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Ilerda (Spain) (search for this): book 4, card 1
s of Spanish tribes. The Celtiberi dwelt on the Ebro. swift, and Vettons lightly armed, And Celts who, exiled from their ancient home, Had joined 'Iberus' to their former name. Where the rich soil in gentle slope ascends And forms a modest hill, IlerdaLerida, on the river Segre, above its junction with the Ebro. Cinga is the modern Cinca, which falls into the Segre (Sicoris). stands, Founded in ancient days; beside her glides Not least of western rivers, Sicoris Of placid current, by a mighty their country and her broken laws. But Caesar, when from heaven fell the night, Drew round a hasty trench; his foremost rank With close array concealing those who wrought. Then with the morn he bids them seize the hill Which parted from the camp Ilerda's walls, And gave them safety. But in fear and shame On rushed the foe and seized the vantage ground, First in the onset. From the height they held Their hopes of conquest; but to Caesar's men Their hearts by courage stirred, and their good sword
ars back the inflowing ocean. Nor does night Acknowledge Phoebus' rise, for all the sky Feels her dominion and obscures its face, And darkness joins with darkness. Thus doth lie The lowest earth beneath the snowy zone And never-ending winters, where the sky Is starless ever, and no growth of herb Sprouts from the frozen earth; but standing ice Tempers The idea is that the cold of the poles tempers the heat of the equator. the stars which in the middle zone Kindle their flames. Thus, Father of the world, And thou, O trident-god who rul'st the sea Second in place, Neptunus, load the air With clouds continual; forbid the tide, Once risen, to return : forced by thy waves Let rivers backward run in different course, Thy shores no longer reaching; and the earth, Shaken, make way for floods. Let Rhine o'erflow And Rhone their banks; let torrents spread afield Unmeasured waters: melt Rhipaean snows: Spread lakes upon the land, and seas profound, And snatch the groaning world from civil war.
Hellespont (Turkey) (search for this): book 4, card 1
re the rising sun; And all the land,Meaning Spain, lying further to the west than Italy. there nearer to the sky That whelms the stars, was hard and arid grown By suns of winter. But when Titan neared The Ram, who, backward gazing on the stars, Bore perished Helle,Phrixus and Helle, the children of Nephele, were to be sacrificed to Zeus; but Nephele rescued them, and they rode away through the air on the Ram with the golden fleece. But Helle fell into the sea, which from her was named the Hellespont. (See Book IX., 1125.) The sun enters Aries about March 20. The Ram is pictured among the constellations with his head averse. and the hours were held In balance, and the days again prevailed, The earliest faded moon which in the vault Hung with uncertain horn, from eastern wind Received a fiery radiance; whose blast Forced Boreas back: and breaking on the mists Within his regions, to the Occident Drave all that shroud Arabia and the land Of Ganges; all that or by CaurusSee Book I., 464
Iberus (Spain) (search for this): book 4, card 1
There with the Romans in the camp were joined Asturians These are the names of Spanish tribes. The Celtiberi dwelt on the Ebro. swift, and Vettons lightly armed, And Celts who, exiled from their ancient home, Had joined 'Iberus' to their former namIberus' to their former name. Where the rich soil in gentle slope ascends And forms a modest hill, IlerdaLerida, on the river Segre, above its junction with the Ebro. Cinga is the modern Cinca, which falls into the Segre (Sicoris). stands, Founded in ancient days; beside her Ebro. Cinga is the modern Cinca, which falls into the Segre (Sicoris). stands, Founded in ancient days; beside her glides Not least of western rivers, Sicoris Of placid current, by a mighty arch Of stone o'erspanned, which not the winter floods Shall overwhelm. Upon a rock hard by Was Magnus' camp; but Caesar's on a hill, Rivalling the first; and in the midst a singa girds them in With greedy waves; forbidden to contend With tides of ocean; for that larger flood Who names the land, Iberus, sweeps along The lesser stream commingled with his own. Guiltless of war, the first day saw the hosts In long array conf
Cinca (Spain) (search for this): book 4, card 1
, Who ruled alternate, and the rampart guard Obeyed the standard of each chief in turn. There with the Romans in the camp were joined Asturians These are the names of Spanish tribes. The Celtiberi dwelt on the Ebro. swift, and Vettons lightly armed, And Celts who, exiled from their ancient home, Had joined 'Iberus' to their former name. Where the rich soil in gentle slope ascends And forms a modest hill, IlerdaLerida, on the river Segre, above its junction with the Ebro. Cinga is the modern Cinca, which falls into the Segre (Sicoris). stands, Founded in ancient days; beside her glides Not least of western rivers, Sicoris Of placid current, by a mighty arch Of stone o'erspanned, which not the winter floods Shall overwhelm. Upon a rock hard by Was Magnus' camp; but Caesar's on a hill, Rivalling the first; and in the midst a stream. Here boundless plains are spread beyond the range Of human vision; Cinga girds them in With greedy waves; forbidden to contend With tides of ocean; for tha
