Importunate Fellow Esop (no other slave at hand) Received himself his lord's command An early supper to provide. From house to house he therefore tried To beg the favor of a light; At length he hit upon the right. But as when first he Esop (no other slave at hand) Received himself his lord's command An early supper to provide. From house to house he therefore tried To beg the favor of a light; At length he hit upon the right. But as when first he sallied out He made his tour quite round about, On his return he took a race Directly, cross the market-place: When thus a talkative buffoon, " Esop, what means this light at noon ?' He answer'd briefly, as he ran, "Fellow, I'm looking for a man." Noive buffoon, " Esop, what means this light at noon ?' He answer'd briefly, as he ran, "Fellow, I'm looking for a man." Now if this jackanapes had weighed The true intent of what was said, He'd found that Esop had no sense Of manhood in impertinence. ive buffoon, " Esop, what means this light at noon ?' He answer'd briefly, as he ran, "Fellow, I'm looking for a man." Now if this jackanapes had weighed The true intent of what was said, He'd found that Esop had no sense Of manhood in impertinence.
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 4, Esop and the Will (search)
Esop and the Will That one man sometimes is more shrewd Than a stupendous multitude, To after-times I shall rehearse In my concise familiar verse. A certain man on his decease, Left his three girls so much a-piece: The first was beautiful and frail, With eyes still hunting for the male; The second giv'n to spin and card, A country housewife working hard; The third but very ill to pass, A homely slut, that loved her glas. The dying man had left his wife Executrix, and for her life Sole tenant, e cellar stored with good old wine, A handsome house to see a friend, With pleasant gardens at the end. Thus as she strove th' affair to close, By giving each the things they chose, And those that knew them every one Highly applauded what was done Esop arose, and thus address'd The crowd that to his presence pressed: "O that the dead could yet perceive! How would the prudent father grieve, That all th' Athenians had not skill Enough to understand his will! Then at their joint request he solved T
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 4, Phaedrus To the Cavillers (search)
Phaedrus To the Cavillers Thou that against my tales inveigh'st, As much too pleasant for thy taste; Egregious critic, cease to scoff While for a time I play you off, And strive to soothe your puny rage. As Esop comes upon the stage, And dress'd entirely new in Rome, Thus enters with the tragic plume.- " O that the fair Thessalian pine Had never felt the wrath divine, And fearless of the axe's wound, Had still the Pelian mountain crown'd! That Argus by Palladian aid Had ne'er the adventurous vessel made; In which at first, without dismay, Death's bold professors won their way, In which th' inhospitable main Was first laid open for the bane Of Grecians and barbarians too. Which made the proud AEetas rue, And whence Medea's crimes to nought The house and reign of Pelias brought. She-while in various forms she tries Her furious spirit to disguise, At one place in her flight bestow'd Her brother's limbs upon the road; And at another could betray The daughters their own sire to slay. How
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 4, The Pilot and Sailors (search)
The Pilot and Sailors On hearing a poor man lament His worldly thoughts in discontent, Esop this tale began to write, For consolation and delight. The ship by furious tempests tossed, The Mariners gave all for lost; But midst their tears and dread, the scene Is changed at once, and all serene. The wind is fair, the vessel speeds, The Sailors' boisterous joy exceeds: The Pilot then, by peril wise, Was prompted to philosophise. "'Tis right to put a due restraint On joy, and to retard complaint, Because alternate hope and fright Make up our lives of black and white."
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 4, Phaedrus, On His Fables. (search)
Phaedrus, On His Fables. What certain envious hearts intend I very clearly comprehend, Let them dissemble e'er so much.-. When they perceive the master's touch, And find 'tis likely to endure, They'll say 'tis Esop to be sure- But what appears of mean design, At any rate they'll vouch for mine. These in a word I would refute: Whether of great or no repute, What sprung from Esop's fertile thought This hand has to perfection brought; But waiving things to our distaste, Let's to the destined perio, On His Fables. What certain envious hearts intend I very clearly comprehend, Let them dissemble e'er so much.-. When they perceive the master's touch, And find 'tis likely to endure, They'll say 'tis Esop to be sure- But what appears of mean design, At any rate they'll vouch for mine. These in a word I would refute: Whether of great or no repute, What sprung from Esop's fertile thought This hand has to perfection brought; But waiving things to our distaste, Let's to the destined period haste.
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 5, Prologue, To Particulo (search)
Prologue, To Particulo WHEN I resolved my hand to stay For this, that others might have play, On reconsidering of my part I soon recanted in my heart: For if a rival should arise, How can he possibly devise The things that I have let alone, Since each man's fancy is his own, And likewise colouring of the piece ?"- It was not therefore mere caprice, But strong reflection made me write: Wherefore since you in tales delight, Which I, in justice, after all, Not Esop's, but Esopian call; Since he invented but a few; I more, and some entirely new, Keeping indeed the ancient style, With fresh materials all the while. As at your leisure you peruse The fourth collection of my muse, That you may not be at a stand, A fifth shall shortly come to hand; 'Gainst which, if as against the rest, Malignant cavillers protest, Let them carp on, and make it plain They carp at what they can't attain. My fame's secure, since I can show How men of eminence like you My little book transcribe and quote, As like
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.), book 5, Demetrius and Menander (search)
Demetrius and Menander If Esop's name at any time I bring into this measured rhyme, To whom I've paid whate'er I owe, Let all men by these presents know. I with th' old fabulist make free, To strengthen my authority. As certain sculptors of the age, The more attention to engage, And raise their price, the curious please, By forging of Praxiteles; And in like manner they purloin A Myro to their silver coin. 'Tis thus our fables we can smoke, As pictures for their age bespoke: For biting envy, in disgust To new improvements, favors rust; But now a tale comes in of course, Which these assertions will enforce. Demetrius, who was justly call'd The tyrant, got himself install'd, And held o'er Athens impious sway. The crowd, as ever is the way, Came, eager rushing far and wide, And, "Fortunate event!" they cried. The nobles came, the throne address'd' The hand by which they were oppress'd They meekly kiss'd, with inward stings Of anguish for the face of things. The idlers also, with the tri
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