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Browsing named entities in a specific section of M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). Search the whole document.

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Cyprus (Cyprus) (search for this): book 3, card 84
himself.' At this Metellus yielded from the path; And as the gates rolled backward, echoed loud Quoted by Dante and applied to the gates of Purgatory. 'Purg.,' ix., 129. The rock Tarpeian, and the temple's depths Gave up the treasure which for centuries No hand had touched: all that the Punic foe And Perses and Philippus conquered gave, And all the gold which Pyrrhus panic-struck Left when he fled: that gold,That is, the gold offered by Pyrrhus, and refused by Fabricius, which, after the final defeat of Pyrrhus, came into the possession of the victors. the price of Rome, Which yet Fabricius sold not, and the hoard Laid up by saving sires; the tribute sent By Asia's richest nations; and the wealth Which conquering Metellus brought from Crete, And Cato See Plutarch, 'Cato,' 34, 39. bore from distant Cyprus home; And last, the riches torn from captive kings And borne before Pompeius when he came In frequent triumph. Thus was robbed the shrine, And Caesar first brought poverty to Rome.
himself.' At this Metellus yielded from the path; And as the gates rolled backward, echoed loud Quoted by Dante and applied to the gates of Purgatory. 'Purg.,' ix., 129. The rock Tarpeian, and the temple's depths Gave up the treasure which for centuries No hand had touched: all that the Punic foe And Perses and Philippus conquered gave, And all the gold which Pyrrhus panic-struck Left when he fled: that gold,That is, the gold offered by Pyrrhus, and refused by Fabricius, which, after the final defeat of Pyrrhus, came into the possession of the victors. the price of Rome, Which yet Fabricius sold not, and the hoard Laid up by saving sires; the tribute sent By Asia's richest nations; and the wealth Which conquering Metellus brought from Crete, And Cato See Plutarch, 'Cato,' 34, 39. bore from distant Cyprus home; And last, the riches torn from captive kings And borne before Pompeius when he came In frequent triumph. Thus was robbed the shrine, And Caesar first brought poverty to Rome.
Italy (Italy) (search for this): book 3, card 84
road That separates the marsh, the grove sublime Near Aricia. (See Book VI., 93.) Where reigns the Scythian goddess, and the path By which men bear the fasces to the feast On Alba's summit. From the height afar- Gazing in awe upon the walls of Rome His native city, since the Northern war Unseen, unvisited-thus Caesar spake: 'Seat of the gods, have men deserted thee, 'Thee, Rome, without a blow? Then for what town 'Shall men do battle? Thank the gods, no host 'From Eastern climes has sought Italia's shores 'To wreak its fury; nor Sarmatian horde 'With northern tribes conjoined; by Fortune's gift 'This war is civil: else this coward chief 'Had been thy ruin.' Trembling at his feet He found the city: deadly fire and flame, As from a conqueror; gods and fanes dispersed; Such was the measure of their fear, as though His power and wish were one. No festal shout Greeted his march, no feigned acclaim of joy. Scarce had they time for hate. In Phoebus' hall Their hiding places left, a crowd ap
Terracina (Italy) (search for this): book 3, card 84
Now Anxur's hold was passed, the oozy road That separates the marsh, the grove sublime Near Aricia. (See Book VI., 93.) Where reigns the Scythian goddess, and the path By which men bear the fasces to the feast On Alba's summit. From the height afar- Gazing in awe upon the walls of Rome His native city, since the Northern war Unseen, unvisited-thus Caesar spake: 'Seat of the gods, have men deserted thee, 'Thee, Rome, without a blow? Then for what town 'Shall men do battle? Thank the gods, no host 'From Eastern climes has sought Italia's shores 'To wreak its fury; nor Sarmatian horde 'With northern tribes conjoined; by Fortune's gift 'This war is civil: else this coward chief 'Had been thy ruin.' Trembling at his feet He found the city: deadly fire and flame, As from a conqueror; gods and fanes dispersed; Such was the measure of their fear, as though His power and wish were one. No festal shout Greeted his march, no feigned acclaim of joy. Scarce had they time for hate. In Phoebus' ha
Aricia (Italy) (search for this): book 3, card 84
Now Anxur's hold was passed, the oozy road That separates the marsh, the grove sublime Near Aricia. (See Book VI., 93.) Where reigns the Scythian goddess, and the path By which men bear the fasces to the feast On Alba's summit. From the height afar- Gazing in awe upon the walls of Rome His native city, since the Northern war Unseen, unvisited-thus Caesar spake: 'Seat of the gods, have men deserted thee, 'Thee, Rome, without a blow? Then for what town 'Shall men do battle? Thank the gods, no host 'From Eastern climes has sought Italia's shores 'To wreak its fury; nor Sarmatian horde 'With northern tribes conjoined; by Fortune's gift 'This war is civil: else this coward chief 'Had been thy ruin.' Trembling at his feet He found the city: deadly fire and flame, As from a conqueror; gods and fanes dispersed; Such was the measure of their fear, as though His power and wish were one. No festal shout Greeted his march, no feigned acclaim of joy. Scarce had they time for hate. In Phoebus' hal
Crete (Greece) (search for this): book 3, card 84
himself.' At this Metellus yielded from the path; And as the gates rolled backward, echoed loud Quoted by Dante and applied to the gates of Purgatory. 'Purg.,' ix., 129. The rock Tarpeian, and the temple's depths Gave up the treasure which for centuries No hand had touched: all that the Punic foe And Perses and Philippus conquered gave, And all the gold which Pyrrhus panic-struck Left when he fled: that gold,That is, the gold offered by Pyrrhus, and refused by Fabricius, which, after the final defeat of Pyrrhus, came into the possession of the victors. the price of Rome, Which yet Fabricius sold not, and the hoard Laid up by saving sires; the tribute sent By Asia's richest nations; and the wealth Which conquering Metellus brought from Crete, And Cato See Plutarch, 'Cato,' 34, 39. bore from distant Cyprus home; And last, the riches torn from captive kings And borne before Pompeius when he came In frequent triumph. Thus was robbed the shrine, And Caesar first brought poverty to Rome.