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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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ARCUS LENTULI ET CRISPINI * between the porta Trigemina and the statio Annonae, erected by Lentulus and Crispinus, the consuls in 2 A.D. (CIL vi. 1385). This inscription is precisely like that (vi. 1384) of the ARCUS DOLABELLAE ET SILANI (q.v.) except for the names, and the two arches were probably built as part of Augustus' general plan of restoring and enlarging the aqueduct system. Whether this arch belonged to an extension of the Marcia or Appia is, however, uncertain. Flavius Blondus, who saw this arch destroyed about the middle of the fifteenth century (Roma Instaurata i. 20), implies that it formed one of several (BC 1914, 112-113; HJ xxi.; LA 312-313; RAP iii. 181-183; Mitt. 1925, 337).
ARCUS LENTULI ET CRISPINI * between the porta Trigemina and the statio Annonae, erected by Lentulus and Crispinus, the consuls in 2 A.D. (CIL vi. 1385). This inscription is precisely like that (vi. 1384) of the ARCUS DOLABELLAE ET SILANI (q.v.) except for the names, and the two arches were probably built as part of Augustus' general plan of restoring and enlarging the aqueduct system. Whether this arch belonged to an extension of the Marcia or Appia is, however, uncertain. Flavius Blondus, who saw this arch destroyed about the middle of the fifteenth century (Roma Instaurata i. 20), implies that it formed one of several (BC 1914, 112-113; HJ xxi.; LA 312-313; RAP iii. 181-183; Mitt. 1925, 337).