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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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Anc. iv. I ; Prop. ii. 31. 9; Festus, Velleius, Suet. Aug. 29 bis, Hist. Aug. Claud., Ammianus, Schol. Persius, Serv. Aen. vi. 72; delubrum, Plin. NH xxxvi. 24, 32; Actia monumenta, Prop. iv. 6. 17), the second and far the most famous temple of Apollo in Rome (Asc. in Cic. orat. in tog. cand. 90; his temporibus nobilissima), on the Palatine within the pomerium, on ground that had been struck by lightning and therefore made public property (Cass. Dio xlix. 15. 5). It was vowed by Augustus in 36 B.C. during his campaign against Sextus Pompeius, begun in the same year, and dedicated 9th October, B.C. 28 (Vell. ii. 81; Cass. Dio xlix. 15. 5; liii. I. 3; Suet. Aug. 29; Asc. loc. cit.; Mon. Anc. iv. I; Prop. iv. 6, esp. 11, 17, 67; Fast. Amit. Ant. Arv. ad vii id. Oct.; CIL I 2. p. 214, 245, 249, 331; cf. Hor. Carm. i. 31,written on the occasion of its dedication; and for incidental reference to its site Ov. Fast. iv. 951; Fest. 258; Suet. Nero 25); probably represented on a coin of Caligul
18; FUR frgs. I, 418, 421), or area aedis Apollinis (CIL vi. 32327, 23, ludi saec. a. 203). The Sibylline books were brought here from the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol and placed beneath the pedestal of the statue of Apollo (Suet. Aug. 29; Verg. Aen. vi. 72 and Serv. ad loc.; Tib. ii. 5. 17), and they were saved when the temple itself was burned (see below). Part of the ceremony of the ludi saeculares took place at this temple (CIL vi. name. 32323, 32, 139, a. 17 B.C.; 32327, 7, 23, a. 203 A.D.), and it is mentioned incidentally by Tacitus (Hist. i. 27; iii. 65) and in Hist. Aug. Claud. 4 in connection with a meeting of the senate. It is mentioned in the Notitia (Reg. X), but was burned down on 18th March, 363 (Amm. xxiii. 3. 3) Besides Palatinus, the usual epithet of the god worshipped in this temple we find navalis (Prop. iv. 1. 3), Actius Applied because Augustus attributed the victory of Actium (31 B.C.) to the intervention of Apollo. (ib. iv. 6. 67), Actiacus (Ov. Met xii
area Apollinis (Solin. i. 18; FUR frgs. I, 418, 421), or area aedis Apollinis (CIL vi. 32327, 23, ludi saec. a. 203). The Sibylline books were brought here from the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol and placed beneath the pedestal of the statue of Apollo (Suet. Aug. 29; Verg. Aen. vi. 72 and Serv. ad loc.; Tib. ii. 5. 17), and they were saved when the temple itself was burned (see below). Part of the ceremony of the ludi saeculares took place at this temple (CIL vi. name. 32323, 32, 139, a. 17 B.C.; 32327, 7, 23, a. 203 A.D.), and it is mentioned incidentally by Tacitus (Hist. i. 27; iii. 65) and in Hist. Aug. Claud. 4 in connection with a meeting of the senate. It is mentioned in the Notitia (Reg. X), but was burned down on 18th March, 363 (Amm. xxiii. 3. 3) Besides Palatinus, the usual epithet of the god worshipped in this temple we find navalis (Prop. iv. 1. 3), Actius Applied because Augustus attributed the victory of Actium (31 B.C.) to the intervention of Apollo. (ib. iv. 6.
is temple (CIL vi. name. 32323, 32, 139, a. 17 B.C.; 32327, 7, 23, a. 203 A.D.), and it is mentioned incidentally by Tacitus (Hist. i. 27; iii. 65) and in Hist. Aug. Claud. 4 in connection with a meeting of the senate. It is mentioned in the Notitia (Reg. X), but was burned down on 18th March, 363 (Amm. xxiii. 3. 3) Besides Palatinus, the usual epithet of the god worshipped in this temple we find navalis (Prop. iv. 1. 3), Actius Applied because Augustus attributed the victory of Actium (31 B.C.) to the intervention of Apollo. (ib. iv. 6. 67), Actiacus (Ov. Met xiii. 715), and Rhamnusius (Not. Reg. X; for explanations of this name see Rosch. iv. 88). The facade of the original temple was Ionic, if Richmond cit. is right; while it was restored in the Corinthian order by Domitian, if a relief in the Uffizi is correctly interpreted (PBS iii. 241 sqq.; JRS iv. 217-218). The site of the temple has been much discussed. Three main theories have been brought forward, according to which
sius, Serv. Aen. vi. 72; delubrum, Plin. NH xxxvi. 24, 32; Actia monumenta, Prop. iv. 6. 17), the second and far the most famous temple of Apollo in Rome (Asc. in Cic. orat. in tog. cand. 90; his temporibus nobilissima), on the Palatine within the pomerium, on ground that had been struck by lightning and therefore made public property (Cass. Dio xlix. 15. 5). It was vowed by Augustus in 36 B.C. during his campaign against Sextus Pompeius, begun in the same year, and dedicated 9th October, B.C. 28 (Vell. ii. 81; Cass. Dio xlix. 15. 5; liii. I. 3; Suet. Aug. 29; Asc. loc. cit.; Mon. Anc. iv. I; Prop. iv. 6, esp. 11, 17, 67; Fast. Amit. Ant. Arv. ad vii id. Oct.; CIL I 2. p. 214, 245, 249, 331; cf. Hor. Carm. i. 31,written on the occasion of its dedication; and for incidental reference to its site Ov. Fast. iv. 951; Fest. 258; Suet. Nero 25); probably represented on a coin of Caligula (Cohen, Cal. 9- 11; cf. Richmond, Essays and Studies presented to William Ridgeway on his Sixtieth Birthd
lo (Suet. Aug. 29; Verg. Aen. vi. 72 and Serv. ad loc.; Tib. ii. 5. 17), and they were saved when the temple itself was burned (see below). Part of the ceremony of the ludi saeculares took place at this temple (CIL vi. name. 32323, 32, 139, a. 17 B.C.; 32327, 7, 23, a. 203 A.D.), and it is mentioned incidentally by Tacitus (Hist. i. 27; iii. 65) and in Hist. Aug. Claud. 4 in connection with a meeting of the senate. It is mentioned in the Notitia (Reg. X), but was burned down on 18th March, 363 (Amm. xxiii. 3. 3) Besides Palatinus, the usual epithet of the god worshipped in this temple we find navalis (Prop. iv. 1. 3), Actius Applied because Augustus attributed the victory of Actium (31 B.C.) to the intervention of Apollo. (ib. iv. 6. 67), Actiacus (Ov. Met xiii. 715), and Rhamnusius (Not. Reg. X; for explanations of this name see Rosch. iv. 88). The facade of the original temple was Ionic, if Richmond cit. is right; while it was restored in the Corinthian order by Domitian, if a