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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh). Search the whole document.

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s, either scarceB.C. 195 finished or soon to come, an incident occurred, trivial to relate, but which, by reason of the passions it aroused, developed into a violent contention. Marcus Fundanius and Lucius Valerius, tribunes of the people, proposed to the assembly the abrogation of the Oppian law. The tribune Gaius Oppius had carried this law in the heat of the Punic War, in the consulship of Quintus Fabius and Tiberius Sempronius,Sempronius was consul with Fabius (Cunctator) in 215 B.C., and with his son in 213 B.C. The former date for the law is more probable: see vi. 9 and viii. 3 below. that no woman should possess more than half an ounce of gold or wear a parti-colouredParticularly one trimmed with purple. garment or ride in a carriage in the City or in a town within a mile thereof, except on the occasion of a religious festival. The tribunes Marcus and Publius Iunius Brutus were supporting the Oppian law, and averred that they would not permit its repeal; many d
hed or soon to come, an incident occurred, trivial to relate, but which, by reason of the passions it aroused, developed into a violent contention. Marcus Fundanius and Lucius Valerius, tribunes of the people, proposed to the assembly the abrogation of the Oppian law. The tribune Gaius Oppius had carried this law in the heat of the Punic War, in the consulship of Quintus Fabius and Tiberius Sempronius,Sempronius was consul with Fabius (Cunctator) in 215 B.C., and with his son in 213 B.C. The former date for the law is more probable: see vi. 9 and viii. 3 below. that no woman should possess more than half an ounce of gold or wear a parti-colouredParticularly one trimmed with purple. garment or ride in a carriage in the City or in a town within a mile thereof, except on the occasion of a religious festival. The tribunes Marcus and Publius Iunius Brutus were supporting the Oppian law, and averred that they would not permit its repeal; many distinguished men came forward