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Browsing named entities in a specific section of M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). Search the whole document.

Found 15 total hits in 5 results.

Leucas (Greece) (search for this): book 5, card 476
But Caesar's mind though frenzied for the fight Was forced to pause until Antonius brought The rearward troops; Antonius even now Rehearsing Leucas' fight. With prayers and threats Caesar exhorts him. ' Why delay the fates, Thou cause of evil to the suffering world? My speed hath won the major part: from thee Fortune demands the final stroke alone. Do Libyan whirlpools with deceitful tides Uncertain separate us? Is the deep Untried to which I call? To unknown risks Art thou commanded? Caesar bids thee come, Thou sluggard, not to leave him. Long ago I ran my ships midway through sands and shoals To harbours held by foes; and dost thou fear My friendly camp? I mourn the waste of days 'Which fate allotted us. Upon the waves And winds I call unceasing: hold not back Thy willing troops, but let them dare the sea; Here gladly shall they come to join my camp, Though risking shipwreck: with indignant voice I call upon thee. Not in equal shares 'The world has fallen between us: thou alone Do
e knew that daring deeds Are safely wrought beneath the smile of heaven: And thus he hoped in fragile boat to cross The stormy billows fearful to a fleet. Now gentle night had brought repose from arms; And sleep, blest guardian of the poor man's couch, Restored the weary; and the camp was still. The hour was come that called the second watch When mighty Caesar, in the silence vast With cautious tread advanced to such a deed Caesar himself says nothing of this adventure. But it is mentioned by Dion, Appian and Plutarch ('Caesar,' 38). Dean Merivale thinks the story may have been invented to introduce the apophthegm used by Caesar to the sailor, 'Fear nothing: you carry Caesar and his fortunes' (line 665 post). Mommsen accepts the story, as of an attempt which was only abandoned because no mariner could be induced to undertake it. Lucan colours it with his wildest and most exaggerated hyperbole. As slaves should dare not. Fortune for his guide, Alone he passes on, and o'er the guard Stre
Bruttium (Italy) (search for this): book 5, card 476
with labouring boat 'To reach the shore ere yet the nearest land 'May be too distant.' But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: ' Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, 'Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just-thou dost not know 'Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, 'Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer. 'Break through the middle storm and trust in me. 'The burden of this fight falls not on us But on the sky and ocean; and our bark Shall swim the billows safe in him it bears. Nor shall the wind rage long: the boat itself Shall calm the waters. Flee the nearest shore, Steer for the ocean with unswerving hand: Then in the deep, when to our ship and us No other port is given, believe thou hast 'Calabria's harbours. And dost thou not know 'The purpose of such havoc? Fortune seeks 'In all this tumult of the sea and sky A boon for Caesar.'
ome, Thou sluggard, not to leave him. Long ago I ran my ships midway through sands and shoals To harbours held by foes; and dost thou fear My friendly camp? I mourn the waste of days 'Which fate allotted us. Upon the waves And winds I call unceasing: hold not back Thy willing troops, but let them dare the sea; Here gladly shall they come to join my camp, Though risking shipwreck: with indignant voice I call upon thee. Not in equal shares 'The world has fallen between us: thou alone Dost hold Italia, but Epirus I And all the lords of Rome.' Twice called and thrice Antonius lingered still: but Caesar's mind Was that he failed the gods, not they his cause. By night he braved the strait which others feared Though bidden: for he knew that daring deeds Are safely wrought beneath the smile of heaven: And thus he hoped in fragile boat to cross The stormy billows fearful to a fleet. Now gentle night had brought repose from arms; And sleep, blest guardian of the poor man's couch, Restored the we
Epirus (Greece) (search for this): book 5, card 476
uggard, not to leave him. Long ago I ran my ships midway through sands and shoals To harbours held by foes; and dost thou fear My friendly camp? I mourn the waste of days 'Which fate allotted us. Upon the waves And winds I call unceasing: hold not back Thy willing troops, but let them dare the sea; Here gladly shall they come to join my camp, Though risking shipwreck: with indignant voice I call upon thee. Not in equal shares 'The world has fallen between us: thou alone Dost hold Italia, but Epirus I And all the lords of Rome.' Twice called and thrice Antonius lingered still: but Caesar's mind Was that he failed the gods, not they his cause. By night he braved the strait which others feared Though bidden: for he knew that daring deeds Are safely wrought beneath the smile of heaven: And thus he hoped in fragile boat to cross The stormy billows fearful to a fleet. Now gentle night had brought repose from arms; And sleep, blest guardian of the poor man's couch, Restored the weary; and the