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Browsing named entities in a specific section of M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). Search the whole document.

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mount Grateful to sailors for its nightly gleam: But to the bounds of Egypt hardly won With battling canvas, where divided Nile Pours through the shallows his Pelusian stream.That is, he reached the most eastern mouth of the Nile instead of the westeNile instead of the western. Now was the season when the heavenly scale Most nearly balances the varying hours, Once only equal; for the wintry day Repays to night her losses of the spring; And Magnus learning that th' Egyptian king Lay by Mount Casius, ere the sun was set Oe At Memphis was the well in which the rise and fall of the water acted as a Nilometer (Mr Haskins's note). Of fertilising Nile. While he was priest Not only once had Apis Comp. Herodotus, Book III., 27. Apis was a god who appeared at intervals in thvictim? By what trust in us 'Cam'st thou, unhappy? Scarce our people tills ' The fields, though softened by the refluent Nile: ' Know well our strength, and know we can no more. 'Rome 'neath the ruin of Pompeius lies: 'Shalt thou, O king, uphold hi
Memphis (Egypt) (search for this): book 8, card 456
e In rapid gallop to the trembling court Brought news their guest was come. Short was the time For counsel given; but in haste were met All who advised the base Pellaean king, Monsters, inhuman; there Achoreus sat Less harsh in failing years, in Memphis born Of empty rites, and guardian of the rise At Memphis was the well in which the rise and fall of the water acted as a Nilometer (Mr Haskins's note). Of fertilising Nile. While he was priest Not only once had Apis Comp. Herodotus, Book III., 2Memphis was the well in which the rise and fall of the water acted as a Nilometer (Mr Haskins's note). Of fertilising Nile. While he was priest Not only once had Apis Comp. Herodotus, Book III., 27. Apis was a god who appeared at intervals in the shape of a calf with a white mark on his brow. His appearance was the occasion of general rejoicing. Cambyses slew the Apis which came in his time, and for this cause became mad, as the Egyptians said. lived the space Marked by the crescent on his sacred brow. First was his voice, for Magnus raised and troth And for the pledges of the king deceased: But, skilled in counsel meet for shameless minds And tyrant hearts, Pothinus, dared to claim Ju
Thessaly (Greece) (search for this): book 8, card 456
rms. 'What Magnus owned not ere the war was done, No more shall Caesar. Driven from all the world, 'Trusting no more to Fortune, now he seeks 'Some foreign nation which may share his fate. 'Shades of the slaughtered in the civil war 'Compel him: nor from Caesar's arms alone 'But from the Senate also does he fly, 'Whose blood outpoured has gorged Thessalian fowl; 'Monarchs he fears whose all he has destroyed, 'And nations piled in one ensanguined heap, 'By him deserted. Victim of the blow 'Thessalia dealt, refused in every land, ' He asks for help from ours not yet betrayed. ' But none than Egypt with this chief from Rome ' Has juster quarrel; who has sought with arms ' To stain our Pharos, distant from the strife 'And peaceful ever, and to make our realm 'Suspected by his victor. Why alone 'Should this our country please thee in thy fall? ' Why bring'st thou here the burden of thy fates, ' Pharsalia's curse? In Caesar's eyes long since 'We have offence which by the sword alone ' Can
ts southern cape, and struck across the main With winds transverse and tides; nor reached the mount Grateful to sailors for its nightly gleam: But to the bounds of Egypt hardly won With battling canvas, where divided Nile Pours through the shallows his Pelusian stream.That is, he reached the most eastern mouth of the Nile instead oldst not reign, 'Resign thy sceptre, for the ties of blood 'Speak for thy banished sister. Let her rule 'O'er Nile and Pharos: we shall at the least 'Preserve our Egypt from the Latian arms. 'What Magnus owned not ere the war was done, No more shall Caesar. Driven from all the world, 'Trusting no more to Fortune, now he seeks 'So one ensanguined heap, 'By him deserted. Victim of the blow 'Thessalia dealt, refused in every land, ' He asks for help from ours not yet betrayed. ' But none than Egypt with this chief from Rome ' Has juster quarrel; who has sought with arms ' To stain our Pharos, distant from the strife 'And peaceful ever, and to make our realm '
Cyprus (Cyprus) (search for this): book 8, card 456
For Cyprus then They shaped their course, whose altars more than all The goddess loves who from the Paphian wave Sprang, mindful of her birth, if such be truth, And gods have origin. Past the craggy isle Pompeius sailing, left at length astern Its southern cape, and struck across the main With winds transverse and tides; nor reached the mount Grateful to sailors for its nightly gleam: But to the bounds of Egypt hardly won With battling canvas, where divided Nile Pours through the shallows his Pelusian stream.That is, he reached the most eastern mouth of the Nile instead of the western. Now was the season when the heavenly scale Most nearly balances the varying hours, Once only equal; for the wintry day Repays to night her losses of the spring; And Magnus learning that th' Egyptian king Lay by Mount Casius, ere the sun was set Or flagged his canvas, thither steered his ship. Already had a horseman from the shore In rapid gallop to the trembling court Brought news their guest was come.