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Zacynthus (Greece) (search for this): narrative 349
ose litle of our way: and while both he, and all of us were in our dumps, God sent us a merry gale of winde, that we ranne threescore and tenne leagues before it was twelve a clocke the next day, and in sixe dayes after we were seven leagues past Zante . And upon Munday morning, being the three and twentie of the same moneth, we came in the sight of Candia which day the winde came contrary, with great blasts, and stormes, untill the eight and twentie of the same moneth: in which time, the Marin 11 day of October we were boorded with foure gallies, manned with 1200 men, which also made a sleevelesse arrant, and troubled us very much, but our captaines pasport, and the gift of 100 chekins discharged all. The 27 of October we passed by Zante with a merrie winde, the 29 by Corfu , and the third of November we arrived at Istria , and there we left our great ship, and tooke small boates to bring us to Venice . The 9 of November I arrived again at Venice in good health, where I staie
Joppa (Israel) (search for this): narrative 349
rt be hard stones, but yet some of them have faire mattraces to lie upon. Upon thursday the eight of August we came to Joppa in a small barke, which we hired betwixt Missagh and Salina , and could not be suffered to come on land till noone the ne their pikes, gunnes, and fauchins. That day being S. Laurence day, we came to Rama, which is tenne Italian miles from Joppa , and there we stayed that night, and payed to the captaine of the castell every man a chekin, which is seven shillings anwould not suffer us to passe till they had somewhat, so it cost us for all our gard above twentie shillings a man betwixt Joppa and Jerusalem. These Arabians troubled us oftentimes. Our Truchman that payed the money for us was striken downe, and h Now having seene all these monuments, I with my company set from Jerusalem, the 20 day of August, and came againe to Joppa the 22 of the same moneth, where wee tooke shipping presently for Tripolis, and in foure dayes we came to Mecina the plac
Judea (Israel) (search for this): narrative 349
pell with two altars, whereupon they say masse: the place is built with gray marble, and hath bene beautifull, but now it is partly decayed. Neere thereto is the sepulchre of the innocents slaine by Herod, the sepulchres of Paul, of Jerome, and of Eusebius. Also a litle from this monasterie is a place under the ground, where the virgine Mary abode with Christ when Herod sought him to destroy him. We stayed at Bethlem that night, and the next day we went from thence to the mountaines of Judea , which are about eight miles from Jerusalem, where are the ruines of an olde monasterie. In the mid way from the monasterie to Jerusalem is the place where John Baptist was borne, being now an olde monasterie, and cattell kept in it. Also a mile from Jerusalem is a place called Inventio sanctae crucis, where the wood was found that made the crosse. In the citie of Jerusalem we saw the hall where Pilate sate in judgement when Christ was condemned, the staires whereof are at Rome, as they
Venice (Italy) (search for this): narrative 349
emaund. He first furnished me with a horse to Venice , for my money, and then tooke me with him a wfift of May, I departed from Augusta towards Venice , and came thither upon Whitsunday, the thirtee of sixe dayes in passing them. I came to Venice at the time of a Faire, which lasted foureteet for the first passage, which went away from Venice about the seventh or eight of May, and with tin which was shewed the plate and treasure of Venice , which is esteemed to be worth two millions ofor the Jesuits, I thinke there be as many at Venice , as there be in Colen. The number of Jewest belong to it. To tell you of the duke of Venice , and of the Seigniory: there is one chosen th that without licence. As for the women of Venice , they be rather monsters, then women. Every Slast we imbarked our selves in a good ship of Venice called the new Nave Ragasona. We entred the st ship, and tooke small boates to bring us to Venice . The 9 of November I arrived again at Veni[4 more...]
