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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

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Norway (Norway) (search for this): narrative 601
Groenland : the South ende whereof Moletius maketh firme land with America , the North part continent with Lappeland and Norway . Thirdly, the greatest favourers of this voyage can not denie, but that if any such passage be, it lieth subject unt all difficulties, yet doeth it not follow that wee have free passage to Cathayo. For examples sake: You may trend all Norway , Finmarke, and Lappeland, and then bowe Southward to Saint Nicholas in Moscovia: you may likewise in the Mediterranean Ssixt discovered the Moscovian passage farther North then Thyle, & shewed Groenland not to be continent with Lappeland & Norway : the like our Northwesterne travellers have done, declaring by their navigation that way, the ignorance of all Cosmograpter. So that this Northeasterne currant must at the length abruptly bow toward us South on the West side of Finmarke and Norway : or else strike downe Southwest above Groneland, or betwixt Groneland and Iseland, into the Northwest straight we speake
China (China) (search for this): narrative 601
e Molucca spices and pearle for piracie in those Seas. Of a law denying all Aliens to enter into China , and forbidding all the inhabiters under a great penaltie to let in any stranger into those counained with a Barbarian Merchant for a great summe of pepper to be brought into Canton, a port in China . The great and dangerous piracie used in those Seas no man can be ignorant of, that listeth to r some of them were put to the sword, the rest were scattered abroad: at Fuquien a great citie in China , certaine of them are yet this day to be seene. As for the Japans they be most desirous to be acortingals, the Saracenes, and Moores travaile continually up and downe that reach from Japan to China , from China to Malacca, from Malacca to the Moluccaes: and shall an Englishman, better appointeChina to Malacca, from Malacca to the Moluccaes: and shall an Englishman, better appointed then any of them all (that I say no more of our Navie) feare to saile in that Ocean? What seas at all doe want piracie? what Navigation is there voyde of perill? To the last argument. Our travail
Japan (Japan) (search for this): narrative 601
t Ocean beyond America , usually called Mar del Zur, knowen to be open at 40. degrees elevation from the Island Japan, yea three hundred leagues Northerly above Japan : yet may there be land to hinder the thorow passage that way by Sea, as in the examples aforesaid it falleth out, Asia and America there being joyned together ine elevation of 63. degrees: he knewe no Ocean sea beyond Asia, yet have the Portugals trended the cape of Good hope at the South point of Afrike, and travelled to Japan an Island in the East Ocean, betweene Asia & America : our merchants in the time of king Edward the sixt discovered the Moscovian passage farther North then Thyle was therefore put to death. The rude Indian Canoa halleth those seas, the Portingals, the Saracenes, and Moores travaile continually up and downe that reach from Japan to China , from China to Malacca, from Malacca to the Moluccaes: and shall an Englishman, better appointed then any of them all (that I say no more of our Navie)
Tanais (Russia) (search for this): narrative 601
4. degrees north, as Gemma Frisius in his mappes and globes imagineth it, and so left by our countryman Sebastian Cabot in his table which the Earle of Bedford hath at Cheinies: Let the way be voyde of all difficulties, yet doeth it not follow that wee have free passage to Cathayo. For examples sake: You may trend all Norway , Finmarke, and Lappeland, and then bowe Southward to Saint Nicholas in Moscovia: you may likewise in the Mediterranean Sea fetch Constantinople, and the mouth of Tanais : yet is there no passage by Sea through Moscovia into Pont Euxine, now called Mare Maggiore. Againe, in the aforesaid Mediterranean sea, we saile to Alexandria in Egypt , the Barbarians bring their pearle and spices from the Moluccaes up the Red sea or Arabian gulph to Sues, scarcely three dayes journey from the aforesayd haven: yet have wee no way by sea from Alexandria to the Moluccaes, for that Isthmos or litle straight of land betweene the two seas. In like maner although the Northerne
, & Europe, to be environed with the Ocean. I may therfore boldly say (though later intelligences therof had we none at all) that Asia & the West Indies be not tied together by any Isthmos or straight of land, contrary to the opinion of some new Cosmographers, by whom doubtfully this matter hath bin brought in controversie. And thus much for the first part of my answere unto the fourth objection. The second part, namely that America and Asia cannot be one continent, may thus be proved, Kara 7'7}v yM'5 ys9 KotAorrVTra pet KcaT rTv wor0aJowv ro 7rX^Oos. The most Rivers take downe that way their course, where the earth is most hollow and deepe, writeth Aristotle: and the Sea (sayth he in the same place) as it goeth further, so is it found deeper. Into what gulfe doe the Moscovian rivers Onega, Duina, Ob, powre out their streames Northward out of Moscovia into the sea? Which way doeth that sea strike? The South is maine land, the Easterne coast waxeth more and more shalow: from
