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n, he knows that swords unsheathed Are wielded by the soldier, not the chief. No timorous voice was there; no silent wrath Concealed; nor doubting mind, as though alone Indignant at the wrong, and in distrust Of those in turn distrusting. Fear in each Had fled before the boldness of the host: The crime is free where thousands bear the guilt. They hurled their menace: 'Caesar, give us leave 'To quit thy crimes; thou seek'st by land and sea 'The sword to slay us; let the fields of Gaul And far Iberia, and the world proclaim 'How for thy victories our comrades fell. 'What boots it us that by an army's blood 'The Rhine and Rhone and all the northern lands 'Thou hast subdued? Thou giv'st us civil war 'For all these battles; such the prize. When fled 'The Senate trembling, and when Rome was ours 'What homes or temples did we spoil? Our hands 'Reek with offence! Aye, but our poverty 'Proclaims our innocence! What end shall be Of arms and armies? What shall be enough 'If Rome suffice not?
ed; nor doubting mind, as though alone Indignant at the wrong, and in distrust Of those in turn distrusting. Fear in each Had fled before the boldness of the host: The crime is free where thousands bear the guilt. They hurled their menace: 'Caesar, give us leave 'To quit thy crimes; thou seek'st by land and sea 'The sword to slay us; let the fields of Gaul And far Iberia, and the world proclaim 'How for thy victories our comrades fell. 'What boots it us that by an army's blood 'The Rhine and Rhone and all the northern lands 'Thou hast subdued? Thou giv'st us civil war 'For all these battles; such the prize. When fled 'The Senate trembling, and when Rome was ours 'What homes or temples did we spoil? Our hands 'Reek with offence! Aye, but our poverty 'Proclaims our innocence! What end shall be Of arms and armies? What shall be enough 'If Rome suffice not? and what lies beyond? 'Behold these silvered locks, these nerveless hands 'And shrunken arms, once stalwart! In thy wars 'Gone is
d:Reading galeam, with Francken, not glebam. ' Rather to feel the dear one's last embrace, ' And gain a humble but a separate tomb. 'Let sickness end old age. If Caesar's slaves, ' Let something more than battle be our doom. ' Deem'st thou we are thy dupes? that we alone ' In civil war are ignorant what crime ' Will fetch the highest price? What thou canst dare ' These years have proved, or nothing; law divine ' Nor human ordinance shall hold thine hand. 'He was our leader on the banks of Rhine; ' Now is our equal; for the stain of crime ' Makes all men like. And for a judge ingrate ' We waste our valour; for as fortune's gift ' He takes the victory which our arms have won: 'But we his fortunes are, his fates are ours 'To fashion as we will. Boast that the gods ' Shall do thy bidding! Nay, thy soldiers' will ' Shall close the war.' With threatening mien and speech Thus through the camp the troops demand their chief. When faith and loyalty are fled, and hope For aught but evil, thu
se? Not so: the heavenly gods ' Stoop not so low; fate has no time to judge ' Your lives and deaths. The fortunes of the world ' Follow heroic souls: for the fit few 'The many live; and you who terrified ' With me the northern and Iberian worlds, ' Would flee when led by Magnus. Strong with me ' Was Labienus:Labienus left Caesar's ranks after the Rubicon was crossed, and joined his rival. In his mouth Lucan puts the speech made at the oracle of Hammon in Book IX. He was slain at Munda, B.C. 45. vile deserter now; ' A homeless exile with his chief preferred. ' Nor were your faith more firm if, neither side 'Espoused, you ceased from arms. Who leaves me once, 'Though not to fight against me with the foe, 'Joins not my ranks again. Surely the gods 'Smile on these arms who for so great a war 'Grant me fresh soldiers. From what heavy load 'Fortune relieves me! for the hands which aimed 'At all, to which the world did not suffice, 'I now disarm, and for myself alone 'Reserve the conflict