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Our English that to steale the first blessing of an untraded place, will perhaps secretly hasten thither, may bee beholding to mee for this caveat, if they take notice thereof. They may bee assured, that this people, as they no way sought our harme, but used our men with all kindnesse: so are they impatient of such a wrong, as to have any of their people perforce taken from them, and will doubtlesse seeke revenge. The example of the like practise upon the coast of Guinie, in the yeere, 1566, and againe at Dominica , where Alderman Wats his shippe hardly escaped being taken, may serve for our warning in like case to looke for no good, before they bee satisfied for this injury. When wee had taken aboorde us such victuals as were in the Pinnesse: wee set fire in her, (for her Rudder could serve her to no longer use) and stopping the floodes, plyed to windwarde with the ebbe neere the shoare, untill wee were sixteene leagues to the Eastwarde of the Rivers mouth, and then standin
The second voyage to Guiana . SUNDAY the 26. of January, in the yeere of our Lord 1596. we departed from Portland road, in the Darling of London, having in company the Discoverer, a small pinnesse, whom we lost at sea, in foule weather, the Thursday next following. Friday, the 13. of February, wee fell with the Canarie Islands, where we expected our pinnesse, according to our appoyntment, seven or eight dayes. Here we tooke two boats, the one a passenger, we bulged, the other wee towed at our shippe sterne, steering Southsouthwest for the Islands of Cape Verde. Therehence we set saile the 28. of Februarie, keeping a Westsouthwest course. In this passage wee found very smooth seas, faire weather, and steddie winds, blowing ordinarily betweene the East and Northeast poynts. Neere 30. leagues from these Islands, wee came into a growne sea, the swollen waters making a strange noise & hurtling together, as if it might be two strong currents encountring ech other. The 12.
, be alwayes full of stirs, tumults, and insurrections. The end afterwards confirmed, that this empire consisting of sundry nations, could not keepe it selfe from dissolution. No potentate living hath, or can have so faithfull and incorrupt counsellers, as bee the examples and histories of forepassed times and ages. Wee may therefore bee bolde to thinke that the Governours of the Spanish affaires should minde it, that their kings lustfull desire, and ambitious thoughts to establish over all Europe one lawe, one Lord, one religion, are built and erected on a dangerous ungrounded resolution: Con sidering that many of the neighbour kingdomes being of equall force in men, or greater than hee can make, are setled in a long continued estate, are entire within themselves, and hate to heare the voyce of a stranger. It is not unlikely that they in this case should lay before their king the fatall destinies of many worthies, that have beene constrained for wante of sufficient numbers of their
Guiana (Guyana) (search for this): narrative 877
The second voyage to Guiana . SUNDAY the 26. of January, in the yeere of our Lordge is such, that if the pretended voyage for Guiana doe take place, you shall (I doubt not) find r likely to compasse his intended conquest of Guiana : the governours of the Caraccas and Margarita a sufficient quantitie of gold gotten out of Guiana , to levie and furnish 500. men, having gottenuntil this present that any Spaniards were in Guiana ; that upon our returne our whole fleete will or the Indians in all partes within and neere Guiana , doe offer their service, and promise to proving, contrarie to their kings order, to enter Guiana , and kill Berreo with his followers: or else e Caracas , seeming matters of small account: Guiana onely was in their judgement, rich, plentifulrevention: If hee appeare so eagerly bent for Guiana , as if it were enacted for a lawe amongst the onely this bare assertion: that England and Guiana conjoyned, are stronger, and more easily defe[11 more...]