Ice (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): narrative 601
the hot Zone to be altogether dishabited for heat, though presently wee know many famous and woorthy kingdomes and cities in that part of the earth, and the Island of S. Thomas neere Æthiopia, & the wealthy Islands for the which chiefly all these voyages are taken in hand, to be inhabited even under the equinoctiall line. To answere the third objection, besides Cabota and all other travellers navigations, the onely credit of M. Frobisher may suffice, who lately through all these Islands of ice, and mountaines of snow, passed that way, even beyond the gulfe that tumbleth downe from the North, and in some places though he drewe one inch thicke ice, as he returning in August did, yet came he home safely againe. The fourth argument is altogether frivolous & vaine, for neither is there any isthmos or strait of land betweene America and Asia, ne can these two landes joyntly be one continent. The first part of my answere is manifestly allowed of by Homer, whom that excellent Ge
Good (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): narrative 601
Southeasterlings doe knowe this part of Europe by no other name then Portugall, not greatly acquainted as yet with the other Nations thereof. Their voyage is very well understood of all men, and the Southeasterne way round about Afrike by the Cape of Good hope more spoken of, better knowen and travelled, then that it may seeme needfull to discourse thereof any further. The second way lyeth Southwest, betweene the West India or South America, and the South continent, through that narrow straith nothing. Ptolome knew not what was above sixteene degrees South beyond the Equinoctiall line, he was ignorant of all passages Northward from the elevation of 63. degrees: he knewe no Ocean sea beyond Asia, yet have the Portugals trended the cape of Good hope at the South point of Afrike, and travelled to Japan an Island in the East Ocean, betweene Asia & America : our merchants in the time of king Edward the sixt discovered the Moscovian passage farther North then Thyle, & shewed Groenland
, or levant streame. Some such current may not be denied to be of great force in the hot Zone, for the neerenesse thereof unto the centre of the Sunne, and blustring Easterne windes violently driving the seas Westward: howbeit, in the temperate climes, the Sunne being further off, & the windes more divers, blowing as much from the North, the West and South, as from the East, this rule doeth not effectually withholde us from travailing Eastward, neither be we kept ever backe by the aforesaid Levant windes and streame. But in Magellans streight wee are violently driven backe Westward: Ergo, through the Northwesterne straight or Anian frette shall we not be able to returne Eastward? It followeth not. The first, for that the northwesterne straight hath more sea roome at the least by one hundreth English myles, then Magellans frette hath, the onely want whereof causeth all narrow passages generally to be most violent. So would I say in the Anian gulfe, if it were so narrow as Don Diego an
United States (United States) (search for this): narrative 601
r like elevation? Is not the Ocean sea beyond America farther distant from our Meridian by 30. or 4 ende whereof Moletius maketh firme land with America , the North part continent with Lappeland and egrees of latitude, and the West Ocean beyond America , usually called Mar del Zur, knowen to be opeom out the Northeast, in the passage betweene America and the North land, whither it is of necessitre it striketh South into Mar del Zur, beyond America (if any such straight of Sea there be) then iraphers that either doe joyne Groenland with America , or continue the West Indies with that frosty there any isthmos or strait of land betweene America and Asia, ne can these two landes joyntly be and others. Out of Plato it is gathered that America is an Island. Homer, Strabo, Aristotle, Dionyrne gulfe, and Mar del Zur, to joyne Asia and America together? That conclusion frequented in scholing the divers situation and sundry limits of America , that one may not so rashly, as truely surmis[3 more...]
The South (United States) (search for this): narrative 601
ely that America and Asia cannot be one continent, may thus be proved, Kara 7'7}v yM'5 ys9 KotAorrVTra pet KcaT rTv wor0aJowv ro 7rX^Oos. The most Rivers take downe that way their course, where the earth is most hollow and deepe, writeth Aristotle: and the Sea (sayth he in the same place) as it goeth further, so is it found deeper. Into what gulfe doe the Moscovian rivers Onega, Duina, Ob, powre out their streames Northward out of Moscovia into the sea? Which way doeth that sea strike? The South is maine land, the Easterne coast waxeth more and more shalow: from the North, either naturally, because that part of the earth is higher Aristot. 2 Met. cap. 1. or of necessitie, for that the forcible influence of some Northerne starres causeth the earth there to shake off the Sea, as some Philosophers doe thinke: or finally for the great store of waters engendred in that frostie and colde climate, that the bankes are not able to holde them. Alber. in 2. Meteor. cap. 6. From the North,
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