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Carthage (Tunisia) (search for this): chapter 18
That is, of the Persians and Getulians united. the power rapidly increased; and at length, the children, through excess of population, separating from the parents, they took possession, under the name of Numidians, of those regions bordering on Carthage which are now called Numidia. In process of time, the two parties,The two parties] Utrique. The older Numidians, and the younger, who had emigrated toward Carthage. each assisting the other, reduced the neighboring tribes, by force or fear, undeCarthage. each assisting the other, reduced the neighboring tribes, by force or fear, under their sway; but those who had spread toward our sea, made the greater conquests: for the Lybians are less warlike than the Getulians.Those who had spread toward our sea--for the Libyans are less warlike than the Getulians] Magis hi, qui ad nostrum mare processerant ; quia Libyes quám Gœtuli minùs bellicosi. The Persians and Getulians (under the name of Numidians), and their colonists, who were more toward the Mediterranean, and were more warlike than the Libyans (who were united with the Medes
for the Lybians are less warlike than the Getulians.Those who had spread toward our sea--for the Libyans are less warlike than the Getulians] Magis hi, qui ad nostrum mare processerant ; quia Libyes quám Gœtuli minùs bellicosi. The Persians and Getulians (under the name of Numidians), and their colonists, who were more toward the Mediterranean, and were more warlike than the Libyans (who were united with the Medes and Armenians) took from them portions of their territories by conquest. This is clearly the sense, as deducible from the preceding portion of the text. At last nearly all lower Africa/un>Lower Africa] Africa pars inferior. The part nearest to the sea. The ancients called the maritime parts of a country the lower parts, and the inland parts the higher, taking the notion, probably, from the course of the rivers. Lower Egypt was the part at the mouth of the Nile. was occupied by the Numidians; and all the conquered tribes were merged in the nation and name of their conquero
Mauretania (search for this): chapter 18
Africa, then, was originally occupied by the Getulians and Libyans,XVIII. Getulians and Libyans] Gœtuli et Libyes. "See Pompon. Mel. i. 4; Plin. H. N. v. 4, 6, 8, v. 2, xxi. 13; Herod. iv. 159, 168."Gerlach The name Gœtuli, is, however, unknown to Herodotus. They lay to the south of Numidia and Mauretania. See Strabo, xvii. 3. Libyes is a term applied by the Greek writers properly to the Africans of the North coast, but frequently to the inhabitants of Africa in general. rude and uncivilized tribes, who subsisted on the flesh of wild animals, or, like cattle, on the herbage of the soil. They were controlled neither by customs, laws, nor the authority of any ruler; they wandered about, without fixed habitations, and slept in the abodes to which night drove them. But after Hercules, as the Africans think, perished in Spain, his army, which was composed of various nations,His army, which was composed of various nations] This seems to have been an amplification of the adventure of Hercul
Africa, then, was originally occupied by the Getulians and Libyans,XVIII. Getulians and Libyans] Gœtuli et Libyes. "See Pompon. Mel. i. 4; Plin. H. N. v. 4, 6, 8, v. 2, xxi. 13; Herod. iv. 159, 168. Greek writers properly to the Africans of the North coast, but frequently to the inhabitants of Africa in general. rude and uncivilized tribes, who subsisted on the flesh of wild animals, or, like ca from certain companions of Hercules. The point is not worth discussion. having sailed over into Africa, occupied the parts nearest to our sea.Our sea] The Mediterranean. See above, c. 17. The Persiaclearly the sense, as deducible from the preceding portion of the text. At last nearly all lower Africa/un>Lower Africa] Africa pars inferior. The part nearest to the sea. The ancients called the mariAfrica] Africa pars inferior. The part nearest to the sea. The ancients called the maritime parts of a country the lower parts, and the inland parts the higher, taking the notion, probably, from the course of the rivers. Lower Egypt was the part at the mouth of the Nile. was occupied by
Lower Egypt (Egypt) (search for this): chapter 18
for the Lybians are less warlike than the Getulians.Those who had spread toward our sea--for the Libyans are less warlike than the Getulians] Magis hi, qui ad nostrum mare processerant ; quia Libyes quám Gœtuli minùs bellicosi. The Persians and Getulians (under the name of Numidians), and their colonists, who were more toward the Mediterranean, and were more warlike than the Libyans (who were united with the Medes and Armenians) took from them portions of their territories by conquest. This is clearly the sense, as deducible from the preceding portion of the text. At last nearly all lower Africa/un>Lower Africa] Africa pars inferior. The part nearest to the sea. The ancients called the maritime parts of a country the lower parts, and the inland parts the higher, taking the notion, probably, from the course of the rivers. Lower Egypt was the part at the mouth of the Nile. was occupied by the Numidians; and all the conquered tribes were merged in the nation and name of their conquero
Sicily (Italy) (search for this): chapter 18
her by purchase or barter, from the Spaniards; for a wide sea, and an unknown tongue, were barriers to all intercourse. These, by degrees, formed intermarriages with the Getulians; and because, from constantly trying different soils, they were perpetually shifting their abodes, they called themselves NUMIDIANS.Numidians] Numidas. The same as Nomades, or wanderers a term applied to pastoral nations, and which, as Kritzius observes, the Africans must have had from the Greeks, perhaps those of Sicily. And to this day the huts of the Numidian boors, which they call mapalia, are of an oblong shape, with curved roofs; resembling the hulls of ships. The Medes and Armenians connected themselves with the Libyans, who dwelled near the African sea; while the Getulians lay more to the sun,"More to the sun] sub sole magis. I have borrowed this expression from Rose. The Getulians were more southward. not far from the torrid heats; and these soon built themselves towns,These soon built themselves to
Atlantic Ocean (search for this): chapter 18
nt is not worth discussion. having sailed over into Africa, occupied the parts nearest to our sea.Our sea] The Mediterranean. See above, c. 17. The Persians, however, settled more toward the ocean,More toward the Ocean] Intra oceanum magis. "Intra oceanum is differently explained by different commentators. Cortius, Müller and Gerlach, understand the parts bounded by the ocean, lying close upon it, and stretching toward the west; while Langius thinks that the regions more remote from the Atlantic Ocean, and extending toward the east, are meant. But Langius did not consider that those who had inverted keels of vessels for cottages, could not have strayed far from the ocean, but must have settled in parts bordering upon it. And this is what is signified by intra oceanum. For intra aliquam rem is not always used to denote what is actually in a thing, and circumscribed by its boundaries, but what approaches toward it, and reaches close to it."Kritzius. He then instances intra modum, intra
Numidia (Algeria) (search for this): chapter 18
by the Getulians and Libyans,XVIII. Getulians and Libyans] Gœtuli et Libyes. "See Pompon. Mel. i. 4; Plin. H. N. v. 4, 6, 8, v. 2, xxi. 13; Herod. iv. 159, 168."Gerlach The name Gœtuli, is, however, unknown to Herodotus. They lay to the south of Numidia and Mauretania. See Strabo, xvii. 3. Libyes is a term applied by the Greek writers properly to the Africans of the North coast, but frequently to the inhabitants of Africa in general. rude and uncivilized tribes, who subsisted on the flesh of wiGetulians united. the power rapidly increased; and at length, the children, through excess of population, separating from the parents, they took possession, under the name of Numidians, of those regions bordering on Carthage which are now called Numidia. In process of time, the two parties,The two parties] Utrique. The older Numidians, and the younger, who had emigrated toward Carthage. each assisting the other, reduced the neighboring tribes, by force or fear, under their sway; but those who h