To swift fulfilment. There on Magnus' side Afranius and PetreiusBoth of these generals were able and distinguished officers. Afranius was slain by Caesar's soldiers after the battle of Thapsus. Petreins, after the same battle, escaped along with Juba; and failing to find a refuge, they challenged each other to fight. Petreius was killed, and Juba, the survivor, put an end to himself. held command, Who ruled alternate, and the rampart guard Obeyed the standard of each chief in turn. There withJuba, the survivor, put an end to himself. held command, Who ruled alternate, and the rampart guard Obeyed the standard of each chief in turn. There with the Romans in the camp were joined Asturians These are the names of Spanish tribes. The Celtiberi dwelt on the Ebro. swift, and Vettons lightly armed, And Celts who, exiled from their ancient home, Had joined 'Iberus' to their former name. Where the rich soil in gentle slope ascends And forms a modest hill, IlerdaLerida, on the river Segre, above its junction with the Ebro. Cinga is the modern Cinca, which falls into the Segre (Sicoris). stands, Founded in ancient days; beside her glides Not
Aries (Romania) (search for this): book 4, card 1
, lying further to the west than Italy. there nearer to the sky That whelms the stars, was hard and arid grown By suns of winter. But when Titan neared The Ram, who, backward gazing on the stars, Bore perished Helle,Phrixus and Helle, the children of Nephele, were to be sacrificed to Zeus; but Nephele rescued them, and they rode away through the air on the Ram with the golden fleece. But Helle fell into the sea, which from her was named the Hellespont. (See Book IX., 1125.) The sun enters Aries about March 20. The Ram is pictured among the constellations with his head averse. and the hours were held In balance, and the days again prevailed, The earliest faded moon which in the vault Hung with uncertain horn, from eastern wind Received a fiery radiance; whose blast Forced Boreas back: and breaking on the mists Within his regions, to the Occident Drave all that shroud Arabia and the land Of Ganges; all that or by CaurusSee Book I., 464. borne Bedim the Orient sky, or rising suns Pe
Lerida (Spain) (search for this): book 4, card 1
Petreius was killed, and Juba, the survivor, put an end to himself. held command, Who ruled alternate, and the rampart guard Obeyed the standard of each chief in turn. There with the Romans in the camp were joined Asturians These are the names of Spanish tribes. The Celtiberi dwelt on the Ebro. swift, and Vettons lightly armed, And Celts who, exiled from their ancient home, Had joined 'Iberus' to their former name. Where the rich soil in gentle slope ascends And forms a modest hill, IlerdaLerida, on the river Segre, above its junction with the Ebro. Cinga is the modern Cinca, which falls into the Segre (Sicoris). stands, Founded in ancient days; beside her glides Not least of western rivers, Sicoris Of placid current, by a mighty arch Of stone o'erspanned, which not the winter floods Shall overwhelm. Upon a rock hard by Was Magnus' camp; but Caesar's on a hill, Rivalling the first; and in the midst a stream. Here boundless plains are spread beyond the range Of human vision; Cinga g
ltiberi dwelt on the Ebro. swift, and Vettons lightly armed, And Celts who, exiled from their ancient home, Had joined 'Iberus' to their former name. Where the rich soil in gentle slope ascends And forms a modest hill, IlerdaLerida, on the river Segre, above its junction with the Ebro. Cinga is the modern Cinca, which falls into the Segre (Sicoris). stands, Founded in ancient days; beside her glides Not least of western rivers, Sicoris Of placid current, by a mighty arch Of stone o'erspanned,Segre (Sicoris). stands, Founded in ancient days; beside her glides Not least of western rivers, Sicoris Of placid current, by a mighty arch Of stone o'erspanned, which not the winter floods Shall overwhelm. Upon a rock hard by Was Magnus' camp; but Caesar's on a hill, Rivalling the first; and in the midst a stream. Here boundless plains are spread beyond the range Of human vision; Cinga girds them in With greedy waves; forbidden to contend With tides of ocean; for that larger flood Who names the land, Iberus, sweeps along The lesser stream commingled with his own. Guiltless of war, the first day saw the hosts In long array confronted; standard rose Opp
ars back the inflowing ocean. Nor does night Acknowledge Phoebus' rise, for all the sky Feels her dominion and obscures its face, And darkness joins with darkness. Thus doth lie The lowest earth beneath the snowy zone And never-ending winters, where the sky Is starless ever, and no growth of herb Sprouts from the frozen earth; but standing ice Tempers The idea is that the cold of the poles tempers the heat of the equator. the stars which in the middle zone Kindle their flames. Thus, Father of the world, And thou, O trident-god who rul'st the sea Second in place, Neptunus, load the air With clouds continual; forbid the tide, Once risen, to return : forced by thy waves Let rivers backward run in different course, Thy shores no longer reaching; and the earth, Shaken, make way for floods. Let Rhine o'erflow And Rhone their banks; let torrents spread afield Unmeasured waters: melt Rhipaean snows: Spread lakes upon the land, and seas profound, And snatch the groaning world from civil war.
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