hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
England (United Kingdom) 1,858 0 Browse Search
China (China) 630 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 620 0 Browse Search
Goa (Goa, India) 614 0 Browse Search
Guiana (Guyana) 580 0 Browse Search
Russia (Russia) 568 0 Browse Search
Peru (Peru) 506 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico) 490 0 Browse Search
Ormus (Iran) 482 0 Browse Search
Pegu (Myanmar) 460 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

Found 59 total hits in 15 results.

1 2
Valentia (France) (search for this): narrative 339
Andreas Ludovicus Register to our Soveraigne Lord the Pope, which for the greater credit of the premises, have set my seale to these presents. At Rome, the day and yeere above written. Mauricius Clement the governour and keeper of the English Hospitall in the citie. The King of Spaine his letters to the Lieutenant, for the placing of John Fox in the office of a Gunner. To the illustrious Prince, Vespasian Gonsaga Colonna, our Lieutenant and Captaine Generall of our Realme of Valentia. Having consideration, that John Fox Englishman hath served us, and was one of the most principall, which tooke away from the Turkes a certaine gallie, which they have brought to Tarento , wherein were two hundred, fiftie, and eight Christian captives: we licence him to practise, and give him the office of a Gunner, and have ordained, that he goe to our said Realme, there to serve in the said office in the Gallies, which by our commandement are lately made. And we doe commaund, that yo
Jericho (Israel) (search for this): narrative 339
and a Castle which was at the Cities end, next to the roade, and also an other Fortresse which lay on the Northside of the roade: so that nowe they had no way to escape, but one, which by mans reason (the two holdes lying so upon the mouth of the roade) might seeme impossible to be a way for them. So was the red sea impossible for the Israelites to passe through, the hils and rockes lay so on the one side, and their enemies compassed them on the other. So was it impossible, that the wals of Jericho should fall downe, being neither undermined, nor yet rammed at with engines, nor yet any mans wisedome, pollicie, or helpe set or put thereunto. Such impossibilities can our God make possible. He that helde the Lyons jawes from renting Daniel asunder, yea, or yet from once touching him to his hurt: can not he hold the roring canons of this hellish force? He that kept the fiers rage in the hot burning Oven, from the three children, that praised his name, can not he keepe the fiers flaming b
Callipolis (Italy) (search for this): narrative 339
s, to the astonishment of all the rest. So it fell out, that upon the 29 day, after they set from Alexandria, they fell on the Isle of Candie, and landed at Gallipoli , where they were made much of by the Abbot and Monks there, who caused them to stay there, while they were well refreshed and eased. They kept there the sworde,, and to the incouragement of all true hearted Christians. The copie of the certificate for John Fox, and his companie, made by the Prior, and the brethren of Gallipoli , where they first landed. WE the Prior, and Fathers of the Covent of the Amerciates, of the city of Gallipoli , of the order of Preachers doe testifie, that uGallipoli , of the order of Preachers doe testifie, that upon the 29 of January last past, 1577, there came in to the said citie a certaine gally from Alexandria, taken from the Turkes, with two hundreth fiftie and eight Christians, whereof was principal Master John Fox, an Englishman, a gunner, and one of the chiefest that did accomplish that great worke, whereby so many Christians have
nd sayde, that it was his and their libertie which he sought for, to the honour of his God, & not to make a marte of the wicked treasure of the Infidels. Yet did these words sinke nothing into their stomakes, they did it for a good intent: so did Saul save the fattest Oxen, to offer unto the Lord, and they to serve their owne turne. But neither did Saul scape the wrath of God therefore, neither had these that thing which they desired so, and did thirst after. Such is Gods justice. He that theSaul scape the wrath of God therefore, neither had these that thing which they desired so, and did thirst after. Such is Gods justice. He that they put their trust in, to deliver them from the tyrannous hands of their enemies, he (I say) could supply their want of necessaries. Nowe these eight being armed with such weapons as they thought well of, thinking themselves sufficient champions to encounter a stronger enemie, and comming unto the prison, Fox opened the gates and doores thereof, and called forth all the prisoners, whom he set, some to ramming up the gate, some to the dressing up of a certaine gallie, which was the best in all
Apulia (Italy) (search for this): narrative 339
d served captive in the Turkes gallies, by the space of fourteene yeeres, at length, thorough God his helpe, taking good oportunitie, the third of Januarie last past, slew the keeper of the prison, (whom he first stroke on the face) together with foure and twentie other Turkes, by the assistance of his fellow prisoners: and with 266. Christians (of whose libertie he was the author) launched from Alexandria, and from thence arrived first at Gallipoly in Candie, and afterwardes at Tarento in Apulia : the written testimony and credite of which things, as also of others, the same John Fox hath in publike tables from Naples . Upon Easter eve he came to Rome, and is now determined to take his journey to the Spanish Court, hoping there to obtaine some reliefe toward his living: wherefore the poore distressed man humbly beseecheth, and we in his behalfe do in the bowels of Christ, desire you, that taking compassion of his former captivitie, and present penurie, you doe not onely suffer him
