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ote. of the same name, and then another called Capraria, which is infested by multitudes of huge lizards. According to the same author, in sight of these islands is Ninguaria,Or "Snow Island," the same as that previously called Invallis, the modern Teneriffe, with its snow-capped peak. which has received that name from its perpetual snows; this island abounds also in fogs. The one next to it is Canaria;So called from its canine inhabitants. it contains vast multitudes of dogs of very large size, two of which were brought home to Juba: there are some traces of buildings to be seen here. While all these islands abound in fruit and birds of every kind, this one produces in great numbers the date palm which bears the caryota, also pine nuts. Honey too abounds here, and in the rivers papyrus, and the fish called silurus,As to the silurus, see B. ix. c. 17. are found. These islands, however, are greatly annoyed by the putrefying bodies of monsters, which are constantly thrown up by the sea.