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rtist, made statues of Aleibiades and of his mother Demarate,Called Dinomache by Plutarch. who is represented sacrificing by the light of torches. TisicratesAlready mentioned as a successful pupil of Lysippus. executed a two-horse chariot in brass, in which Piston afterwards placed the figure of a female. Piston also made the statues of Mars and Mercury, which are in the Temple of Concord at Rome. No one can commend Perillus;He was probably a native of Agrigentum, and flourished about B.C. 560. The brazen bull of Perillus, and his unhappy fate, are recorded by many of the classical writers, among others by Valerius Maximus, B. ix. cc. 2, 9, and by Ovid, Art. Am. B. i. ll. 653-4.—B. more cruel even than the tyrant PhalarisSee B. vii. c. 57. himself, he made for him a brazen bull, asserting that when a man was enclosed in it, and fire applied beneath, the cries of the man would resemble the roaring of a bull: however, with a cruelty in this instance marked by justice, the experiment
above-named classes of works, has distinguished himself more particularly by his Trumpeter, and his Child in Tears, caressing its murdered mother. The Woman in Admiration, of Eubulus, is highly praised; and so is the Man, by Eubulides,Works of his at Athens are mentioned by Pausanias, B. i. c. 2, who also states that he was father of Euohir, the Athenian. reckoning on his Fingers. MiconA statuary of Syracuse, son of Niceratus. He made two statues of Hiero Il., king of Syracuse, who died B.C. 215. He must not be confounded with the painter and statuary of the same name, mentioned in B. xxxiii. c. 56, and B. xxxv. c. 35. He is mentioned also by Pausanias. is admired for his athletes; Menogenes, for his four-horse chariots. Niceratus,An Athenian, son of Euctemon. He is mentioned also by Tatian, and is supposed by Sillig to have flourished about B.C. 420. too, who attempted every kind of work that had been executed by any other artist, made statues of Aleibiades and of his mother Demarat
alents by way of portion. and so called because the dragons on its Gorgon's head vibrate at the sound of the lyre; also an equestrian statue of Simon, the first writer on the art of equitation.He is mentioned by Xenophon, according to whom, he dedicated the brazen statue of a horse in the Eleusinium at Athens. He was probably an Athenian by birth. Dædalus,Son of Patroclus, who is previously mentioned as having lived in the 95th Olympiad. He was a native of Sicyon, and flourished about B.C. 400. Several works of his are also mentioned by Pausanias. who is highly esteemed as a modeller in clay, made two brazen figures of youths using the body-scraper;Or "strigil." See Note 19 above. and Dinomenes executed figures of ProtesilaüsThe first Grecian slain at Troy. and Pythodemus the wrestler. The statue of Alexander Paris is the work of Euphranor:Famous also as a painter. See B. xxxv. c. 40.—B. Paris, the son of Priam, was known by both of these names. it is much admired, because we recog
tignotus, a Perixyomenos,A man "scraping himself," probably. See Note 19, page 175. The "Tyrannicides" were Harmodius and Aristogiton. and figures of the Tyrannicides, already mentioned. Antimachus and Athenodorus made some statues of females of noble birth; AristodemusTatian mentions an artist of this name. executed figures of wrestlers, two-horse chariots with the charioteers, philosophers, aged women, and a statue of King Seleucus:Sillig thinks that this was Seleucus, king of Babylon, B.C. 312. his Doryphoros,See Note 70 above too, possesses his characteristic gracefulness. There were two artists of the name of Cephisodotus:Pausanias, B. viii., gives an account of a statue of Diana, made of Pentelican marble, by this Cephisodotus, a native of Athens; he is supposed to have flourished in the 102nd Olympiad. In the commencement of this Chapter, Pliny has enumerated a Cephisodotus among the artists of the 120th Olympiad.—B. the earlier of them made a figure of Mercury nursing Fathe
koning on his Fingers. MiconA statuary of Syracuse, son of Niceratus. He made two statues of Hiero Il., king of Syracuse, who died B.C. 215. He must not be confounded with the painter and statuary of the same name, mentioned in B. xxxiii. c. 56, and B. xxxv. c. 35. He is mentioned also by Pausanias. is admired for his athletes; Menogenes, for his four-horse chariots. Niceratus,An Athenian, son of Euctemon. He is mentioned also by Tatian, and is supposed by Sillig to have flourished about B.C. 420. too, who attempted every kind of work that had been executed by any other artist, made statues of Aleibiades and of his mother Demarate,Called Dinomache by Plutarch. who is represented sacrificing by the light of torches. TisicratesAlready mentioned as a successful pupil of Lysippus. executed a two-horse chariot in brass, in which Piston afterwards placed the figure of a female. Piston also made the statues of Mars and Mercury, which are in the Temple of Concord at Rome. No one can commen
atues, and was the author of some treatises on his art. Several artists have represented the battles fought by Attalus and Eumenes with the Galli;The Galli here spoken of were a tribe of the Celts, who invaded Asia Minor, and afterwards uniting with the Greeks, settled in a portion of Bithynia, which hence acquired the name of Gallo-Græcia or Galatia.—B. Isigonus, for instance, Pyromachus, Stratonicus, and Antigonus,See end of B. xxxiii. Attalus I., king of Pergamus, conquered the Galli, B.C. 239. Pyromachus has been mentioned a few lines before, and Stratonicus, in B. xxxiii. c. 55, also by Athenæus. who also wrote some works in reference to his art. Boëthus,A native of Carthage. A work of his is mentioned by Cicero, In Verrem 4, 14, and in the Culex, 1. 66, attributed to Virgil. See also B. xxxiii. c. 55. although more celebrated for his works in silver, has executed a beautiful figure of a child strangling a goose. The most celebrated of all the works, of which I have here spoken,
ed statues of philosophers. Colotes,The elder artist of this name. See B. xxxv. c. 34. who assisted Phidias in the Olympian Jupiter, also executed statues of philosophers; the same, too, with Cleon,A native of Sicyon; Pausanias, B. v. cc. 17, 21, informs us that Cleon made a statue of Venus and two statues of Jupiter; he also mentions others of his works in B. vi.—B. Cenchramis, Callicles,A native of Megara. He made a 'statue of Diagoras the pugilist, who was victor at the Olympic games, B.C. 464. He is mentioned also by Pausanias. and Cepis. Chalcosthenes made statues of comedians and athletes. DaïppusProbably the same with the "Laïppus" mentioned in the early part of this Chapter. Silling, Diet. Ancient Artists, considers "Daïppus" to be the right name. executed a Perixyomenos.See Note 26 above. Daïphron, Democritus,A native of Sicyon, and pupil of Pison, according to Pausanias, B. vi. c. 3. He flourished about the 100th Olympiad. and Dæmon made statues of philosophers. Epigonus, wh