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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh). Search the whole document.

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It was now the end of the year, and canvassing at the consular election was more spirited than ever before.Probably for this reason we have an unusually detailed account of the campaign and we get a clear impression of the arguments employed. The candidates were many and influential, patricians and plebeians,The Licinian-Sextian legislation of 367 B.C. provided that one consul must be a plebeian and both might be. It was customary to elect one from each order. Publius CorneliusB.C. 193 Scipio, the son of Gnaeus, who had recently returned from Spain after performing great deeds,Cf. i. 3 ff. above. and Lucius Quinctius Flamininus, who had commanded the fleet in Greece,Cf. XXXII. xvi. 9, etc. and Gnaeus Manlius Volso;He had been praetor in 195 B.C. (XXXIII. xlii. 7). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnae
as Scipio's, and the greater it was, the more it was exposed to jealousy; that of Quinctius was fresher, inasmuch as he had triumphed that very year.Cf. XXXIV. lii. 4 ff. There was also the fact that the other had been for about ten years constantly in the public eye, a fact which renders prominent men less venerated from sheer surfeit of seeing them: he had been consul for the second time after the defeat of Hannibal and censor;His second consulship was in 194 B.C., his censorship in 198 B.C. in the case of Quinctius, everything was new and fresh for winning favour; he had neither asked anything from the people since his triumph nor obtained anything. He said that he was campaigning for a real brother, not a cousin, for his lieutenant and a sharer in the conduct of theB.C. 193 war; he on land, his brother on the sea, had conducted the operations. By such arguments he brought it to pass that his brother was preferred to the candidate whom his brother, Africanus,
. xvi. 9, etc. and Gnaeus Manlius Volso;He had been praetor in 195 B.C. (XXXIII. xlii. 7). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnaeus Domitius,He was praetor in 194 B.C. (XXXIV. xlii. 4). Gaius Livius Salinator,Probably, but not certainly, the man mentioned in v. 8 above. and Manius Acilius.He had been plebeian aedile in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 2). The circumstantial quality of Livy's details increases our confidence in his accuracy in the account of the campaign. But the eyes of all men were turned upon Quinctius and Cornelius; for both were patricians, contending for one place, and recently-won military glory lent favour to each. But before all else, the brothers of the candidatesAfricanus and Nasica were actually cousins, but Roman nomenclature is sometimes slightly vague on such points. The Flaminini were r
der. Publius CorneliusB.C. 193 Scipio, the son of Gnaeus, who had recently returned from Spain after performing great deeds,Cf. i. 3 ff. above. and Lucius Quinctius Flamininus, who had commanded the fleet in Greece,Cf. XXXII. xvi. 9, etc. and Gnaeus Manlius Volso;He had been praetor in 195 B.C. (XXXIII. xlii. 7). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnaeus Domitius,He was praetor in 194 B.C. (XXXIV. xlii. 4). Gaius Livius Salinator,Probably, but not certainly, the man mentioned in v. 8 above. and Manius Acilius.He had been plebeian aedile in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 2). The circumstantial quality of Livy's details increases our confidence in his accuracy in the account of the campaign. But the eyes of all men were turned upon Quinctius and Cornelius; for both were patricians, contending for one place, and recentl
idates were many and influential, patricians and plebeians,The Licinian-Sextian legislation of 367 B.C. provided that one consul must be a plebeian and both might be. It was customary to elect one from each order. Publius CorneliusB.C. 193 Scipio, the son of Gnaeus, who had recently returned from Spain after performing great deeds,Cf. i. 3 ff. above. and Lucius Quinctius Flamininus, who had commanded the fleet in Greece,Cf. XXXII. xvi. 9, etc. and Gnaeus Manlius Volso;He had been praetor in 195 B.C. (XXXIII. xlii. 7). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnaeus Domitius,He was praetor in 194 B.C. (XXXIV. xlii. 4). Gaius Livius Salinator,Probably, but not certainly, the man mentioned in v. 8 above. and Manius Acilius.He had been plebeian aedile in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 2). The circumstantial quality of Livy's details
). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnaeus Domitius,He was praetor in 194 B.C. (XXXIV. xlii. 4). Gaius Livius Salinator,Probably, but not certainly, the man mentioned in v. 8 above. and Manius Acilius.He had been plebeian aedile in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 2). The circumstantial quality of Livy's details increases our confiden for about ten years constantly in the public eye, a fact which renders prominent men less venerated from sheer surfeit of seeing them: he had been consul for the second time after the defeat of Hannibal and censor;His second consulship was in 194 B.C., his censorship in 198 B.C. in the case of Quinctius, everything was new and fresh for winning favour; he had neither asked anything from the people since his triumph nor obtained anything. He said that he was campaigning for a real brothe