Southhampton (Missouri, United States) (search for this): narrative 339
ll their mastes, sailes, and other such furnitures, as unto gallies doe appertaine, and all the Masters and mariners of them being then nested in their owne homes : there remained in the prison of the said road two hundred threescore and eight Christian prisoners, who had bene taken by the Turks force, and were of sixteen sundry nations. Among which there were three Englishmen, whereof one was named John Foxe of Woodbridge in Suffolke, the other William Wickney of Portsmouth, in the Countie of Southhampton, and the third Robert Moore of Harwich in the Countie of Essex. Which John Fox having bene thirteene or foureteene yeres under their gentle entreatance, and being too too weary thereof, minding his escape, weighed with himselfe by what meanes it might be brought to passe: and continually pondering with himself thereof, tooke a good heart unto him, in hope that God would not be alwayes scourging his children, and never ceassed to pray him to further his pretended enterprise, if tha
Essex (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): narrative 339
s doe appertaine, and all the Masters and mariners of them being then nested in their owne homes : there remained in the prison of the said road two hundred threescore and eight Christian prisoners, who had bene taken by the Turks force, and were of sixteen sundry nations. Among which there were three Englishmen, whereof one was named John Foxe of Woodbridge in Suffolke, the other William Wickney of Portsmouth, in the Countie of Southhampton, and the third Robert Moore of Harwich in the Countie of Essex. Which John Fox having bene thirteene or foureteene yeres under their gentle entreatance, and being too too weary thereof, minding his escape, weighed with himselfe by what meanes it might be brought to passe: and continually pondering with himself thereof, tooke a good heart unto him, in hope that God would not be alwayes scourging his children, and never ceassed to pray him to further his pretended enterprise, if that it should redound to his glory. Not farre from the road, and
Lyons (France) (search for this): narrative 339
ng so upon the mouth of the roade) might seeme impossible to be a way for them. So was the red sea impossible for the Israelites to passe through, the hils and rockes lay so on the one side, and their enemies compassed them on the other. So was it impossible, that the wals of Jericho should fall downe, being neither undermined, nor yet rammed at with engines, nor yet any mans wisedome, pollicie, or helpe set or put thereunto. Such impossibilities can our God make possible. He that helde the Lyons jawes from renting Daniel asunder, yea, or yet from once touching him to his hurt: can not he hold the roring canons of this hellish force? He that kept the fiers rage in the hot burning Oven, from the three children, that praised his name, can not he keepe the fiers flaming blastes from among his elect? Now is the roade fraught with lustie souldiers, laborers, and mariners, who are faine to stand to their tackling, in setting to every man his hand, some to the carying in of victuals, som
Naples (Italy) (search for this): narrative 339
rted from thence on the one day in the morning, and seven gallies of the Turkes came thither that night, as it was certified by those who followed Fox, and his companie, fearing least they should have bene met with. And then they came a foote to Naples , where they departed a sunder, every man taking him to his next way home. From whence John Fox tooke his journey unto Rome, where he was well entertayned of an Englishman, who presented his worthy deede unto the Pope, who rewarded him liberalle author) launched from Alexandria, and from thence arrived first at Gallipoly in Candie, and afterwardes at Tarento in Apulia : the written testimony and credite of which things, as also of others, the same John Fox hath in publike tables from Naples . Upon Easter eve he came to Rome, and is now determined to take his journey to the Spanish Court, hoping there to obtaine some reliefe toward his living: wherefore the poore distressed man humbly beseecheth, and we in his behalfe do in the bowe
Portsmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 339
The woorthy enterprise of John Foxe an Englishman in delivering 266. Christians out of the captivitie of the Turkes at Alexandria, the 3. of Januarie 1577. AMONG our merchants here in England, it is a common voiage to traffike into Spaine: whereunto a ship, being called The three halfe Moones, manned with 38. men, and well fensed with munitions, the better to encounter their enemies withall, and having wind & tide, set from Portsmouth , 1563. and bended her journey toward Sivill a citie in Spaine, intending there to trafique with them. And falling neere the Streights, they perceived themselves to be beset round with eight gallies of the Turkes, in such wise, that there was no way for them to flie or escape away, but that either they must yeeld or else be sunke. Which the owner perceiving, manfully encouraged his company, exhorting them valiantly to shew their manhood, shewing them that God was their God, and not their enemies, requesting them also not to faint in seeing such a heap
1 2