Padua (Italy) (search for this): narrative 349
ring a letter unto him, hee may not open it, but in the presence of the Seigniorie, and they are to see it first, which being read, perhaps they will deliver it to him, perhaps not. Of the Seigniory there be about three hundreth, and about fourtie of the privie Counsell of Venice, who usually are arayed in gownes of crimsen Satten, or crimsen Damaske, when they sit in Counsell. In the Citie of Venice, no man may weare a weapon, except he be a souldier for the Seigniorie, or a scholler of Padua , or a gentleman of great countenance, and yet he may not do that without licence. As for the women of Venice , they be rather monsters, then women. Every Shoomakers or Taylors wife will have a gowne of silke, and one to carie up her traine, wearing their shooes very neere halfe a yard high from the ground: if a stranger meete one of them, he will surely thinke by the state that she goeth with, that he meeteth a Lady. I departed from this Citie of Venice, upon Midsommer day, being the
Dort (Netherlands) (search for this): narrative 349
nglish marchants there: and the governors of the towne sent me and my company sixteene gallons of excellent good wine. From thence I went to Frankford , from Frankford to Collen, from Collen to Arnam, from Arnam to Utreight, from Utreight to Dort , from Dort to Antwerpe, from Antwerpe to Flushing, from Flushing to London, where I arrived upon Twelfe eve in safetie, and gave thanks to God, having finished my journey to Jerusalem and home againe, in the space of nine moneths and five dayes.ish marchants there: and the governors of the towne sent me and my company sixteene gallons of excellent good wine. From thence I went to Frankford , from Frankford to Collen, from Collen to Arnam, from Arnam to Utreight, from Utreight to Dort , from Dort to Antwerpe, from Antwerpe to Flushing, from Flushing to London, where I arrived upon Twelfe eve in safetie, and gave thanks to God, having finished my journey to Jerusalem and home againe, in the space of nine moneths and five dayes.
Crete (Greece) (search for this): narrative 349
whereupon we were in great feare. The Master being a wise fellowe, and a good sayler, beganne to devise howe to escape the danger, and to loose litle of our way: and while both he, and all of us were in our dumps, God sent us a merry gale of winde, that we ranne threescore and tenne leagues before it was twelve a clocke the next day, and in sixe dayes after we were seven leagues past Zante . And upon Munday morning, being the three and twentie of the same moneth, we came in the sight of Candia which day the winde came contrary, with great blasts, and stormes, untill the eight and twentie of the same moneth: in which time, the Mariners cried out upon me, because I was an English man, & sayd, I was no good Christian, and wished that I were in the middest of the Sea, saying, that they, and the shippe, were the worse for me. I answered, truely it may well be, for I thinke my selfe the worst creature in the worlde, and consider you your selves also, as I doe my selfe, and then use you
Corcyra (Greece) (search for this): narrative 349
ift of 100 pieces of golde we were quit of them, and had our man againe. That day as aforesaid, we came to Missagh, and there stayed eight dayes, and at last departed towards Candie, with a scant winde. The 11 day of October we were boorded with foure gallies, manned with 1200 men, which also made a sleevelesse arrant, and troubled us very much, but our captaines pasport, and the gift of 100 chekins discharged all. The 27 of October we passed by Zante with a merrie winde, the 29 by Corfu , and the third of November we arrived at Istria , and there we left our great ship, and tooke small boates to bring us to Venice . The 9 of November I arrived again at Venice in good health, where I staied nine daies, and the 25 of the same moneth I came to Augusta , and staied there but one day. The 27 of November I set towards Nuremberg where I came the 29, and there staied till the 9 of December, and was very well interteined of the English marchants there: and the governors of th
Taylors (Missouri, United States) (search for this): narrative 349
t. Of the Seigniory there be about three hundreth, and about fourtie of the privie Counsell of Venice, who usually are arayed in gownes of crimsen Satten, or crimsen Damaske, when they sit in Counsell. In the Citie of Venice, no man may weare a weapon, except he be a souldier for the Seigniorie, or a scholler of Padua , or a gentleman of great countenance, and yet he may not do that without licence. As for the women of Venice , they be rather monsters, then women. Every Shoomakers or Taylors wife will have a gowne of silke, and one to carie up her traine, wearing their shooes very neere halfe a yard high from the ground: if a stranger meete one of them, he will surely thinke by the state that she goeth with, that he meeteth a Lady. I departed from this Citie of Venice, upon Midsommer day, being the foure and twentieth of June, and thinking that the ship would the next day depart, I stayed, and lay a shippeboord all night, and we were made beleeve from time to time, that we
Nuremberg (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): narrative 349
much, but our captaines pasport, and the gift of 100 chekins discharged all. The 27 of October we passed by Zante with a merrie winde, the 29 by Corfu , and the third of November we arrived at Istria , and there we left our great ship, and tooke small boates to bring us to Venice . The 9 of November I arrived again at Venice in good health, where I staied nine daies, and the 25 of the same moneth I came to Augusta , and staied there but one day. The 27 of November I set towards Nuremberg where I came the 29, and there staied till the 9 of December, and was very well interteined of the English marchants there: and the governors of the towne sent me and my company sixteene gallons of excellent good wine. From thence I went to Frankford , from Frankford to Collen, from Collen to Arnam, from Arnam to Utreight, from Utreight to Dort , from Dort to Antwerpe, from Antwerpe to Flushing, from Flushing to London, where I arrived upon Twelfe eve in safetie, and gave thanks to G
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