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Corcyra (Greece) (search for this): narrative 337
after noone, we had sight of a rocke called Il fano, 48 miles from Corfu , and by sunne set we discovered Corfu . Thus we kept on our course Corfu . Thus we kept on our course with a prosperous winde, and made our way after twelve mile every houre. Most part of this way we were accompanied with certaine fishes callad sight of Cavo de santa Maria in Albania , on our right hand, and Corfu on the left hand. This night we ankered before the castles of CorfuCorfu , and went on land and refreshed our selves. The 18. by meanes of a friend we were licenced to enter the castle or fortresse of Corfu , whCorfu , which is not onely of situation the strongest I have seene, but also of edification. It hath for the Inner warde two strong castles situated on under the Turke, but in it are many Christians. All the horsemen of Corfu are Albaneses; the Island is not above 80. or 90. miles in compasse. The 19. 20. and 21. we remained in the towne of Corfu . The 22. day wee went aboord and set saile, the wind being very calme wee toed
Apulia (Italy) (search for this): narrative 337
over against this Iland lyeth a hill called Monte S. Angelo, upon the coast of Puglia in Italy , and we had sight of both landes at one time. The 23 we sayled als are thirtie miles distant from Ragusa . The 27 we kept our course towards Puglia , and left Albania on the left hand. The 28. we had sight of both the maines, but we were neerer the coast of Puglia , for feare of Foystes. It is betweene Cape Chimera in Albania and Cape otranto in Puglia 60 miles. Puglia is a plaine low Puglia 60 miles. Puglia is a plaine low lande, and Chimera in Albania is very high land, so that it is scene the further. Thus sayling our course along the coast of Puglia , we saw diverse white Towers, wPuglia is a plaine low lande, and Chimera in Albania is very high land, so that it is scene the further. Thus sayling our course along the coast of Puglia , we saw diverse white Towers, which serve for sea-markes. About three of the clocke in the after noone, we had sight of a rocke called Il fano, 48 miles from Corfu , and by sunne set we discoveredPuglia , we saw diverse white Towers, which serve for sea-markes. About three of the clocke in the after noone, we had sight of a rocke called Il fano, 48 miles from Corfu , and by sunne set we discovered Corfu . Thus we kept on our course with a prosperous winde, and made our way after twelve mile every houre. Most part of this way we were accompanied with certain
Aulon (Albania) (search for this): narrative 337
e ship was in an uprore with weapons, and had it not bene rather by Gods helpe, and the wisedome and patience of the patrone, more then by our procurement, there had bene that night a great slaughter. But as God would, there was no hurt, but onely the beginner was put under hatches, and with the fall hurt his face very sore. All this night the wind blew at Southeast, and sent us forward. The 24. in the morning wee found our selves before an Island called Saseno, which is in the entrie to Valona , and the wind prosperous. The 25. day we were before the hils of Antiveri, and about sunne set wee passed Ragusa , and three houres within night we ankered within Meleda, having Sclavonia or Dalmatia on the right hand of us, and the winde Southwest. The 26 in the morning we set sayle, and passed the channell between Sclavonia and Meleda, which may be eight mile over at the most. This Iland is under the Raguses. At after noone with a hard gale at west and by north we entered the channel
Bethlehem (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): narrative 337
simum Domini nostri Jesu Christi sepulchrum, e quo die tertia gloriosus a mortuis resurrexit, sacratissimum Calvariae montem, in quo pro nobis omnibus cruci affixus mori dignatus est, Sion etiam montem ubi coenam illam mirificam cum discipulis suis fecit, & ubi spiritus sanctus in die sancto Pentecostes in discipulos eosdem in linguis igneis descendit, Olivetique montem ubi mirabiliter coelos ascendit, intemeratae virginis Mariae Mausoleum in Josaphat vallis medio situm, Bethaniam quoque, Bethlehem civitatem David in qua de purissima virgine Maria natus est, ibique inter animalia reclinatus, pluraque loca alia tam in Hierusalem civitate sancta terre Judaaeae, quam extra, a modernis peregrinis visitari solita, devotissime visitavit, pariterque adoravit. In quorum fidem, ego frater Anthonius de Bergamo ordinis fratrum minorum regularis observantiae, provinciae divi Anthonii Sacri conventus montis Sion vicarius (licet indignus) necnon aliorum locorum terrae Sanctae, apostol
Zante (California, United States) (search for this): narrative 337
ing their top sailes, for if they doe not, the towne will shoot at them. This day toward 2. of the clocke wee passed by the Island of Prodeno, which is but litle, and desert, under the Turke. About 2. houres before night, we had sight of the Islands of Zante and Cephalonia , which are from Modon one hundreth miles. The 12. day in the morning, with the wind at West, we doubled between Castle Torneste, and the Island of Zante. This castle is on the firme land under the Turke. This night we aIsland of Zante. This castle is on the firme land under the Turke. This night we ankred afore the towne of Zante , where we that night went on land, and rested there the 13. 14. and 15. at night we were warned aboord by the patrone. This night the ship tooke in vitailes and other necessaries. The 16. in the morning we set saile with a prosperous wind, and the 17. we had sight of Cavo de santa Maria in Albania , on our right hand, and Corfu on the left hand. This night we ankered before the castles of Corfu , and went on land and refreshed our selves. The 18. by mean