ions: and lastly, by the provision that the Spaniards doe make to acquite us thereof. Necessarie it is, as being the onely helpe to put a bitte in the mouth of the unbrideled Spaniard; the onely way to enter into his treasurie of Nuevo Reyno, and Peru ; the onely meanes to animate the wronged Indians with our assistance to seeke revenge for the extreme murthers and cruelties, which they have endured, and to ruinate his naked cities in all those parts of the Inland; whose foundations have beene covered, make conclusion, that if it had beene so rich as wee have supposed, that no doubt the king of Spaine would by this time have possessed it. But if they consider that the Spanish nation hath already conquered the two empires of Mexico and Peru , with so many other kingdoms and provinces: wee may very well answere, that his power is not infinite, and that hee hath done well for the time. And yet it is manifest, that this very empire hath beene by all those severall Spaniardes (the cata
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): narrative 877
e all intimated in the onely example of Spaine it selfe; which without the Indies is but a purse without money, or a painted sheath without a dagger. In summe: it seemeth unto me, that whereas the difficultie of performing this enterprise hath bene produced for a discouragement: it were a dull conceite of strange weakenes in our selves, to distrust our own power so much, or at least, our owne hearts and courages; as valewing the Spanish nation to be omnipotent; or yeelding that the poore Portugal hath that mastering spirit and conquering industrie, above us; as to bee able to seate himselfe amongst the many mightie princes of the East Indies, to frontire China , to holde in subjection the Philippinas, Zeilan, Calecut, Goa, Ormus, Mozambique , and the rest; the navigation being so tedious and full of perill: to suffer our selves to bee put backe for worthlesse cyphers, out of place, without account. All which Regions being nowe also by the late conquest of Portugall, entituled to th
China (China) (search for this): narrative 877
h unto me, that whereas the difficultie of performing this enterprise hath bene produced for a discouragement: it were a dull conceite of strange weakenes in our selves, to distrust our own power so much, or at least, our owne hearts and courages; as valewing the Spanish nation to be omnipotent; or yeelding that the poore Portugal hath that mastering spirit and conquering industrie, above us; as to bee able to seate himselfe amongst the many mightie princes of the East Indies, to frontire China , to holde in subjection the Philippinas, Zeilan, Calecut, Goa, Ormus, Mozambique , and the rest; the navigation being so tedious and full of perill: to suffer our selves to bee put backe for worthlesse cyphers, out of place, without account. All which Regions being nowe also by the late conquest of Portugall, entituled to the Spanish king: to whom the Colonies of those parts doe yet generally refuse to sweare fealtie and allegiance: and the care depending on him, not onely in governing them
Mozambique (Mozambique) (search for this): narrative 877
produced for a discouragement: it were a dull conceite of strange weakenes in our selves, to distrust our own power so much, or at least, our owne hearts and courages; as valewing the Spanish nation to be omnipotent; or yeelding that the poore Portugal hath that mastering spirit and conquering industrie, above us; as to bee able to seate himselfe amongst the many mightie princes of the East Indies, to frontire China , to holde in subjection the Philippinas, Zeilan, Calecut, Goa, Ormus, Mozambique , and the rest; the navigation being so tedious and full of perill: to suffer our selves to bee put backe for worthlesse cyphers, out of place, without account. All which Regions being nowe also by the late conquest of Portugall, entituled to the Spanish king: to whom the Colonies of those parts doe yet generally refuse to sweare fealtie and allegiance: and the care depending on him, not onely in governing them in the East, so farre off; but also of ordering and strengthening of those disu
Parana (Parana, Brazil) (search for this): narrative 877
So called after the name of the right honourable the Earle of Essex. 47 Pawrooma. g.Aripacoro.Ecawini.Manurawini. Iaos.Panipi. Waroopana.Maripa.Chipariparo.Towtwi. Sarinbugh.Wariwag h. Macapowa.Shuracoima. Names of poysoned hearbes. Ourari. Apareepo. Carassi. Parapara. 48 Moruga. g.Piara.Chaimeragoro. Iaos.Arwaccas. Cooparoore. g.Awiapari.Topoo. Manarecowa.Iarwarema. Hearbes good against poyson. Turara. Wapo. Cutarapama. Macatto. 49 Waini . g. Charibes. Tocoopoima. g. Parana .   50 Barima. g.Caitooma.Arooca. Charibes.Arwaccas. Pekwa. g.Arwakima. Anawra.Aparwa.Arracurri. The 29. day of June we arrived in Portland roade, having spent five moneths in going, staying, and returning. 51 Amacur. g.         52 Aratoori. g.Cawrooma. g.Raleana, orOrenoque.MaiparIta caponeaOwarecapater.Warucanasso. Ilands in the mouth of Raleana.       In one worde; The time serveth, the like occasion seldome happeneth in many ages, the former repeated considerations
Santiago (Cape Verde) (search for this): narrative 877
he Indian dwellings. They were not of Anthonie de Berreo his companie, that followed this chase, but were the Spaniards of Margarita, and the Caraccas, with whom Santiago forsaking his governour Berreo joyned himselfe. For which fact he now lyeth in fetters at Trinidad , every day expecting sentence of death. The occasion hereof gg the countrey, others in purveying of victuals out of the rivers that doe lie Eastward, of which number these were, that entred into Moruga with twentie Canoas. Santiago passed up into Topiawaries countrey, and there tooke Francis Sparrowe sir George Gifford his man prisoner, who with plentie of gold ransomed his life, and is nowe, they all returned to Trinidad , and beganne to builde their towne there, when unhappily to their small comfort the eight and twentie sayles arrived, and tooke Santiago prisoner. The other Actors in this Enterlude vanished, and in Canoas recovered Margarita and Cumana againe. Eighteene of the said ships leaving all things in go
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