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is; and that methinks you should know best, for even now a leg of his you have at supper, and all your wealth besides is come unto you by that saccage." He then adds, by way of Note, "For Augustus C├Žsar defeited Antonie, and was mightily enriched by the spoile of him." As regards statues of human beings, Gorgias of LeontiniIn Sicily. According to Valerius Maximus and other writers, a statue of solid gold was erected by the whole of Greece, in the temple at Delphi, in honour of Gorgias, who was distinguished for his eloquence and literary attainments. The leading opinion of Gorgias was, that nothing had any real existence. was the first to erect a solid statue of gold, in the Temple at Delphi, in honour of himself, about the seventiethThe ninetieth Olympiad, about the year 420 B.C., is much more probably the correct reading; as it was about the seventieth Olympiad, or somewhat later, that Gorgias was born. Olympiad: so great were the fortunes then made by teaching the art of oratory!