Cyprus (Cyprus) (search for this): narrative 337
miles, and there we mette with two Venetian ships, which came from Cyprus , we thought they would have spoken with us, for we were desirous tea it is white, and it lieth into the sea Southwest. This coast of Cyprus is high declining toward the sea, but it hath no cliffes. The 2hurch we sawe the tombe of king Jaques, which was the last king of Cyprus , and was buried in the yere of Christ one thousand foure hundred sand by means of that mariage the Venetians chalenge the kingdom of Cyprus . The first of October in the morning, we went to see the reliefe . The sixt day we rid to Nicosia , which is from Arnacho seven Cyprus miles, which are one and twentie Italian miles. This is the anci not strong neither of walles nor situation: It is by report three Cyprus miles about, it is not throughly inhabited, but hath many great gany named Anthonie Gelber of Prussia, who onely tooke his surfet of Cyprus wine. This night we determined to ride a trie, because the wind
Crete (Greece) (search for this): narrative 337
shippe called the Mathew Gonson, which was bound for Livorno , or Legorne and Candia . It fell out that we touched in the beginning of Aprill next ensuing at Cades the Turkes gallies, that came from Rhodes, which were about Modon , Coron, and Candia , for which cause we kept at the sea. The second of August we had no sight onts, which are Greeks, and they live chiefly on milke and cheese. The Iland of Candia is 700 miles about, it is in length, from Cape Spada, to Cape Salomon, 300 mille to make one hundred thousand fighting men. We sayled betweene the Gozi, and Candia , and they are distant from Candia 5 or 6 miles. The Candiots are strong men, Candia 5 or 6 miles. The Candiots are strong men, and very good archers, and shoot neere the marke. This Ilande is from Zante 300 miles. The seventh we sayled all along the sayd Iland with little winde and unstablre, whereby we recovered the way which we had lost, and sailed out of sight of Candia . The 9. we sailed all day with a prosperous wind after 14. mile an houre: and
. This is a pretie towne walled about and built upon the sea side, having on the toppe of a round hill a faire Church. This Iland is under the Venetians, there grow very good vines, also that part toward Dalmatia is well peopled and husbanded, especially for wines. In the said Iland we met with the Venetian armie, to wit, tenne gallies, and three foystes. All that night we remained there. The 27 we set sayle and passed along the Iland, and towards afternoone we passed in before the Iland of Augusta, and about sunne set before the towne of Lesina , whereas I am informed by the Italians, they take all the Sardinas that they spend in Italy . This day we had a prosperous winde at Southeast. The Iland of Lesina is under the Venetians, a very fruitfull Iland adjoyning to the maine of Dalmatia , we left it on our right hand, and passed along. The 28 in the morning we were in the Gulfe of Quernero, and about two houres after noone we were before the cape of Istria , and at sunne set
Famagusta (Cyprus) (search for this): narrative 337
to the heapes. This night at midnight we rode to Famagusta , which is eight leagues from Salina , which is 24he 29 about two houres before day, we alighted at Famagusta , and after we were refreshed we went to see the taint Katherin was borne. This Chappell is in olde Famagusta , the which was destroyed by Englishmen, and is clbes and vautes with sepulchers in them. This olde Famagusta is from the other, foure miles, and standeth on a new towne on a plaine. Thence we returned to new Famagusta againe to dinner, and toward evening we went abou it be one of them or no, I know not. The aire of Famagusta is very unwholesome, as they say, by reason of ceh men and women. Their living is better cheape in Famagusta then in any other place of the Island, because th which inforcement was done to her by the king of Famagusta . The sixt day we rid to Nicosia , which is fr that rate of their money. They of the limites of Famagusta do keep the statutes of ye Frenchmen which someti
Capua (Italy) (search for this): narrative 337
inding of the tombe there was also found a yard under ground, a square stone somewhat longer than broad, upon which stone was found a writing of two severall handes writing, the one as it seemed, for himselfe, and the other for his wife, and under the same stone was found a glasse somewhat proportioned like an urinall, but that it was eight square and very thicke, wherein were the ashes of the head and right arme of Mar. T. Cicero, for as stories make mention he was beheaded as I remember at Capua , for insurrection. And his wife having got his head and right arme, (which was brought to Rome to the Emperour´╝ë went from Rome, and came to Zante , and there buried his head and arme, and wrote upon his tombe this style M. T. Cicero. Have. Then followeth in other letters, Et tu Terentia Antonia, which difference of letters declare that they were not written both at one time. The tombe is long and narrowe, and deepe, walled on every side like a grave, in the botome whereof was found the sayd
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